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whats next for the LHC ?


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Initial post: Nov 13, 2012 8:06:18 AM PST
http://spectrum.ieee.org/podcast/at-work/test-and-measurement/whats-next-for-the-large-hadron-collider

Posted on Nov 13, 2012 9:57:23 AM PST
the problem with higgs is that we need 5 of them
shades of string theory

when will we have the Mhiggstheory to unite them

But particle physicists know the standard model is incomplete. For one thing, it doesn't include gravity. It doesn't contain any particles that are good candidates for the dark matter that astrophysicists speculate makes up about 22 percent of the universe. And it's also really inelegant-without some very fine tuning of parameters, the standard model says the mass of the Higgs boson should be staggeringly high, basically out of reach of any particle collider we could hope to build.

So there are a range of other theories out there that have been proposed to fill in the blanks. Probably the most famous one is called "supersymmetry," which proposes that every particle in nature has a supermassive partner. The electron has a supersymmetric partner, for example, called the selectron. And all the quarks that make up protons and neutrons in atoms have supersymmetric partners called squarks. There are different flavors of supersymmetry, but all supersymmertric theories, Incandela told me, propose a minimum of five Higgs particles.
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Discussion in:  Science forum
Participants:  1
Total posts:  2
Initial post:  Nov 13, 2012
Latest post:  Nov 13, 2012

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