Customer Discussions > Science forum

No One has satisfactorily answered the question: What came before The Big Bang? How did the Big Bang Come From Nothing and From Nowhere to "Create" This Universe? What happened Before Space and Time and Matter?


Sort: Oldest first | Newest first
Showing 51-75 of 80 posts in this discussion
In reply to an earlier post on Jan 15, 2013 8:37:10 AM PST
A. Caplan says:
anne says: How are you sure Maimonides was a male? Was it impossible for a writer back in those days to use a different name and cause readers to believe they were the opposite gender?
>Again with the stupid questions? I will indulge you this one last time since you are not willing to learn on your own. Mosheh ben Maimon, AKA Maimonides, was a well known person in his time. Mosheh ben Maimon is a male name. There is no mystery about his life.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 15, 2013 9:03:28 AM PST
Brian Curtis says:
Psychologist Jonathan Haidt agrees with your point. In his book, The Righteous Mind: Why Good People Are Divided by Politics and Religion (Vintage), he notes that various 'axes' of morality matter more or less to different political perspectives. Liberals put more weight on ideals like fairness and compassion, while conservatives have a stronger tendency to embrace concepts like loyalty and purity.

Posted on Jan 15, 2013 9:36:04 AM PST
[Customers don't think this post adds to the discussion. Show post anyway. Show all unhelpful posts.]

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 15, 2013 9:50:54 AM PST
M. Helsdon says:
"How are you sure Maimonides was a male?"

Mosheh ben Maimon was a well documented Jewish scholar and rabbi in the 12th century. 'Ben' - son of - being a pretty good clue to his gender.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 15, 2013 3:34:25 PM PST
Irish Lace says:
"anne says: what gender was Maimonides?

Caplan: "You could just use Google to learn anything you want about him.... Or you can just continue asking inane questions. "

I had the exact same thought, "Why doesn't she just Google it; she has most of the world's knowledge at her fingertips?" Then I figured it was some "inside" Jewish thing.

Apparently not. It was just an inane question.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 15, 2013 3:35:07 PM PST
Irish Lace says:
Why do you ask, Anne?

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 15, 2013 3:37:01 PM PST
Irish Lace says:
Shiv: "Thank you for accepting that you have a mind that comprehends. Now, you would agree that your mind has comprehended your existence, and therefore, here you are, acting as an illuminati, shining the existential light on big bang, even though there was no one to hear the bang, when the bang happened. (sic) "

Speaking of inane questions..

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 15, 2013 3:53:42 PM PST
In spite of that, cyclic theories are still viable. They require a certain broadening of terms, such as what a "universe" is, or what "size/scale" means, and some other stuff. But it is certainly true that Eternal Inflation is viable, and has cyclic aspects. The Ekpyrotic scenario is something that could happen at intervals. Also, Penrose recently put forward a cyclic theory that could work even in the context of just one universe that 'forever expands' in one direction.

The "Big Crunch" may be out of the running, for the reasons you mention. But a far as we know, these other ideas haven't been falsified, and are still on the table.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 15, 2013 9:56:37 PM PST
barbW says:
"...the typical time remaining before the global collapse is comparable to the present age of the universe..."

According to a paper by Andrei Linde
0208156v2

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 16, 2013 6:58:44 AM PST
There's been a lot of water under the bridge since 2002, when Linde wrote that. Undoubtedly, a creative theorist can still work around Perlmutter's findings, I'd guess. Nonetheless, the consensus seems to favor non-collapsing models pretty strongly, as of the present. I wouldn't say that anything is 100% settled, ever... But the writing is on the wall.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 16, 2013 8:00:21 AM PST
A. Caplan says:
Irish Lace says: Apparently not. It was just an inane question.
>Her questions usually are.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 16, 2013 7:38:03 PM PST
Irish Lace says:
That's becoming clear.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 16, 2013 8:51:40 PM PST
barbW says:
you have a talent for saying nothing ;)

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 16, 2013 9:57:43 PM PST
Hey, at least I have a talent!

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 16, 2013 10:01:03 PM PST
Does that post need unpacking?

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 17, 2013 5:39:37 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Jan 17, 2013 6:27:24 AM PST
anne says:
anne: <How are you sure Maimonides was a male? Was it impossible for a writer back in those days to use a different name and cause readers to believe they were the opposite gender? Or was it impossible for a writer back then to be a female? >

Irish: <Why do you ask?>

anne: Just curious.

I read that the printing press was invented in the 1400s, so literacy was available to the masses in Maimonide's time, so I think it's possible for some writers we assumed were male to be actually female. Maybe Maimonides was one of them--I don't know.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 17, 2013 11:31:06 AM PST
A. Caplan says:
anne: Just curious.
>Just not enough to find out for yourself.

anne: I read that the printing press was invented in the 1400s, so literacy was available to the masses in Maimonide's timeI read that the printing press was invented in the 1400s, so literacy was available to the masses in Maimonide's time
>But you didn't bother to read that Maimonides died in 1204? Is your lack of knowledge intentional? Please have someone introduce you to the wonders of internet search engines.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 17, 2013 12:29:27 PM PST
Irish Lace says:
"Just curious."

Do you not know how to use a search engine?

"I read that the printing press was invented in the 1400s, so literacy was available to the masses in Maimonide's time, so I think it's possible for some writers we assumed were male to be actually female. Maybe Maimonides was one of them--I don't know. "

I'm probably going to regret this question but... what does the invention of the printing press in the 13th century have to do with you questioning the gender of Maimonedes who was quite dead by that time?

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 17, 2013 4:51:07 PM PST
anne says:
Oops, I thought Maimonides lived in the 1500s.

So were only men literate in the 1100's? Is that how people are so sure Maimoides was male?

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 17, 2013 6:57:43 PM PST
Irish Lace says:
"So were only men literate in the 1100's? Is that how people are so sure Maimoides was male? "

That question makes no sense at all.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 17, 2013 8:33:49 PM PST
noman says:
have you ever considered doing some research on your own?

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 18, 2013 5:10:37 AM PST
anne says:
Sorry--the purpose of this line of questioning started with the post when Balok wrote: <Teach thy tongue to say 'I do not know,' and thou shalt progress - Maimonides> And I responded: <Maimoides must have been a very wise person. Let me give it a try. Because I don't know, I'd like to ask: what gender was Maimonides? Let's see if I make any progress.>

Some random poster responded that his proof of Maimonides was male was the 'ben' in his name, but I don't consider that good enough, as anyone can write their name to indicate opposite gender, as we all know from these very forums. So I'm taking stabs at other proofs.

I'm aware females were using male pen names as far back as the 1800s, but that there was a time that only males were literate. I'm wondering if that was the case in Maimonides' time.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 18, 2013 5:13:39 AM PST
noman says:
have you ever considered doing some research on your own?

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 18, 2013 5:23:23 AM PST
Irish Lace says:
"Some random poster responded that his proof of Maimonides was male was the 'ben' in his name, but I don't consider that good enough,"

Anne, you asked random strangers a question, the answer to which you do not know. And yet, you reject the answer when it is offered by making a claim that, on its face, appear superfluous and shallow. So, what do you do? You ask again for the random strangers to answer your question. That is not "taking a stab at other 'proofs'." That is asking random strangers their opinions.

Here's a thought... Look it up, anne. Read about Maimonedes and, perhaps, a little about his era and his culture. Then decide for yourself. When you feel confident that you could intelligently defend your opinion regarding his gender, THAT is how you will have progressed.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 18, 2013 11:42:58 AM PST
Charlie T. says:
A Universe from Nothing: Why There Is Something Rather than Nothing
[Add comment]
Add your own message to the discussion
To insert a product link use the format: [[ASIN:ASIN product-title]] (What's this?)
Prompts for sign-in
 


 

This discussion

Discussion in:  Science forum
Participants:  25
Total posts:  80
Initial post:  Jan 9, 2013
Latest post:  Jun 28, 2013

New! Receive e-mail when new posts are made.
Tracked by 1 customer

Search Customer Discussions