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How old is Humanity, really?


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In reply to an earlier post on Aug 22, 2012 11:38:00 AM PDT
Rev. Otter says:
<<we only use about 10% of our brain's capacity>>

that's 100% wrong. :)

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 22, 2012 11:43:58 AM PDT
Mysticseal says:
[Customers don't think this post adds to the discussion. Show post anyway. Show all unhelpful posts.]

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 22, 2012 11:45:14 AM PDT
Mysticseal says:
Ms. Kessler, we already dealt with that false truism, lol.

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 22, 2012 11:47:48 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Aug 22, 2012 11:53:44 AM PDT
M. Helsdon says:
" i am ready for the onslaught of laughter and throwing of feces from the monkey cages."

In your previous incarnations you never learned to stand away from the monkeys?

Poop-throwing is a sign of intelligence...

http://rstb.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/367/1585/37

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 22, 2012 11:52:46 AM PDT
Mysticseal says:
Yes, to this we can truly say that everything happens for a reason as cold as it may seem. God allows it because we have free will and we choose it.

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 22, 2012 11:59:04 AM PDT
Mysticseal says:
No, to the contrary, there are also those who choose to pay off karmic debt by working for organizations like doctors without borders, the red cross, Christian Children's fund and a myriad of other charitable organization whose focus is helping those who otherwise would never get any help at all. Remember, where there is capacity for great evil there is an equal capacity for great good. All is kept in balance. However, i sometimes think, why are people like myself, one of deep conscience, made poor and unable to help those in need. All i can think is I chose a situation in which I would always feel guilty even though i do try to give as much as the opportunity presents itself and no matter how little it is.

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 22, 2012 12:03:44 PM PDT
John McClain says:
"However, i sometimes think, why are people like myself, one of deep conscience, made poor and unable to help those in need."

Simple. Because there is no magical hocus pocus like you want to believe. Things simply are the way they are.

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 22, 2012 12:05:35 PM PDT
Mysticseal says:
On the contrary, there are people who go to other countries and dig wells and build irrigation systems for crops, and provide medicine for the sick and food for the starving. perhaps not as much as we would like but it does happen. The question is, do you give to any such organization or do you choose to ignore it unless you can use it to prove your point of fatalism. I can't know if you give or not. That is your business. If you do I think that is very commendable.

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 22, 2012 12:07:50 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Aug 22, 2012 12:11:54 PM PDT
M. Helsdon says:
"No, to the contrary, there are also those who choose to pay off karmic debt by working for organizations like doctors without borders, the red cross, Christian Children's fund and a myriad of other charitable organization whose focus is helping those who otherwise would never get any help at all. Remember, where there is capacity for great evil there is an equal capacity for great good. All is kept in balance."

Hmm, you must have led a very sheltered life, and perhaps a priveleged one to see this doctrine as anything other than morally bankrupt. Anyone who believes that the lives of humans spread across this planet are in "balance" has some serious travelling to do, or needs to watch more detailed News reports.

And even if you are poor and living somewhere in the West, compared with many people elsewhere in the world you are comparitively rich: you have the wealth and freedom to be able to post on Amazon.

"However, i sometimes think, why are people like myself, one of deep conscience, made poor and unable to help those in need. All i can think is I chose a situation in which I would always feel guilty even though i do try to give as much as the opportunity presents itself and no matter how little it is."

By your own declaration, being "made poor" is no excuse as you could chose to volunteer. Money isn't everything, though it certainly helps if you haven't anything. Reincarnation is ultimately an empty mechanism for maintaining the status quo, whether in a society or in the life of an individual, as your own last sentence indicates.

"On the contrary, there are people who go to other countries and dig wells and build irrigation systems for crops, and provide medicine for the sick and food for the starving. perhaps not as much as we would like but it does happen."

This has nothing to do with reincarnation.

"The question is, do you give to any such organization or do you choose to ignore it unless you can use it to prove your point of fatalism. I can't know if you give or not. That is your business. If you do I think that is very commendable."

I don't expect any reward in this life (or any hypothetical life) for the time, effort and resources I've donated.

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 22, 2012 12:19:33 PM PDT
Mysticseal says:
Unfortunately the Western philosophical mindset is undoubtedly patriarchal. Women, for so much od history, were forbidden education and forced to live in the home with the kiddies cooking and cleaning while the men sat on the front porches thinking and discussing high minded ideas after supervising the work of their surfs for even the poor were not allowed to think for themselves until after the printing press and public schools of a sort. I have always wondered what the Declaration of Independence or The Constitution of the United States would have said had women been involved in the writing or (tongue in cheek) we would still be talking about how to compose them.

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 22, 2012 12:22:39 PM PDT
Mysticseal says:
There is so much more to learn we can't even begin to know. i believe what we know of the universe would fit on the head of a pin compared to what could be known if we had the technology. As the technology gets more sensitve just think of how many questions just today could be answered!!!!!!

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 22, 2012 12:28:44 PM PDT
Mysticseal says:
Rev, I have already been called out on that one and admitted my fault.

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 22, 2012 12:55:11 PM PDT
Mysticseal says:
There are many, what we would call poor, who are just living the way they have been living since recorded history and don't consider poor or rich, just as they are and paying a Karmic debt for them is much different. Just because we view them as poor does not mean they do, which really cuts down on what is considered poverty. However, yes, in comparison to most of the world my possessions make me far more fortunate than others and I do donate time when the situation presents itself so money is not my only criteria for giving. I always admit that my beliefs should always be in question, which is what mystics and philosophers do but, in my experience with prayer and meditation I find my personal beliefs to be valid because I have experienced far too many coincidences for me to believe otherwise, that I can have an affect when I point my attentions in certain directions but that is just me. maybe I just want to see that my effort does not go to waste.

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 22, 2012 1:10:16 PM PDT
barbW says:
That's all interesting, but the Enlightenment began about 1700? I'm not a fan of connecting the Crusades with history centuries later. As you say, it wasn't this grand idea coming from a vastly superior Europe, although it might have been taught this way in the past.

We always read about the Arabic innovations compared to the reversal of thinking in Dark Age Europe, but I think it's eye candy by enthusiastic historians and others. I mean, how did it actually work to bring on the scientific method centuries later?

I think people in the right place at the right time, always driven by economics, began to be curious about exploiting some everyday physics from mine operations and textile techniques and weapon manufacturing, BUT it was the lucky combination of all these in small countries that traditionally traded with each other. India and Africa weren't lucky like this. China had a closed society with strict and very separate groupings of people.

You know more about these subjects than I do, I might be 'way off base.

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 22, 2012 1:10:24 PM PDT
Mysticseal says:
I have probably misstated the concepts of punishment or rewards, it is what we choose to focus on and where we choose to focus it. it is more about motives. I do not expect, just because I may do something good, that I am owed a reward. Whatever happens to me happens, I only have myself to blame if I make a wrong decision. If I make a good decision good may come to me or it may not. All will be decided later, which is where justice comes in. We certainly do not have a system of justice, either court related of world related in this life, which is the driving force behind reincarnation, justice. Maybe it just makes me comfortable to believe that justice does exist in the world beyond. I can't know. All I can do is judge by the coincidences that pile up in my life.

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 22, 2012 1:19:43 PM PDT
Mysticseal says:
I don't thinkl you are off base. Yes. it was world trade that opened up not only new innovations but new curiosities that spurred on the development of the scientific method and the innovations that occurred during the reformation, renaissance, and the industrial revolutions. We also have to consider the building of a new economic system, unions that came about because of unbridled capitalism, not I said unbridled, I am not anti capitalist, Necessity is the mother of invention. When the former no longer worked the later had to take precedent.

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 22, 2012 1:24:08 PM PDT
barbW says:
Yes, we agree. I'm not saying that women would have done a better job, not at all.

Women necessarily have different opportunities to make time for high-minded ideas, they're expected to be caretakers and there's no end to it. This is a disadvantage, but they also have many advantages. Emily Dickinson made the choice to shut herself off from her local society more than what was normal, to me that was sad, but I'm glad that she could accomplish what she did, which will be with us forever. Also, she had the advantage of seeing the world as a woman, and this was priceless.

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 22, 2012 1:29:17 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Aug 22, 2012 1:29:54 PM PDT
Mysticseal says:
What really bothers me today is that many women like Nancy Pelosi, Hillary Clintion, Diane Fienstien and a few others who have made it in the world of men were forced to think like men and become just as corrupted. There are also woman CEO's that have taken the same track. I guess there is no escape from suitcases full of cash, power brokering or pleasing stockholders.

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 22, 2012 1:40:57 PM PDT
barbW says:
yes, they're being pressured by men

....tee hee

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 22, 2012 2:04:09 PM PDT
M. Helsdon says:
"That's all interesting, but the Enlightenment began about 1700?"

Yes, but it wasn't an event without foundations, some going back several centuries.

"I'm not a fan of connecting the Crusades with history centuries later. As you say, it wasn't this grand idea coming from a vastly superior Europe, although it might have been taught this way in the past."

Viewing European history in isolation is a mistake, because it was and is intricately connected with other areas. Whilst it wasn't the only cause for the collapse of the Roman Empire, for example, trade with India was a factor in the gradual economic collapse, because a lot of Roman gold (a relatively rare element in Europe) was used to buy directly and indirectly Indian goods.

"We always read about the Arabic innovations compared to the reversal of thinking in Dark Age Europe, but I think it's eye candy by enthusiastic historians and others. I mean, how did it actually work to bring on the scientific method centuries later?"

Through the transmission of texts and technology that had been lost in Europe; even when those classical authorities were in error, they opened up the intellectual life of European minds, and in many cases Islamic scholars had added to and improved some of the material. The transmission of this material, from the Near East, via the remnants of Moorish Spain (primarily the Caliphate of Cordoba and its successors), and the Norman kingdom of Sicily, and the Crusades fed into the Renaissance of the 12th century, which in turn laid the foundations for the great Renaissance of the 15th which ultimately led to the Enlightenment. That's an enormous simplification, but there was a whole train of events that led to the rise of our modern world.

"I think people in the right place at the right time, always driven by economics, began to be curious about exploiting some everyday physics from mine operations and textile techniques and weapon manufacturing, BUT it was the lucky combination of all these in small countries that traditionally traded with each other."

Lots of linkages, many factors, and it is all to easy to imagine a world where the Enlightenment didn't happen. An example would be China...

"India and Africa weren't lucky like this."

Africa was trapped by geography. India by culture: today a subcontinent divided by nuclear armed powers, where one has a major space program, a barely functioning power grid, and there are still people living in poverty, and lacking basic amenities...

"China had a closed society with strict and very separate groupings of people."

If it weren't for the Little Ice Age, a Mongol invasion and the efforts of conservative Confucists then China could well have embarked on its own Enlightenment. In Ming times, Chinese ships travelled great distances, but the political decisions to turn away from ocean trade, thereby reducing revenues by accidentally promoting smuggling and piracy. As a result China missed out on the benefits of increasing world trade, including the transmission of intellectual ideas, until that trade was forced upon it.

"You know more about these subjects than I do, I might be 'way off base."

I'm no expert and my knowledge is spotty, but it is apparent that the underlying philosophy and mythology of a culture can do it not only good, but severe harm.

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 22, 2012 3:23:11 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Aug 22, 2012 3:39:23 PM PDT
John Donohue says:
>>Shiv K. Singh says:
If you really had a scientific mind and really wanted the truth, you would have simply googled few of the words from my posting, (ironically using "cut and paste"), and you would have been seen the quote and the fact that the quote is right, and your unnecessary negative posting, not right.<<

Shiv K. Singh -- reincarnation is total hooey. Everything we know about our -- what do you call it -- personality? soul? -- indicates that these things are made by our brains. When the brain is injured, our personalities change or disappear entirely. There is nothing to study and serious people won't waste any time on it.

But!!!!! You can get together with creationists and get some money to test your eccentric view. It's odd that all you cranks and crackpots who show only contempt for real science want real scientists to invest their time and money into your stupid fancies. Of course you don't do any testing since as a religious crackpot you know the answer before you even start.

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 22, 2012 6:40:45 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Aug 22, 2012 6:48:31 PM PDT
Irish Lace says:
Deleting in recognition that conversation with Singh is entirely pointless.

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 22, 2012 7:28:27 PM PDT
Lj3d

We use 100% of our brains all of the time. The only 'unused capacity' is our individual choice not to employ that capacity.

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 22, 2012 7:38:53 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Aug 22, 2012 7:40:06 PM PDT
Lj3d says:
I agree. I never really bought into the unused capacity idea, although I think we sometimes do not use all our brains capacity, but only in small percentages.

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 22, 2012 7:42:43 PM PDT
Lj3d

If you get the chance, try and see a video of a brain working on an idea. There are more flashing lights than a jackpot on a slot machine.
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Discussion in:  Science forum
Participants:  44
Total posts:  834
Initial post:  Aug 14, 2012
Latest post:  Sep 21, 2012

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