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How do I know that Schrodinger's cat is dead?


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Showing 1-25 of 54 posts in this discussion
Initial post: Jul 7, 2012 4:25:45 PM PDT
Rover says:
It's been in that box with no food or water or air for 77 years.

Bazinga!

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 7, 2012 7:53:17 PM PDT
Re OP: Because the cat is the subject of a gedankenexperiment, it is immortal; its nine lives will enable it to live forever.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 7, 2012 7:54:47 PM PDT
Rover,

How do you know that there is no food or water in it unless you have checked?

Bazinga squared!

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 7, 2012 9:03:38 PM PDT
mark says:
Did you look?

Posted on Jul 7, 2012 10:37:34 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Jul 7, 2012 10:38:25 PM PDT
Yog-Sothoth says:
How do you know it's a cat? Maybe a gerbil, or a mongoose?

IDK - "Shrodinger's Mongoose" has a certain...je ne sais quoi...

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 7, 2012 11:38:50 PM PDT
Re Yog, above: Schrodinger posited a cat. For the purpose of his gedankenexperiment, it could have been any living thing.

Posted on Jul 8, 2012 2:16:00 AM PDT
Yog-Sothoth says:
How did HE know it was a cat? Did he peek? Why would he choose a cat? It is about the state of the cat being alive or dead (or both, or neither), right? Why would he want a cat dead (or not)? Did he not like cats?

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 8, 2012 3:51:30 AM PDT
Rover says:
Because according to Schrodinger, all that's in the box is the cat and the poison.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 8, 2012 3:51:45 AM PDT
Rover says:
Didn't have to.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 8, 2012 3:57:19 AM PDT
Rover,

That is correct, but how would you know if it is alive or not unless you open the box and see if it is alive or dead?

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 8, 2012 4:57:22 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Jul 8, 2012 9:30:37 AM PDT
The "experiment" has been active for 77 years?

As Schroedinger set up the experiment, the probability of the poison being released in a given hour is 50%. Over 77 years, the probability that no poison was ever released approaches zero very closely: one half raised to about the 675,000th power. (77 years x 365.25 days x 24 hours = approximately 675,000 hours.) Probabilistically, the cat can be taken for dead with great confidence.

Also, cats have a lifespan of only about 20 years.

Oh, wait. RAS is right...

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 8, 2012 6:17:15 AM PDT
mark says:
Well, ya sorta do. Have to look. To answer your own question, that is.

But you have a point....Eric wasn't interested in the results; it could only be one of two possibilities anyway.

The whole "hellish contraption" was meant to demonstrate the absurdity of theory of QM in general, and the C.I. in particular, but any good theory must make observable predictions. To say QM allows the cat to be both alive and dead is true, but is meaningless until some knowledge is gained by observation of those predictions.

Peace.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 8, 2012 6:34:52 AM PDT
Rover says:
I said because he's been in the box for 77 years.

Posted on Jul 8, 2012 9:38:08 AM PDT
RR says:
The ASPCA broke into Schroedinger's lab and freed the cat.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 8, 2012 11:23:46 AM PDT
Rover,

I understand that, but that does not let you know if it is alive or dead unless you check in the box to see if it is alive or dead.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 8, 2012 5:23:52 PM PDT
Rover says:
False. No cat can survive 77 years in a box with no food or water.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 8, 2012 5:29:10 PM PDT
Rover,

We can test that by opening the box to see if the cat is either alive or dead. If it is alive then you are false. But we will not know until we open it up to see if either the cat is alive or dead.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 8, 2012 5:44:07 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Jul 8, 2012 7:14:17 PM PDT
nameinuse says:
You don't. He's either dead or alive depending on where the observer's location is and the observer's location is one that can't be known from a realtime human viewpoint.

The whole point is space is a product of location, time and how fast something is traveling and much what he was trying to do with making this metaphor was saying you have to establish a point of observation that can be recreated before you can even begin to measure anything that is being observed on a subatomic level.

It's so simple...How is that difficult?

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 8, 2012 5:49:51 PM PDT
mark says:
You do realize, don't you, there was no cat....no box....no photon triggering a poisonous device........right?

Posted on Jul 8, 2012 5:52:49 PM PDT
[Deleted by the author on Jul 8, 2012 5:53:01 PM PDT]

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 8, 2012 6:16:34 PM PDT
Rover says:
I understand that it was a thought experiment, yes.

Do you understand my OP was a joke?

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 8, 2012 7:11:03 PM PDT
mark says:
Do now.

Ha.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 9, 2012 2:36:29 AM PDT
Aren't they all?

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 9, 2012 5:14:07 PM PDT
Rover says:
Ad hominem! That's brilliant!

Posted on Jul 10, 2012 12:04:15 AM PDT
Ehkzu says:
If Schrodinger's cat's box is moving close enough to the speed of light relative to the sort-of-observer, the observer's 77 years could be but a moment to the trapped cat.

Alternately, how does Schroedinger's cat know you're alive?
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Discussion in:  Science forum
Participants:  23
Total posts:  54
Initial post:  Jul 7, 2012
Latest post:  Aug 5, 2012

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