Customer Discussions > Science forum

Global warming effects more severe than previous estimates


Sort: Oldest first | Newest first
Showing 1-25 of 250 posts in this discussion
Initial post: Nov 6, 2012 8:12:45 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Nov 6, 2012 10:05:29 PM PST
Ehkzu says:
From the article's summary:

"Scientists thought that if planetary warming could be kept below 2 degrees Celsius, perils such as catastrophic sea-level rise could be avoided.

"Ongoing data, however, indicate that 3 global feedback mechanisms may be pushing the earth into a period of rapid climate change even before the 2 degree C "limit" is reached: meltwater altering ocean circulation; melting permafrost releasing carbon dioxide & methane; & ice disappearing worldwide.

"The feedbacks could accelerate warming, alter weather by changing the jet stream, magnify insect infestations and spawn more & larger wildfires.

Hurricane Sandy's severity is consistent with these observations.

EDIT ADD:
http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=is-global-warming-happening-faster-than-expected&WT.mc_id=SA_CAT_SP_20121105

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 6, 2012 9:47:04 PM PST
[Customers don't think this post adds to the discussion. Show post anyway. Show all unhelpful posts.]

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 6, 2012 10:12:30 PM PST
Ehkzu says:
The people living like "the stone age folks" are hundreds of thousands of victims of Hurricane Sandy, for which America did not prepare.

I love living a comfortable middle class American lifestyle. I love our cars. We just bought a new one, in fact.

Having to sacrifice any of that lifestyle would be, to quote Al Gore, "inconvenient" to say the least.

But I've lived long enough to realize that the universe doesn't care in the slightest about my desires.

Nor does hearing findings I don't like lead me to instantly accuse the scientists reporting those findings of fraud.

That kind of accusation is slander unless you have solid, peer-reviewed evidence that Hurricane Sandy was faked in a warehouse in Arizona, along with the melting glaciers etc.

My wife's Christian church teaches that "thou shalt not bear false witness against they neighbor."

Of course if you're not a Christian--or don't subscribe to Christian-style ethics--that doesn't apply to you.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 7, 2012 8:26:28 AM PST
[Customers don't think this post adds to the discussion. Show post anyway. Show all unhelpful posts.]

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 7, 2012 5:35:12 PM PST
Ehkzu says:
Actually cutting down on the number of people is the only long-term solution that could work.

For a start the world's nations could and should adopt China's One Child policy.

For a milder start we can promote women's rights and family planning--of every sort--worldwide. When women have rights, on the whole, they have fewer children, across all nations and cultures.

It would take 1.4 Earths to support its current human population in its current lifestyle. We're supporting more by eating our seed corn, in the form of overpumping our water wells (China is in particularly perilous shape this way), overplanting crops (especially in tropical areas which nearly all have much thinner soils than the temperate zones), overuse of agricultural chemicals which are poisoning waterways and even plumes in the oceans outside river mouths (the Mississippi's is 150 miles long), overfishing etc.

So we're borrowing more from Mother Nature than we can pay back. And when She comes to collect the bill, that overpopulation problem will be solved.

But you won't like Mother Nature's solution. It would be a lot better if we did it.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 7, 2012 9:59:48 PM PST
[Customers don't think this post adds to the discussion. Show post anyway. Show all unhelpful posts.]

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 8, 2012 6:01:58 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Nov 8, 2012 6:03:11 PM PST
Horse: why do these idjuts want to make us live like the stone age folks

TS: Why are YOU acting like a stone ager here,proud of your ignorance!

Horse: and the economic collapse is scheduled for march 2014
according to top economists
unless teh govts stop deficit spending now

TS: Why not list some citations. It would be telling.

Posted on Nov 10, 2012 10:17:38 PM PST
Ehkzu says:
As the icecaps melt and the weather gets more severe it's amazing to see the global warming denialists deny every new item while copying and pasting the specious pseudoscience "arguments" generated by astroturf websites funded by the Koch Brothers and other billionaire polluters.

These guys are like Baghdad Bob with his cheery pronouncements about demolishing the American army even as our Abrams tanks were barrelling down the streets behind him.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 10, 2012 10:35:07 PM PST
HelVee says:
Horse: 'you cant control the weather any more than the tides'

HelVee: For the hundredth time, weather is NOT climate.

Human actions have *already* affected the climate. By modifying our actions we have a chance to mitigate some of the consequences. Neither will these modifications turn us into 'stone age folks'. But for some communities, doing nothing might come close. http://climate.nasa.gov/effects/

Posted on Nov 11, 2012 12:12:07 AM PST
Ehkzu says:
We can control the human input to the weather, and it's appallingly ignorant to say otherwise.

For example, if a city were to install turf and trees in barrels on the roofs of its buildings it would actually change the climate around that city.

We can also control our responses to the weather. Hurricane Sandy caught NYC flat-footed, because it hadn't spent the billions needed to protect it from the more violent weather wrought by global warming. They need to emulate the Netherlands, whose seawalls are some of the best around. They cost a lot. Sandy cost more.

And of course we can affect the climate--that's exactly why we have today's global warming: human activity. This is a settled issue among the scientific community. It's only controversial with the general public due to the multimillion dollar campaign of lies and deception, in ads and phony astroturf organizations, to make the public believe there's a controversy in the scientific community that doesn't exist.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 14, 2012 2:47:17 PM PST
Jeff Marzano says:
Ehkzu says:

[We're supporting more by eating our seed corn, in the form of overpumping our water wells (China is in particularly perilous shape this way), overplanting crops (especially in tropical areas which nearly all have much thinner soils than the temperate zones), overuse of agricultural chemicals which are poisoning waterways and even plumes in the oceans outside river mouths (the Mississippi's is 150 miles long), overfishing etc.]

"The human race lives for the present, since it really has no future."

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 15, 2012 5:13:25 PM PST
Doctor says:
Jeff,

We are actually not eating are seed corn. We are taking much of our corn and making ethonal out of it so we can raise the price of corn to poor people and subsidize the big agri corps.

http://www.businessweek.com/stories/2006-05-18/ethanol-myths-and-realities

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 15, 2012 10:20:59 PM PST
Jeff Marzano says:
Doctor says:

[We are taking much of our corn and making ethonal out of it so we can raise the price of corn to poor people and subsidize the big agri corps.]

Yes I've heard about that. The idea of using food for fuel doesn't sound too great to me either.

I have heard that it actually takes more energy to convert corn into fuel than the fuel that gets produced. I guess this is another case where making a profit screws something else up.

The entire world is on about a 2 month leash for the worldwide wheat crop. In other words there's a 2 month supply saved in the grain silos or wherever they keep it. If something were to happen to wheat production within 2 months massive starvation would occur.

Wheat is an interesting plant. Wheat DNA is more complex than human DNA.

Jeff Marzano

Posted on Nov 18, 2012 4:16:20 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Nov 23, 2012 5:28:29 PM PST
Ehkzu says:
Worse than diversion of corn agriculture into ethanol production is the industrial-scale burning off of tropical rainforests, replacing them with palm oil plantations, for a low-quality food oil and/or biodiesel (thanks to Frisco Beach for this correction--I'd thought it was for ethanol; it's not, but it is one of the main things tropical rainforests are being destroyed to produce). Over 2/3 of the oxygen in our atmosphere is outgassed by tropical rainforests...

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 18, 2012 7:14:18 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Nov 18, 2012 7:15:50 PM PST
Ehkzu

I believe palm oil is used for biodiesel, but not for ethanol; it's used in huge numbers of processed foods. Sugar cane is generally the substrate for Brazilian ethanol.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Palm_oil

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ethanol_fuel_in_Brazil

Posted on Nov 19, 2012 1:11:30 PM PST
The Weasel says:
No responsible person wants to see corn used for fuel. That's an energy loser as well as a food supply problem. Jahtropha plants would be a much better solution. But US Agri-business wouldn't profit from Jahtropha so corn is still being pushed.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 20, 2012 5:54:59 AM PST
A customer says:
andthehorseirodeinontoo? - "why do these idjuts want to make us live like the stone age folks"

Spoken like a man who knows that attacking what was actually said is not even worth trying.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 21, 2012 10:39:52 AM PST
Jeff Marzano says:
Ehkzu says:

[Over 2/3 of the oxygen in our atmosphere is outgassed by tropical rainforests...]

At what point are some of these problems going to start causing major havoc for the entire world more so than they already are ?

I heard they're hunting the blue fin tuna fish into extinction to make sushi. Don't these maniacs realize that once those fish are gone they can't be easily replaced if ever ?

It's all based on what someone is willing to pay for. One of those large tuna fish sells for over $ 100,000 in Japan. So guess what ? They keep catching them.

I guess it's easy to forget that North America and Europe were forests also at one time. That's probably one reason the threat from destroying the rain forests in South America is so much greater. We've already destroyed ours.

Jeff Marzano

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 21, 2012 10:54:09 AM PST
The Weasel says:
Jeff Marzano says:
I heard they're hunting the blue fin tuna fish into extinction to make sushi. Don't these maniacs realize that once those fish are gone they can't be easily replaced if ever ?
***
Please take the time to look up the Passenger Pigeon. Once numerous enough to be recorded in written accounts as "blocking out the sun" - but also a good cheap source of food.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 21, 2012 2:31:42 PM PST
Jeff Marzano says:
The Weasel says:

[Please take the time to look up the Passenger Pigeon.]

There was a walrus like creature living up in the North Pole going back a few hundred years ago. When people started sailing up there they discovered that this creature tasted like beef. They killed them all and ate them.

The DoDo bird is gone.

Many turtles today are endangered. People make turtle soup out of them.

Did you know the term 'Booby Trap' is named after a bird called the Booby that is very friendly to people and would walk into the traps sailors would set for them so they could eat them ?

On the other side you've got the problem of people having introduced non native species into new areas where they aren't part of the ecosystem.

So called 'killer bees' were imported from Africa into South America to increase honey production. Well the inevitable happened. Some schmuck down there let them loose. Those bees are more aggressive than the native species in South America. They interbred with and overran the native species so now South America has 'Africanized' bees which bite all the animals and can even kill people. Now they're in the Southern United States.

Bees are an integral part of agriculture and food production. I guess they didn't think about that angle either when the messed around with the bee population.

There's the Snakehead fish that people from Viet Nam and other places throw into American rivers because it's 'bad luck' to kill them. They have no natural predators in North America and are eating everything else in the water. Some species of Snakeheads get very large and could easily bite a child's arm off.

Same with the Asian Carp which was imported by those schmucks down in Arkansas to eat algae or something. Now they're taking over the entire Mississippi River system and will probably get into the Great Lakes soon.

The Florida Everglades are now overrun with gigantic African pythons that people no longer wanted to keep as pets because they realized the snakes could easily crush them. There's actually been cases where those snakes killed children whose parents were keeping them as pets.

There's a TV show on the Animal Planet channel called Fatal Attractions where people get too involved with wild animals or try to even keep them as pets. I have an episode recorded now about some guy who tried to keep an African hyena as a pet.

I wouldn't recommend keeping a chimpanzee or similar primate as a pet. A lady's chimp went berserk and caused one of the most horrific injuries to a human being that anyone has ever seen. They attack the body's extremities like fingers, nose, lips, ears, and certain other places.

Jeff Marzano

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 22, 2012 8:23:20 AM PST
Adult chimpanzees have 5-10 times the upper body strength of humans, and the emotional maturity of a 1 year old. IMO it would be crazy to keep one for a pet.

All the ones we see in the movies and ads are "baby" chimpanzees. The adults are a totally different beast.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 22, 2012 8:30:06 AM PST
A customer says:
That's right. Adult humans threaten to rip your arm off and beat you to death with the wet end. Adult chimpanzees can. Not nearly as emotionally mature.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 22, 2012 8:33:28 AM PST
Humans have been defined as inhibited apes. 90% of the synapses in our gigantically expanded neocortex are inhibitory.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 22, 2012 8:38:40 AM PST
A customer says:
The other 10% must be AWESOME!

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 22, 2012 8:59:44 AM PST
:)
‹ Previous 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Next ›
[Add comment]
Add your own message to the discussion
To insert a product link use the format: [[ASIN:ASIN product-title]] (What's this?)
Prompts for sign-in
 


 

This discussion

Discussion in:  Science forum
Participants:  21
Total posts:  250
Initial post:  Nov 6, 2012
Latest post:  Dec 23, 2012

New! Receive e-mail when new posts are made.
Tracked by 2 customers

Search Customer Discussions