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Next NASA Mars rover.


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Showing 1-25 of 49 posts in this discussion
Initial post: Jan 10, 2013 2:34:11 PM PST
Dave Vicks says:
I read that the next Rover to be sent to Mars will take off in 2020.
I beleave it will be like Curiosity.

Posted on Jan 10, 2013 3:02:43 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Jan 13, 2013 12:46:36 PM PST
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Posted on Jan 10, 2013 3:09:01 PM PST
Bill M. says:
Here are more details from the NASA website:
http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?release=2012-384

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 10, 2013 3:17:07 PM PST
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Posted on Jan 10, 2013 3:36:16 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Jan 11, 2013 3:47:23 PM PST
SinSeeker says:
This cathode ray tube that Sir William Crookes has been playing around with is a total waste of our money. What possible use could electrons be?

Quote from andthehorseirodeinontoo?'s ancestor circa 1860.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 10, 2013 4:49:45 PM PST
(®_0) says:
Why did your loving superhero Christian God create Mars? If you are so important, why did your God even bother creating a whole universe?

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 10, 2013 5:58:34 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Jan 10, 2013 9:16:09 PM PST
Doctor Who says:
It will use the same type of system, but I strongly suspect new instruments and experiments.

I also find it funny that they refer to the rover as using "proven landing system". 1 success is good, but it is far from being proven. If an XF-11 has a 90% of crashing in a 90 minute flight, 1 test flight may not reveal the design flaw.

By the way, since I have not said it yet, cool! I hope we give some attention to Venus though. You know what they say, hell hath no fury...

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 10, 2013 7:51:06 PM PST
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In reply to an earlier post on Jan 10, 2013 9:05:10 PM PST
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In reply to an earlier post on Jan 10, 2013 9:08:11 PM PST
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In reply to an earlier post on Jan 11, 2013 5:37:30 AM PST
Dutch company offering one-way rides to Mars. Program to begin colonizing Mars to be financed via reality TV. Many prominent scientists on board as advisors.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 11, 2013 8:17:13 AM PST
Bill M. says:
>>Quote from andthehorseirodeinontoo?'s ancestor circa 1870.

Hell, andthehorserearend can't even find his keyboard's "Shift" keys, much less defend ANY claim he's ever made on this forum.

Posted on Jan 11, 2013 8:23:58 AM PST
Bill M. says:
From the article:

"This mission concept fits within the current and projected Mars exploration budget, builds on the exciting discoveries of Curiosity, and takes advantage of a favorable launch opportunity."
"This mission fits within the five-year budget plan in the president's Fiscal Year 2013 budget request, and is contingent on future appropriations."

Considering how low of a percentage the NASA budget is in the first place, I don't know why some people are already whining about this being a waste of money, or resources stolen from somewhere else.

Posted on Jan 11, 2013 1:51:02 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Jan 11, 2013 2:02:00 PM PST
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In reply to an earlier post on Jan 11, 2013 2:02:21 PM PST
SinSeeker says:
Just to add some numbers to that:
"The Appropriations Committee is preparing to cut NASA's budget to the levels of the 1950′s. Not in dollar amounts but in percentage of GDP. When they do cut the budget it will surpass last years low and be at .48% of GDP."
http://www.webpronews.com/house-to-cut-nasa-budget-to-1950s-levels-2012-05

Just to clarify for the mathematically challenged, that is 0.48%, not 4.8% or 48% - 48 cents in every $100! In comparison the military budget is 4.7% of GDP.

This is worth a read:
http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/badastronomy/2007/11/21/nasas-budget-as-far-as-americans-think/#.UPCLN45H1G4
"In a just-completed study, we asked respondents what percentage of the national budget is allocated to NASA ... NASA's allocation, on average, was estimated to be approximately 24% of the national budget (the NASA allocation in 2007 was approximately 0.58% of the budget.)"

Posted on Jan 11, 2013 2:06:36 PM PST
SinSeeker says:
OH NO, Chris has turned up to spread his "knowledge." Be very afraid. Studies have shown that interacting with Chris will lower your IQ (much like watching Faux News).

If you need a good laugh to recover - have a read of this:
http://freethoughtblogs.com/pharyngula/2013/01/10/algebra-is-political-indoctrination/

Who knew the distributive property was so evil?

Posted on Jan 11, 2013 2:11:10 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Jan 11, 2013 2:36:26 PM PST
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Posted on Jan 11, 2013 3:18:36 PM PST
SinSeeker says:
While I well understand the perils of attempting a "discussion" with Chris, I will make two responses to the above hick-speak, just in case anyone actually believes what he says.

First of all, "taking them pictures of sand whats a zillion miles from nowhere" is only one of the current programs. See http://www.nasa.gov/missions/index.html for a full list. A current relevant one for my part of the world is helping firefighters battle bush fires. There is also a major program of atmospheric monitoring to help with (for example) weather forecasting, monitoring arctic ice sheets, land monitoring to improve agriculture etc.

Secondly, the added value of NASA's work has been wide ranging, from heart pumps to baby formula. See this site for a brief overview of some of the benefits.
http://www.nasa.gov/50th/50th_magazine/benefits.html

As usual Wikipedia has a good listing:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NASA_spin-off_technologies

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 11, 2013 3:48:46 PM PST
SinSeeker says:
The level of UK debt reached a peak of 260% of GDP in 1819. It had been reduced to 99.3% by 1860.
The current level of US debt is around 99.6% of GDP.

Posted on Jan 11, 2013 4:09:14 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Jan 11, 2013 4:24:46 PM PST
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Posted on Jan 11, 2013 4:24:00 PM PST
SinSeeker says:
"1991: Tapping three separate NASA-developed technologies in the design and testing of its school bus chassis, a Chicago-based company was able to create a safer, more reliable, advanced chassis, which now has a large market share for this form of transportation."
(from http://www.nasa.gov/50th/50th_magazine/benefits.html)

School buses? What's those? Our Creationist school kidz uses the horse and buddy, just like god intended! The ritzy ones have their own goats!

Posted on Jan 11, 2013 4:29:37 PM PST
SinSeeker says:
"1978: Teflon-coated fiberglass developed in the 1970s as a new fabric for astronaut spacesuits has been used as a permanent roofing material for buildings and stadiums worldwide."
(from http://www.nasa.gov/50th/50th_magazine/benefits.html)

Buildings? Roofz? What's those? Our Creationist school kidz lives in holes in the ground, just like god intended! The ritzy ones have leaves on the ground!

Posted on Jan 11, 2013 4:33:45 PM PST
SinSeeker says:
"1986: A joint National Bureau of Standards/NASA project directed at the Johnson Space Center resulted in a lightweight breathing system for firefighters. Now widely used in breathing apparatuses, the NASA technology is credited with significant reductions in inhalation injuries to the people who protect us."
(from http://www.nasa.gov/50th/50th_magazine/benefits.html)

Inhalantiution? Breathing? Whatz that? We didn't ask no fancy commie firefighters to help us! Let everyone burn, just like god intended.
Besides, we don't have fires where our Creationist school kidz lives (hard to burn down a hole in the ground).

Posted on Jan 11, 2013 4:42:26 PM PST
SinSeeker says:
"Today, the Statue of Liberty and the Golden Gate Bridge are coated in a protective material that NASA needed to invent to save its launch pads from the destructive effects of hot, humid and salt-laden air."
(from http://www.nasa.gov/50th/50th_magazine/benefits.html)

Statue of Liberty? Thatz in that fancy pants New York, init? Golden Gate Bridge? Thatz in that commie hippe gay-luving state, init? Melt 'em down for something useful like bullets.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 11, 2013 5:43:14 PM PST
SinSeeker says:
Christopher,

Here's a thought! (You remember those don't you?)

Instead of complaining about the expenses of a soft target like NASA, why not complain about the waste in the US military?

A few representative quotes:

"The Commission estimates that waste and fraud together range from $31 billion to $60 billion.1 Given the often chaotic environment in Iraq and Afghanistan, this is a conservative estimate of the money that has been lost through contingency contracting. The Commission estimates that at the mid-range, waste and fraud during contingency operations in Iraq and Afghanistan averaged about $12 million every day for the past 10 years.
Inattention to contingency contracting leads to massive waste, fraud, and abuse."
http://cybercemetery.unt.edu/archive/cwc/20110929213820/http://www.wartimecontracting.gov/docs/CWC_FinalReport-lowres.pdf

"By the government's own estimates, of the Pentagon's $300 billion annual
procurement outlays, half is for private-sector service contracts. Contractors are expensive. Although there is great debate over whether or not contacting saves money in the long term, it is quite clear that contractors do not come cheap. Salaries for various contract security guards in Iraq range from $100,000 to $200,000 per year which is double to triple what a comparable military salary would be. Additionally, the largest private contractor currently in Iraq, Halliburton's Kellogg, Brown and Root is believed to be under a contract worth $13 billion or more. That figure is approximately two and a half times the cost the United States paid for the entire Persian Gulf War fought in 1991."
http://www.dtic.mil/cgi-bin/GetTRDoc?AD=ADA479000
(Warning, written by United States Air Force Colonel who must be a commie!)

Also, this makes depressing reading:
http://www.rightingfood.com/the-sordid-link-between-us-government-popular-american-restaurants-shady-contractors-who-violate-workers-human-rights/
(Warning, commie emphasis on workers having basic human rights!)

And this:
"Boeing Co. charged the U.S. Army excessive prices for helicopter spare parts, including $644.75 for a tiny black plastic motor gear that cost another Pentagon agency $12.51, according to the Defense Department's Inspector General."
(http://seattletimes.com/html/businesstechnology/2014950380_boeingcopter04.html)

And this:
"Halliburton's questioned and unsupported costs in Iraq exceed $1.4 billion"
http://dpc.senate.gov/hearings/hearing22/jointreport.pdf
(Warning, written by United States Congress members, probably all commies!)

Yep, those "good-ole-boy prof buddies" are making the "big bucks." The ol' military contractors are living on the smell of an oily rag in comparison!
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Discussion in:  Science forum
Participants:  13
Total posts:  49
Initial post:  Jan 10, 2013
Latest post:  Feb 11, 2013

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