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How come humans don't shed the hair on the top and back of their heads?


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Showing 1-14 of 14 posts in this discussion
Initial post: Feb 21, 2012 12:53:17 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Feb 21, 2012 12:54:12 PM PST
How come humans don't shed the hair on the top and back of their heads? And beards for sexual mature males?

Humans do shed eyebrows, pubic hair, chest, back, arm and leg hair.

Why did humans evolve with these unusual hair mutations? 3 types of hair?

And if you don't believe in evolution, did the God create humans this way so hairdressers would have jobs?

Posted on Feb 21, 2012 7:39:32 PM PST
Are you kidding? Look at male pattern baldness and which hair gets lost.

Next question....

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 21, 2012 10:15:58 PM PST
tokolosi says:
"male pattern baldness" is a misnomer -- all that hair that stops growin' on the top of the head starts sproutin' on their backs...

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 22, 2012 12:03:45 AM PST
As I understand it, we do in fact shed the hair on our heads: hair goes through alternating phases of growth, shedding, rest, and re-growth. It's just that the growth phase of the hair on the top and back of our heads lasts longer, and hence results in much longer hairs, than hairs elsewhere on the body. Admittedly, this raises the question of why that happens, to which I do not know the answer.

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 26, 2012 5:26:50 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Mar 10, 2012 7:09:00 AM PST
barbW says:
it's a signaling adaptation survival advantage against big cat predation

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 26, 2012 7:37:29 PM PST
So different hairstyles helped advance humanity into civilization? mohawks and ponytails? Maybe caring for hair led to regular bathing habits, which led to civilization?

How many other animals have similar hair? Poodles are not natural, they were bred that way.

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 26, 2012 8:00:18 PM PST
TN says:
"To the asking of questions there is no end"

Hairstyles may have helped advance humanity into civilization, or human may just prefer varieties.

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 27, 2012 6:46:44 PM PST
@O

needed to help keep the brain warm for survival

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 27, 2012 6:47:13 PM PST
@O

no
God preprogrammed the genomes to cause the variations over time

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 9, 2012 10:58:21 AM PST
They do. Humans are constantly shedding the hair on their heads. But with over 100,000 hairs on the average scalp, you don't notice anything, since only a small fraction of the total number are shedding at any one time. There is a condition called "telogen effluvium" where the shedding cycles of all the hair follicles synchronize for poorly understood reasons, and all the hairs shed at once, which needless to say creates considerable distress, but it's usually only a temporary condition.

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 9, 2012 10:59:55 AM PST
When someone goes bald, they don't actually lose the hair. The hair just becomes extremely fine and short.

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 10, 2012 6:08:45 AM PST
Tero says:
Darwin's "sexual selection". It is our peacock tail.

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 10, 2012 7:11:17 AM PST
barbW says:
there's some of that -- between dominant males and the younger males trying to get with the girls, but I still like, it's a signaling adaptation survival advantage against big cat predation.

Posted on Mar 10, 2012 10:33:36 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Mar 10, 2012 5:18:01 PM PST
I just wonder if at some point in evolution before clothing and sharpened tools, that 20- 25 year old adult humans were walking around with huge giant afros or 3 foot long tangled up ratty hair. Men having dirty tangled beards. Of course few people would ever live to what we think of as elderly. Humans then evolved into grooming habits to deal with these issues, which led to a more complex society?
Or did humans evolving into social groups with the ability for personal hygiene THEN evolve mutant persistant hair so men and women could then become more of an individual to enhance their social status, the "peacock effect" as said, men looking tough and trying to attract mates? That could explain why men evolved beards, to look manly.
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Discussion in:  Science forum
Participants:  9
Total posts:  14
Initial post:  Feb 21, 2012
Latest post:  Mar 10, 2012

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