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If someone could become invisible, wouldn't they be blind too?


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In reply to an earlier post on Jun 4, 2012 7:41:03 PM PDT
Spinoza says:
Jeff Marzano says:

The government always has an explanation for everything.

Spinoza says:

So, it appears, do you.

Here's a link to a web site that explains the whole thing:

http://www.roswellfiles.com/story.htm

It really was a balloon, Jeff. Much more likely than a flying saucer, although not as much fun. :-)

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 5, 2012 8:25:11 AM PDT
There's nothing at all going on in Roswell. I've been there. Believe me.

Posted on Jun 5, 2012 9:34:57 AM PDT
Brian Curtis says:
Regarding invisibility:

The Physics of Superheroes

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 5, 2012 11:29:46 AM PDT
Jesferkicks says:
reports on that Philly Experiment with the destroyer were more hoopla than fact, no boat disappeared and turned up somewhere else, no sailors disappeared to never return again. They just barely built an invisible cape, but thats with the use of material than can be manipulated to deflect light, would be pretty hard to do that to human skin I'd think.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 5, 2012 5:02:06 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Jun 5, 2012 5:05:22 PM PDT
Jeff Marzano says:
Jesferkicks says:

[reports on that Philly Experiment with the destroyer were more hoopla than fact]

Not according to Al Bielek.

He says a ship called the Eldridge was transported 40 years into the future from 1943 to 1983 and ended up at the now infamous Montauk army base on Long Island in New York.

The time machine apparatus was concealed in a fake gun turret on the ship and required tremendous amounts of electrical power to create the gravitational or magnetic effects. The 40 year jump in time is important from a philosophical or occult perspective. The Earth is on some sort of 20 year cycle.

When they got to '83 they were greeted by an elderly looking gentleman who introduced himself as Dr. John von Neumann. They didn't believe this guy because they had just left von Neumann and he was a much younger man. But von Neumann informed them that they were participating in a time travel experiment and they could be sent to any time period. As they observed the helicopters, color TV, etc., they became convinced.

von Neumann further explained that the time machine had somehow become self aware and alive and it was defending itself and could not be shut off. Bielek says Einstein had predicted that if people built a machine and made it sophisticated and powerful enough it would come alive. They were ordered to go back to '43 and destroy the equipment with axes or anything they could find.

When the ship rematerialized in 1943 Al and Duncan observed their other brother Jimmy imbedded up to his waste in the ships wooden deck. He was dead or near death. When Duncan observed this scene he jumped overboard, back into that grey void, and got left in 1983.

As a result of all of this chaos the Office Of Naval Research got fed up with the project. They needed the ship for the war and told von Neumann to shut everything down. But after the war the government told von Neumann to revisit the project and get the kinks out.

Dr. von Neumann didn't know why some of the sailors on the Eldridge had gone permanently insane. According to Bielek the answer to that and other questions was provided by extra terrestrials. Remember what I was saying about that saucer that crashed at Roswell ? Well there was a survivor.

The alien told von Neumann that at the moment of conception the human soul creates a reference point in time with the planet Earth. The original experiment interfered with and disrupted this time reference and thus caused severe psychological distress. With the help of this EBE von Neumann was able to perfect the time machine.

Jeff Marzano

Terminator 3: Rise of the Machines [Blu-ray]

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 5, 2012 5:29:24 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Jun 6, 2012 6:00:29 AM PDT
Spinoza says:
Spinoza says:

Sorry, Jeff. What you describe is impossible. Von Neumann died in 1957 of cancer:

"In 1955, von Neumann was diagnosed with what was either bone or pancreatic cancer.[81] A von Neumann biographer Norman Macrae has speculated: "It is plausible that in 1955 the then-fifty-one-year-old Johnny's cancer sprang from his attendance at the 1946 Bikini nuclear tests."[82] Von Neumann died a year and a half later. While at the Walter Reed Army Medical Center in Washington, D.C., he invited a Roman Catholic priest, Father Anselm Strittmatter, O.S.B., to visit him for consultation. This move shocked some of von Neumann's friends in view of his reputation as an agnostic.[83] Von Neumann, however, is reported to have said in explanation that Pascal had a point, referring to Pascal's wager.[84] Father Strittmatter administered the last sacraments to him.[15] He died under military security lest he reveal military secrets while heavily medicated. Von Neumann was buried at Princeton Cemetery in Princeton, Mercer County, New Jersey.[85] On his death bed, he entertained his brother with word-for-word recitations of the first few lines of each page of Goethe's Faust.[5]"

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_von_Neumann#Death

I liked the Terminator franchise very much. Except I'm sure its fiction. It's a movie. What makes you believe any of the above is factual?

A von Neumann alive and well in 1983 after dying and being buried in Princeton, NJ 26 years earlier? 20 year Earth cycles that are important from a philosophic or cult perspective? Aliens telling a resurrected von Neumann that human beings create a "reference point in time with the planet Earth upon birth?" What the hell does this even mean?

And is there any corroborating evidence of all this other than testimony from alleged eyewitnesses?

Come on, Jeff. Get real. This is all science fiction, and no more factual than Jules Verne's 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea, Arthur C. Clarke's 2001: A Space Odyssey, or Lewis Carroll's Alice's Adventures in Wonderland.

No Philly Experiment with invisibility, no time machines, no Von Neumann in 1983.

You're much too credulous.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 5, 2012 6:00:44 PM PDT
Jeff Marzano says:
Spinoza says:

[Sorry, Jeff. What you describe is impossible. Von Neumann died in 1957 of cancer.]

What you said is called a paradox. How could someone who died in 1957 have been at the Montauk base in 1983 ?

Those are all the subtle and mysterious questions related to physically traveling through time like the grandfather paradox where someone travels back in time and kills their grandfather.

One theory is they would create an alternative future where they were never born. Those alternative futures are not new universes but different views of our universe like looking at a hologram from different angles. That's part of the theory about the holographic universe.

What you said however is interesting because it shows that Dr. von Neumann was involved with highly classified projects for the U.S. government. Einstein undoubtedly was also.

There's an episode of the TV show Through The Worm Hole called 'Does Time Really Exist ?'.

There's a laboratory or facility in Boulder, CO that has the most sophisticated and precise clocks in the U.S.. These clocks only lose one second over billions of years.

They took two of these clocks and synchronized them so they were both giving the exact same time. Then they elevated one of them just 12 inches off the floor and confirmed that it got out of synch with the other one. The reason is the elevated clock was farther away from the Earth and its gravitational effect.

I guess this proves Einstein's theories about the relationship between time and gravity. Gravity slows time down. In a black hole the gravitational forces are so unimaginable that time not only slows down but completely ceases to exist.

Now what would happen if powerful gravitational fields could be induced using electricity ?

I guess that's the basis for The Philadelphia Experiment. The Navy had a very powerful and highly classified welding process that were using to build their ships during World War II. They noticed that when the welder was used physical objects would just disappear. Their conclusion was the welder was producing a miniature black hole effect.

The Philadelphia Experiment was the attempt to explore this phenomenon for possible military applications.

I have heard theories like this. The military has the ability to create black holes. They have a black hole weapon system.

Jeff Marzano

The Holographic Universe By Michael Talbot

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 6, 2012 5:59:39 AM PDT
Spinoza says:
Jeff says:

What you said is called a paradox. How could someone who died in 1957 have been at the Montauk base in 1983 ?

Spinoza says:

Actually, Jeff, what YOU have stated is a paradox, that a man could die in 1957 and still be alive in 1983. I have stated no paradox. As far as I am concerned, Von Neumann died in 1957, as the record clearly shows.

What I have stated is that Von Neumann could not have been working on anything after 1957, after he died. You have stated that he was.

The record demonstrates clearly that neither Einstein nor Von Neumann was doing any research or work on the Philadelphia experiment.

Creating a black hole would require enormous amounts of energy and matter, impossible to produce back in 1943, 1983, or now.

The rest of what you mention is interesting, but not evidence that the Philadelphia Experiment involved time travel, or that there was some sort of secret project involving time travel in Montauk in the 1980s.

This is what we'd call an urban legend.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 6, 2012 7:47:36 AM PDT
Jeff Marzano says:
Spinoza says:

[The record demonstrates clearly that neither Einstein nor Von Neumann was doing any research or work on the Philadelphia experiment.]

There are no records of this type of activity. At least no records that the public has easy access to.

After the experiment Al Bielek was telling people about what happened even after being warned to stop doing this. I guess they couldn't just kill him outright because he had traveled through time.

So one day a teary eyed von Neumann told Al what they were going to do to him. They put him inside of a magic circle at Montauk and somehow transferred his soul into another body. He became a baby again and had to grow up with a different family. That's how his last name changed from Cameron to Bielek.

They may have sent him back in time 30 years or so. After awhile when the human body realizes it has been moved into a different time it will age physically to adjust to the new time period.

That's what happened to Duncan in 1983. When his body realized what happened Duncan aged 40 years in about 2 days and ended up dying.

In his new (second) life Al again became an engineer. He was in a hotel room one day and happened to catch the movie 'The Philadelphia Experiment' on HBO. As he watched this movie all the memories of what happened somehow began to surface from his sub conscious mind. He began an investigation into the experiment and was eventually able to piece together what happened.

As far as the movie, the first few minutes are accurate according to Al.

This is another story that would make a good movie now that a lot of new info has come out.

Jeff Marzano

The Philadelphia Experiment

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 6, 2012 8:30:10 AM PDT
Someone could travel forward in time from 1957 to 1983 by travelling in a rocket at a substantial fraction of the speed of light, but he couldn't get back to 1957 afterwards to die.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 6, 2012 11:39:54 AM PDT
Spinoza says:
Jeff says:

There are no records of this type of activity. At least no records that the public has easy access to.

Spinoza says:

There aren't any records because it never happened.

We do have records of Einstein's work with the Navy working on ordinance. We have records of his death in 1955.

We have records of von Neumann's work with the Manhattan Project (designing the lenses necessary for the implosion process for detonation of a plutonium bomb at Los Alamos. At the time period you suggest, von Neumann was making regular trips out to the Los Alamos lab. He was on the committee that made the final selection of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki targets.

We also have records of von Neumann's year and a half battle with cancer, and his death on Feb. 8, 1957 at the Walter Reed Army Medical Center in Bethesda, Maryland.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 6, 2012 11:47:41 AM PDT
Spinoza says:
Jeff says:

So one day a teary eyed von Neumann told Al what they were going to do to him. They put him inside of a magic circle at Montauk and somehow transferred his soul into another body. He became a baby again and had to grow up with a different family. That's how his last name changed from Cameron to Bielek.

Spinoza says:

You have now exited the region of probability and entered the Twilight Zone, Jeff.

Interestingly enough, this sounds a lot like what the faithful have to say about religion and God, just with a technical addendum.

If you bump into Rod Serling, tell him Spinoza says "Hi!"

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 6, 2012 11:54:28 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Jun 6, 2012 11:55:19 AM PDT
According to his biographer, John Bardeen went to see Einstein shortly after the U.S. entered the war to interview him about an idea he had for torpedoes which would be set off by the electrical field created by a ship's metal hull. Bardeen pointed out that torpedoes were also made of metal. Einstein suggested maybe they could put a plastic window on the torpedo.....

Posted on Jun 6, 2012 1:10:38 PM PDT
Spinoza says:
OK, here's my evidence that time travel is possible. What's more, my references are older and more authoritative than Jeff's:

A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court - Mark Twain

The Time Tunnel - starring Starring Dennis Hopper, Bart La Rue and Dick Tufeld, produced by Irwin Allen

The Time Machine by H.G. Wells

Rip Van Winkle by Washington Irving

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 6, 2012 1:18:32 PM PDT
Spinoza says:
arpad says:

According to his biographer, John Bardeen went to see Einstein shortly after the U.S. entered the war to interview him about an idea he had for torpedoes which would be set off by the electrical field created by a ship's metal hull. Bardeen pointed out that torpedoes were also made of metal. Einstein suggested maybe they could put a plastic window on the torpedo.....

Spinoza says:

Einstein was a smart guy... always able to see the obvious. ;-)

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 8, 2012 11:17:37 AM PDT
Charlie T. says:
An invisible person would indeed be blind. There was an SF story about an invisible creature detected because it had dark spots at its eyes, but I can't remember the title. Anyone know?

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 11, 2012 5:39:45 AM PDT
Brian Curtis says:
The only similar story I recall is Asimov's "Misbegotten Missionary," where a shapeshifting alien sneaks aboard an Earth ship and can only be detected by its patches of green fur where eyes would be. No invisibility, though.

http://www.pdfepubebooks.info/63/index_split_012.html

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 12, 2012 12:03:57 PM PDT
a man who dies in 57 can be alive in 83? I had to laugh at that one. death is man's enemy and leads to non existance. otherwise God would of told us so in his word. I won't debate whether the bible is gods word or not, there is enough evidence out there to look at especially on the net to make up one's own mind reading both pros and cons.

rose

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 13, 2012 8:38:37 AM PDT
The idea that death is the "enemy" needs to be qualified. It's often a "friend" when someone is old, terminally ill, in severe chronic pain, in desperate hopeless poverty, etc. etc.

Death is also the shaper of evolution, so we literally would not be here if it weren't for death.

Death is a key factor in the progress of knowledge, society, and culture, by removing those who resist progress through ignorance or ossification of the mental faculties.

That's why I think the Hindu concept of 3 major deities, Brahma, Vishnu, and Shiva, the Creator, Sustainer, and Destroyer, is so profound. You can't have one without the others.

Posted on Jun 13, 2012 10:23:36 AM PDT
Brian Curtis says:
Death is indeed essential and inevitable. That doesn't mean I have to like it.
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Discussion in:  Science forum
Participants:  14
Total posts:  45
Initial post:  Sep 14, 2011
Latest post:  Jun 13, 2012

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