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The Moon and Mercury - are they related?


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Showing 51-58 of 58 posts in this discussion
In reply to an earlier post on Jun 23, 2012 5:44:40 PM PDT
Lj3d says:
Actually, the size should not be an absolute requirement. Two rifle bullets, one travels at 1,800 mph the other at 20,000 mph. Both identical. Which will do more damage and without either orbital or velocity information, how can you tell?

Posted on Jun 23, 2012 5:45:25 PM PDT
Yog-Sothoth says:
Velikovski revisited?

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 23, 2012 8:23:16 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Jun 23, 2012 8:25:30 PM PDT
J. Schwarz says:
We studied that in class to learn about the impact craters. KE= 1/2(MxV)2 if I remember the formula. It all depends on the speed of the object. So what difference will there be between impact craters on the moon and impact craters on Mercury. Trick question.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 23, 2012 9:33:03 PM PDT
Lj3d says:
I don't know the answer to that question since I'm not an expert on either body.

Posted on Jun 23, 2012 9:45:18 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Jun 23, 2012 10:02:16 PM PDT
J. Schwarz says:
Hint. Gravity. So two identical objects traveling at the same speed, and one hits Mercury and the other the moon. There are different size craters on the moon being bowl shaped, single peak, ring peak and multiple ring and each one is determined by the size of the object, so multiple rings would be the biggest body and the largest crater. On Mercury the gravity would influence the size of the crater allowing for smaller craters but with the appearance of the larger ones on the moon if I understood my professor well. So a much smaller crater could have multiple rings and the ejecta would not travel as far and neither would the rays.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 23, 2012 11:52:00 PM PDT
Interesting post. I find it fascinating that there are infinite possiblilities for explaining something in orbit around our planet. Space is the only limitless frontier. We strive to understand all of its intricacies and are humbled.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 23, 2012 11:55:30 PM PDT
Lj3d says:
Sounds reasonable to me.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 23, 2012 11:58:17 PM PDT
Lj3d says:
I'm not usually interested in these kinds of posts despite having strong spaceflight and astronomical interests but this post drew me in. It has turned out to me to be one of the better posts, and well worthy of being a scientific debate that doesn't get too in depth only three people end up debating, but discusses science and not science vs religion.
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This discussion

Discussion in:  Science forum
Participants:  12
Total posts:  58
Initial post:  Jun 16, 2012
Latest post:  Jun 23, 2012

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