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What About the 21st Century Would Most Surprise Vistors from the 18th and 19th Centuries?


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Showing 26-50 of 56 posts in this discussion
In reply to an earlier post on Nov 14, 2012 5:36:45 AM PST
Irish Lace says:
Gee, horse didn't read before he posted. There's a shocker.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 14, 2012 6:13:01 AM PST
He'd've done better to have resisted the temptation to respond at all. I'd be surprised if anyone would have noticed.

Posted on Nov 14, 2012 10:24:32 AM PST
Rev. Otter says:
i'm presuming that everyone in this scenario is taking the notion of TIME TRAVEL in stride, right? ;)

Posted on Nov 14, 2012 11:11:41 AM PST
Bubba says:
LEDs and fluorescent lights might be quite novel, although not surprising. 19th century science fiction did include artificial light that did not produce heat; actually seeing it work and being able to carry an LED flashlight would be quite surprising. Laser pointers might also be novel because although laser-like devices were popular as weapons and destructive devices, I don't believe that the use of a laser as a pen-like pointing device, and cat toy, was ever mentioned.

They might be surprised to find that many things are very similar to what they were in the late 19th century. Kitchen gadgets and appliances have changed, but we are still drinking from and eating off of glass and ceramic dishes, and flatware has changed little. Our stoves have evolved, but they still have hot places on the top for pots and pans, and a hot box for baking. Cookware and bakeware have changed little. Furniture has changed in style and materials, but most of it would still be familiar in form and function; today's furniture might be more familiar to someone from the 19th century than furniture from the 50s and 60s.

Supermarkets and mega-stores would be quite a big shock to someone from the 19th century, I don't know that they were anticipated.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 14, 2012 11:12:21 AM PST
Karen L. says:
Rev., I did when I started the thread. Why not?

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 14, 2012 11:14:56 AM PST
Karen L. says:
Bubba, It's true. So many things have remained the same or are similar.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 14, 2012 11:30:32 AM PST
Rev. Otter says:
<<<<i'm presuming that everyone in this scenario is taking the notion of TIME TRAVEL in stride, right?>>>>
<<Rev., I did when I started the thread. Why not?>>

just trying to put myself in the shoes of someone who just got sent 200+ years into the future.

and i think my biggest surprise wouldn't be "wow, flying cars" or "wow, look what they're wearing", but "WOW TIME TRAVEL WORKS!" :)

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 14, 2012 12:53:25 PM PST
Karen L. says:
Revised Otter, Well, maybe. But I think they might be more interested in what they are seeing all around them than in how they got to see it.

Posted on Nov 14, 2012 3:47:01 PM PST
Bill M. says:
I think what might shock most past century visitors is what we DON'T have. Namely, that we still have some of the same problems that we had 200 years ago. I'm not knocking science or technology; I've always loved both. But there's been this past utopian notion that technology in the 21st century would include instant solutions to things like the common cold, romance problems, crime, menstruation, bad weather, etc.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 14, 2012 4:09:43 PM PST
Karen L. says:
Bill M. I don't know. So far, in this century, we don't think technology will solve many of the problems we have. I also love science and technology but the popularity of Facebook and Twitter doesn't make me optimistic that we will use technology intelligently in the future. Were they really so optimistic in the past? Some 19th century writers may have been Utopian in their outlooks but I suspect most people were not.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 14, 2012 6:22:18 PM PST
Karen Lee,

It is something that is still going on in the 21st century that would surprise the 18th and 19th century visitors -- assuming that had seen some of the other things.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 14, 2012 6:25:48 PM PST
Bubba,

I'm not sure furniture has changed for the better -- my grandfather would comment how poorly it is made!

Posted on Nov 14, 2012 7:44:12 PM PST
I vote for Richard Kepler's word salad and appalling puns.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 14, 2012 9:18:33 PM PST
Irish Lace says:
Hmmm.... when did menstruation become something that needs a "solution"?

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 14, 2012 10:26:20 PM PST
Irish,

Wasn't that a guy that said that? Maybe Leviticus is getting in his way?

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 14, 2012 11:51:39 PM PST
You can get furniture made as well as you like, for a price.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 15, 2012 4:33:05 AM PST
Bubba says:
Very true, I have a simple wooden chair from the early 20th century that is built far better than most modern chairs. The weaknesses in 19th century furniture that have been improved in modern furniture are the finishes and the adhesives used for applying veneer. Also, MDF is the work of the devil.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 15, 2012 8:50:12 AM PST
Bill M. says:
Irish Lace said:

>>Hmmm.... when did menstruation become something
>>that needs a "solution"?

Ask my wife; she's the one who complains about it. She tells me half-jokingly that she wishes technology would hurry up and find a way to alleviate the need to change tampons, along with alleviating the other undesirable physical effects that happen (if you'll pardon the pun) periodically.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 15, 2012 9:04:21 AM PST
Bill M. says:
Karen Lee said:

>>Were they really so optimistic in the past? Some 19th century writers
>>may have been Utopian in their outlooks but I suspect most people
>>were not.

I'm not saying they were all optimistic. Heck, I'm sure there were even more people convinced that the horse and buggy would never be replaced. I do notice though that more often than not, predictions of what the distant future looks like tend to end up pretty far off. I think that if a group of people living in 1970 were transported to the year 2010, many of them would be disappointed to realize that it doesn't look anything like "The Jetsons".

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 15, 2012 2:21:19 PM PST
I miss Kno,

I can, but most cannot as those craftsmen aren't all they common any more!

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 15, 2012 2:22:33 PM PST
Bubba,

Shall we start an anti-MDF petition? LOL

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 15, 2012 2:23:52 PM PST
Bill M.

The technology already exist, even if she wants to preserve her "organs". Preserving fertility has been iffy.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 15, 2012 2:26:51 PM PST
Irish Lace says:
"
>>Hmmm.... when did menstruation become something
>>that needs a "solution"?

Ask my wife; she's the one who complains about it."

Indeed. As my daughter has often said, "This is 'intelligent design'?"

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 15, 2012 2:44:28 PM PST
Karen L. says:
Reed and Bubba, I'll sign the petition!

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 15, 2012 5:10:01 PM PST
Bubba says:
Ikea wouldn't have anything to make most of its furniture from if there wasn't any MDF.
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This discussion

Discussion in:  Science forum
Participants:  12
Total posts:  56
Initial post:  Nov 13, 2012
Latest post:  Nov 15, 2012

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