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The Platinum Loop - worth the wait!


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In reply to an earlier post on Apr 30, 2012 3:52:25 PM PDT
Bill M. says:
Actually I am a pretty big "fan" of what Nolan has done to the franchise. I just thought a focus on literary thrillers is more apt, in the interest of which I should mention I've just started Coma by the venerable Robin Cook.

In reply to an earlier post on May 1, 2012 2:50:18 AM PDT
Nice i like his books and his name too lol!! Im reading The Little Drummer Girl, kinda heavy but good!

Posted on May 1, 2012 6:10:39 AM PDT
Paul Farrar says:
Robin, Little Drummer Girl is ok, but if you haven't read the LeCarre classics, you might give them a shot: The Smiley Trilogy, Spy Who Came in from the Cold, Night Manager, Tailor of Panama and Russia House come to mind.

In reply to an earlier post on May 1, 2012 6:04:20 PM PDT
Yeah I'm not as interested in the Middle East scene as I am in WWII espionage but the writing is great as usual!!!!

In reply to an earlier post on May 7, 2012 7:41:56 AM PDT
Frank Haines says:
My new read is The Ghosts of Belfast (Jack Lennon Investigations #1). Hard nosed and excellent, I must say.

In reply to an earlier post on May 7, 2012 9:05:29 AM PDT
Paul Farrar says:
Frank, if you enjoy "Ghosts..." you might consider the Michael Forsythe "Dead" trilogy by Adrian McKinty or the Jack Taylor series by Ken Bruen. Imo, they were both better than Neville. I just finished a stand-alone by McKinty ("Fifty Grand"). Very different than any of the above-mentioned books in that the main character is a female Cuban cop seeking her father's killer in a posh Colorado ski resort. Yeah, quite the fish out of water.
Last night I started "Redemption Street," the second Moe Prager book by Reed Farrel Coleman. I've never been a fan of anything in New York, but am giving these a shot.

Posted on May 7, 2012 2:53:46 PM PDT
[Deleted by Amazon on May 7, 2012 5:17:02 PM PDT]

In reply to an earlier post on May 7, 2012 4:02:11 PM PDT
Frank Haines says:
@Paul Farrar, thanks for the tips. I have read some of Bruen's work but not that series, I'll certainly give it a look.
@Paul W Dawson, congrats on your books, cool titles.

In reply to an earlier post on May 7, 2012 4:06:58 PM PDT
Reviewer says:
Thanks, Frank. Paul

In reply to an earlier post on May 7, 2012 4:53:16 PM PDT
Frank Haines says:
The 87th Precinct series by Ed McBain is pretty awesome, and it takes place in a very thinly fictionalized version of New York.

In reply to an earlier post on May 8, 2012 6:54:47 AM PDT
Yep I read those back in the day good stuff!!

In reply to an earlier post on May 8, 2012 7:31:17 PM PDT
Frank Haines says:
Some people find the series dated but not me, I really appreciate the authenticity of the writing.

In reply to an earlier post on May 8, 2012 9:40:51 PM PDT
No way the good stuff never gets old!!!

In reply to an earlier post on May 9, 2012 7:47:18 AM PDT
Frank Haines says:
Old, no. Dated, yes most definitely, especially some of the earlier entries. Which isn't to say they're not still worth reading.

In reply to an earlier post on May 9, 2012 11:38:49 AM PDT
Simon P. says:
Well said, Frank.

In reply to an earlier post on May 10, 2012 8:55:12 AM PDT
Bill M. says:
I was thinking about getting involved with some of the old Jack London thrillers, many of which were written in the 60s and 70s but which tend to deal with Cold War and WWII themes. There's just something almost comforting and nostalgic about that era, with the benefit of distance and hindsight.

In reply to an earlier post on May 11, 2012 10:03:35 AM PDT
Frank Haines says:
Bill... huh??? Jack London wrong Cold War books? That's a bit hard to believe, considering he died 1916. I think perhaps you might have a different writer in mind.

In reply to an earlier post on May 11, 2012 11:26:00 AM PDT
Bill M. says:
Oops. Where is the embarrassed emoticon? I meant to type Jack Higgins. No idea where that brainfreeze came from, but at least I was 50 percent right.

In reply to an earlier post on May 11, 2012 5:02:13 PM PDT
Frank Haines says:
That makes a lot more sense. Partial credit.

In reply to an earlier post on May 11, 2012 8:31:28 PM PDT
Brain freeze is a daily occurrance ha!!

In reply to an earlier post on May 13, 2012 8:29:21 AM PDT
Simon P. says:
If you like Higgins, be sure to check out Ken Follet. He might have been mentioned before, great thriller writer of a similar style and era.

In reply to an earlier post on May 13, 2012 12:57:28 PM PDT
Bill M. says:
Yup, I have a few of his books.

In reply to an earlier post on May 13, 2012 3:36:06 PM PDT
Erin Coyne says:
It all goes back to LeCarre for me, not to sound too snobbish about the matter.

In reply to an earlier post on May 13, 2012 5:33:21 PM PDT
No snoobery when talking about a true Master!!

Posted on May 13, 2012 5:55:31 PM PDT
Paul Farrar says:
LeCarre has always been my favorite, but his works since "The Constant Gardener" have not been that impressive, imo.
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This discussion

Discussion in:  Thriller forum
Participants:  28
Total posts:  1210
Initial post:  Nov 14, 2011
Latest post:  Jul 10, 2012

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