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Cyronic Presevation


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Initial post: Jan 21, 2013 10:18:48 AM PST
Fullme7al says:
I couldn't remember where we were talking about this. but here is an update about the girl who was cyrogenically frozen.

http://io9.com/5977640/23+year-old-kim-suozzi-undergoes-cryonic-preservation-after-successful-fundraising-campaign

Back in September we told you about Kim Suozzi, the 23-year old neuroscience student who was in the midst of battling terminal brain cancer. Sadly, she passed away last week on January 17th - but not before a successful fundraising campaign managed to secure the funds required to grant Suozzi her dying wish: cryonic preservation.

Suozzi's effort to get cryonically preserved began when she asked the Reddit community for help. At the time, she was only expected to live for another three to six months, making her request for financial assistance all the more urgent.

"I want to be cryogenically preserved when I die from brain cancer but can't afford it," she wrote, "I am literally begging for financial help."

Needless to say, preservation and storage at a cryonics facility like Alcor Life Extension Foundation or Cryonics Institute is not cheap. A standard Alcor suspension costs $70,000.00, which includes high quality stand-by, neuropreservation, and storage - but only if the terminal member relocates to the Phoenix area (otherwise the additional stand-by and transport costs bring the total to $80,000.00).

A whole-body preservation at Alcor costs $200,000.00. Cryonics Institute charges $28,000.00 for a whole-body preservation, but this fee does not include stand-by and transportation costs.

Both companies use vitrification preservation chemicals that stops the formation of damaging ice crystals, but they also have different facilities and procedures.

Most members of Alcor and CI are able to meet these costs by taking out a second life insurance policy and naming the cryonics company of their choice as the beneficiary. Preservations are only conducted on patients who have already been pronounced clinically dead.

Soon after Suozzi's posting on Reddit, a number of futurists set up a fundraising campaign.

Quickly thereafter, a cryonics-friendly futurist group called Society for Venturism set up its own charitable fund. This group, a volunteer-run not-for-profit, is no stranger to this process; it has already successfully raised funds for two cryopreservations and is currently working on one urgent case.

Between the two fundraising efforts, enough money was raised for Suozzi to be cryonically preserved at Alcor - a procedure that was undertaken a few days ago. Alcor will be issuing a statement shortly.

"When funds are raised for a cryonics charity recipient they can choose to contract with the cryonics organization of their choice," Shannon Vyff told io9. "It is up to them to set up their contract; the Society for Venturism will then provide funds to the cryonics organization they have contracted with." Vyff is the Director of Society for Venturism, and a Cryonics Institute member.

"I have been happy to help the cryonics community, and at times it is hard raise funds for a charity recipient," she told us. "Kim's case was compelling to many people - not only did many cryonicists donate but non-cryonicists as well." After having worked on one charity case before and hearing about how two past cases went, Vyff was impressed with how quickly funds were raised for Suozzi. Within just months she had enough to fund a neurosuspension with Alcor.

Speaking to Vyff, Suozzi's boyfriend had this to say:


Our hope is that technology will continue to progress to the point that Kim may have a real chance of living again in the future. Unfortunately, the development of the requisite technologies could be decades or centuries away. Since Kim is no longer with us to explore and innovate in the field of neuroscience, she is counting on all of us to push for the innovations she had hoped to see in her lifetime.

Until (or unless) the day comes that Kim can be brought back, remember her, celebrate her, and emulate her resilience, so we can create the future of her dreams.

Nobody is too young to make cryopreservation arrangements.

Prior to her death, Suozzi had been in touch with another Society for Venturism case, Aaron Winborn, a 45-year-old man struggling with ALS. Hoping to help, but frustrated by her failing health, she contacted him and apologized that she could not do more.

Those looking to help can do so here.

Top image courtesy Christopher Barnatt/ExplainingTheFuture.

I for one though it would cost more than that. And it's interesting that people fund it through second life insurance policys

Posted on Jan 21, 2013 10:58:34 AM PST
K. Rowley says:
Saw a news story about this recently...

Food Freezing Technology Preserves Human Teeth. Organs Next?
http://singularityhub.com/2011/01/23/food-freezing-technology-preserves-human-teeth-organs-next/

[excerpt]
"But slower freezing causes cell popping ice crystals to form. So, what do you do to prevent ice crystals during slow freezing? Use magnets. ABI is the Japanese company producing the freezer system. ABI's "Cells Alive System" (CAS) vibrates water with magnetic fields, preventing freezing, even at supercool temperatures of -10 degrees Celsius (According to the Patent.) When the field is turned off, the water in the food instantly freezes. No time for ice growth means no Freddy Krueger action on frozen organs."

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 24, 2013 11:53:00 PM PST
"I for one though it would cost more than that. And it's interesting that people fund it through second life insurance policys"

It doesn't cost more because it's a sham. The bodies remain frozen for a while, then are disposed of when there's nobody left who's likely to come and look for them (or when people come, they're shown a dummy with a hastily applied nameplate, maybe).
These companies know full well there's no way the body's ever going to be revived, so there's nothing lost and a lot of money to be made from just putting the bodies in the trash (or through an incinerator, more likely).
Maybe someone working there is honest and believes what they're doing will somehow, some day, allow for the resurrection of the dead, but the technical and scientific staff must know better.

So essentially they can charge whatever the gullible are willing to pay, as long as it's more than enough to cover the cost of keeping the building running and paying the staff, which at $80k a popsicle is going to leave a nice profit margin if there's even a few dozen a year who cough up the dough.

Posted on Jan 25, 2013 12:23:21 PM PST
"The bodies remain frozen for a while, then are disposed of when there's nobody left who's likely to come and look for them"

Do you know this, or you just guessing? And if you know it, then cite, please.

Posted on Jan 25, 2013 12:57:32 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Jan 25, 2013 12:58:24 PM PST
W.T. says:
Though expensive, it could be considered a relatively cheap way to get around the limitations of doctor-assisted suicide. Nobody is charging these doctors with manslaughter.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 25, 2013 1:30:57 PM PST
thats the way our company does it

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 25, 2013 2:08:34 PM PST
Old Rocker says:
lmao

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 25, 2013 5:04:11 PM PST
The doctors aren't being charged with manslaughter because the "popsicles" aren't frozen until after they are declared dead.

Posted on Jan 28, 2013 1:50:17 PM PST
Corpsicles

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 28, 2013 3:07:45 PM PST
Ronald Craig says:
Has anyone tried marketing something like that around Halloween, you think? :)

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 4, 2013 12:11:38 AM PST
"Do you know this, or you just guessing? And if you know it, then cite, please. "

It's the way I'd run the operation, were I so inclined to start a scam like that. It's well known that you can't bring back the dead, so there's no medical need to preserve the bodies in whatever state.
And don't be mistaken: those bodies are dead. Their tissue might be preserved better than previously possible, but that doesn't change the fact that they're dead.
What they're doing is little different from the mummification done by the ancient Egyptians, except they're using pseudo-scientific mumbo-jumbo to get their customers to part with their life savings rather than gods and promises of the afterlife.
And most Egyptian tombs were robbed shortly after being sealed, it's not known by whom but long suspected the priests may have had something to do with that.

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 4, 2013 12:13:41 AM PST
"The doctors aren't being charged with manslaughter because the "popsicles" aren't frozen until after they are declared dead. "

declared dead by the people making money from freezing them... And claiming that process has to start the moment death is detected, so I'd not be surprised if they help them along a bit by starting early and fixing the times on the death certificate afterwards.

Posted on Feb 4, 2013 7:44:12 AM PST
J.T. Wenting,

I think people are wasting their money becoming corpsicles, but I don't think you're being scientific.

Transplants of organs are done soon after someone is declared 'dead' and those organs are fine. So there is some precedent for reviving 'dead' tissue. It really depends on the definition of 'dead'.

The reason I put 'dead' in quotes is that, if as in the past you declared someone 'dead' when their heart stopped, you'd be wrong since you could still revive them. Also people have 'died' by drowning in frozen water and still been revived hours later when taken out.

But I suspect if you wait until 'brain death' to freeze someone, then irreparable damage has occurred to the brain. If I was to go into one of these places (and I wouldn't) I would want them to declare me dead even if I'm not technically and freeze me. Who's to say that I really died?

Posted on Feb 5, 2013 6:30:15 AM PST
W.T. says:
I can only imagine the misconceptions about our society that this sort of thing will lead future archaeologists to assume...

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 5, 2013 8:23:11 AM PST
Bill,

Haha...it's too late for that. Check out the Google "Futurama Head in a Jar Creator" app.

https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.mtvn.CCFuturama&hl=en

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 6, 2013 9:40:24 AM PST
K. Rowley says:
"I can only imagine the misconceptions about our society that this sort of thing will lead future archaeologists to assume..."

Motel of the Mysteries by David MacAulay

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 6, 2013 2:35:30 PM PST
M. Carole says:
Can't remember the title now, but there is also a novel about the ravings of a disgruntled cab driver that are uncovered in some far post apocalyptic future, and of course the superb A Canticle For Lebowitz. Ostensibly, however, the far future will not have a constant source of power to maintain frozen bodies, so what they will actually uncover is a dessicated body in a funny container. Kind of like the Pharoahs.

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 6, 2013 3:43:43 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Feb 6, 2013 3:43:58 PM PST
Tom Rogers says:
The Book of Dave is probably the cab driver story you're thinking of.

Posted on Feb 6, 2013 6:53:58 PM PST
Fullme7al says:
I was discussing this once with a friend and we were talking about aliens coming and finding someone in cryonic preservation and being like "mmmm, frozen food."

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 7, 2013 6:56:13 AM PST
M. Carole says:
Yes, The Book of Dave was the one I was thinking of, thanks.

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 7, 2013 7:13:15 AM PST
K. Rowley says:
"I was discussing this once with a friend and we were talking about aliens coming and finding someone in cryonic preservation and being like "mmmm, frozen food.""

I remember reading a comic book with a story line like that - aliens running across a colony ship with thousands of humans in cryogenic sleep - and the aliens assumed the frozen people were being shipped to some galactic supermarket... so they helped themselves..

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 7, 2013 7:30:31 AM PST
W.T. says:
"I remember reading a comic book with a story line like that - aliens running across a colony ship with thousands of humans in cryogenic sleep - and the aliens assumed the frozen people were being shipped to some galactic supermarket... so they helped themselves."

Seems like I vaguely remember reading the same story, but I can't place it. Was it from the early eighties revival of "Mystery in Space", maybe?

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 7, 2013 7:37:26 AM PST
K. Rowley says:
"Was it from the early eighties revival of "Mystery in Space", maybe?"

Don't remember the title - it was a comic book that came in a big box / grab bag that I bought from the Science Fiction Book Club back in the early 90's... I've since passed that box along to someone else..
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Discussion in:  Science Fiction forum
Participants:  12
Total posts:  23
Initial post:  Jan 21, 2013
Latest post:  Feb 7, 2013

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