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Impact of the asteroid passing us by


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Showing 1-18 of 18 posts in this discussion
Initial post: Feb 15, 2010 11:47:55 AM PST
ColdShot says:
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Posted on Feb 15, 2010 1:20:22 PM PST
ColdShot says:
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Posted on Feb 15, 2010 8:10:19 PM PST
ColdShot says:
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In reply to an earlier post on Feb 16, 2010 4:18:26 AM PST
Coldshot,

The only thing unusual about this asteroid is it's closeness to Earth. Otherwise it's just another small body orbiting the sun like so many millions of others. Why suspect that it'll have any noteworthy effects?

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 16, 2010 7:14:18 AM PST
Andre Lieven says:
CFM:"Why suspect that it'll have any noteworthy effects?"

How about, because he's a pig ignorant raving loony ?

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 16, 2010 5:06:51 PM PST
ColdShot says:
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In reply to an earlier post on Feb 16, 2010 5:07:53 PM PST
ColdShot says:
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In reply to an earlier post on Feb 16, 2010 6:37:13 PM PST
[Deleted by Amazon on Sep 7, 2011 11:08:15 AM PDT]

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 17, 2010 2:26:21 AM PST
[Deleted by Amazon on Feb 17, 2010 8:07:57 AM PST]

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 17, 2010 5:24:13 AM PST
ColdShot,

While I wouldn't go so far as Mr. Lieven, I will suggest that the proportions of things in the universe may be difficult to grasp, and you seem to have an understandable difficulty doing so. There are sources on the internet that illustrate the relative sizes of planets and various stars. I hope you'll look them up.

You really should give the word "coincidence" some kind of validity, as coincidences _do_ occur. The Sun is an object worth studying in its own right, regardless of any passing asteroids. Hence, a launch of a satellite to study the Sun is a valuable undertaking to help understand the "weather" in interplanetary space; such understanding will help us protect our communications satellites and any astro- or cosmonauts we have outside the atmosphere at any give time.

To think that there's a meaningful connection between this asteroid and that spacecraft is about as far out as any astrological connection between planets and personality. On the other hand, a number of spacecraft have been launched quite specifically to examine asteroids and other interplanetary phenomena. The difference with this situation is that the influence of this asteroid on the sun or the solar wind, while real, is much too tiny to be of any consequence at all, at least within the lifetime of the human race.

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 17, 2010 7:43:24 AM PST
ColdShot says:
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In reply to an earlier post on Feb 17, 2010 7:49:56 AM PST
ColdShot says:
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In reply to an earlier post on Feb 17, 2010 8:16:14 AM PST
ColdShot,

Yes, coincidence, in the sense that the satellite would have been launched on its goal of studying the sun whether or not the asteroid flew past. Interested astronomers have been tracking that asteroid for years. On a parallel and probably-not-related track, physicists and engineers were preparing that satellite and others for their missions.

Actually, we're more finely balanced than you seem to feel. The issue, really, is that "balance" in this case means long-term stability, not a situation easily pushed into chaos. Long-term astronomical projections of the planetary orbits (projected over millions of years) show some pretty wild variations from today's orbits, but it's not likely that we'll be kicked, suddenly, into such situations.

To put your mind at ease, recall that this asteroid has been following its orbit for millions of years, lending its weight and gravity to the general stability of the solar system. Gravitationally, it's a well-known friend in the family of particles around our Sun.

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 17, 2010 10:00:10 AM PST
Andre Lieven says:
CS:"If that's true then why is nasa spending....or according to you, wasting, all that money studying the sun?!"

Um... Because that is a part of their assigned tasks. Also because the solar weather does affect not only our other spacecraft, such as comsats, but it also affects our infrastructure here on Earth.

-http://www.findingdulcinea.com/news/science/2009/march/Severe-Solar-Flares-Could-Cause-Catastrophic-Power-Outage-in-United-States.html
-http://www.space.com/scienceastronomy/power_outage_031031.html
-http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solar_storm_of_1859

Here what Hydro Quebec, the power provider to my old hometown of Montreal, has to say on the matter:

-'Can the sun disrupt a power system?
Yes! The sun's activity intensifies every 11 years, creating storms on the surface of our star which, in turn, disrupt the Earth's magnetic field. These magnetic storms have the potential to cause serious problems for power transmission systems.'-
http://www.hydroquebec.com/learning/quest-ceque/nature/tempetes.html

Our interest, as a society that uses electrical technology, is best served by studying the causes and events that can and do disrupt our technology, so that we can better protect our systems from the specific causes that can disrupt them. That's a great selfish reason to study the Sun.

Nor is this field of study by NASA a new one. The first such spacecraft to study the Sun, OSO 1, was launched in 1962:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/OSO_1

The eighth one went up in 1975, and worked until 1978:
http://imagine.gsfc.nasa.gov/docs/sats_n_data/missions/oso8.html

This is a long ongoing field of study. It has AbZero to do with any recent asteroids.

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 17, 2010 10:18:40 AM PST
[Deleted by the author on Feb 17, 2010 10:20:18 AM PST]

Posted on Feb 17, 2010 1:03:49 PM PST
I need 2 new T-Shirts!
One that says,
"I was 86ed from Ruth Anne's Bar in Craig, Alaska!",
and another that says,
"I was DELETED by AMAZON!"

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 17, 2010 5:16:34 PM PST
ColdShot says:
I'm just gonna get a do-it yourself kit, and spruce up my bland t-shirts with

I was DELETED by AMAZON

I like that....

great idea....

Posted on Feb 17, 2010 5:17:33 PM PST
ColdShot says:
Thx for the info

I'm done with it

my concerns were answered....
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This discussion

Discussion in:  Science forum
Participants:  6
Total posts:  18
Initial post:  Feb 15, 2010
Latest post:  Feb 17, 2010

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