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Fraudulent Sellers on Amazon/Ebay - Buyers Beware !!


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In reply to an earlier post on Oct 12, 2008 12:24:47 PM PDT
J. Seeliger says:
Gargester,

'Ebay/Paypal do not refund your shipping costs, even when you never received the item. I got burned a few times and finally learned my lesson. (And another two times when I returned DOA items, I had to pay for shipping to send them back!)'

Paypal will refund your entire payment if you with an Intem Not Received (INR) claim, and the seller generally must have delivery confirmation or UPS/FedEx tracking to your zip code or address to win. If you win but the seller doesn't have the money (They emptied out their account and ran off with it), Paypal or eBay might refund part of it (like up to $200), but you are still free to file a credit card chargeback for the rest. And either the PP claim or the CB would cover the entire purchase, including shipping.

If you receive an item that is Significantly Not As Described (SNAD), you usually do have to send it back (maybe not on counterfeit items), so you might lose return shipping, but on the other hand, if you buy a DOA item at a store, you have to pay for gas to drive their and return it. If you just want a refund, you are out two round trips (one to buy and one to return) and you don't get reimbursed for that.

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 12, 2008 12:47:24 PM PDT
J. Seeliger says:
Mingus,

'Just because people do it, doesn't make it right. No, it isn't illegal. But, you have stores impose restrictions like limiting the amount of an item they will sell to an individual because they are attempting to stop the kind of price inflation that people like yourself are guilty of. They know that you are going to turn around and resell the item on eBay or Amazon at a higher cost.'

They (for the most part) don't care that you are selling it for more than they are. I do realize that some low-paying employees are envious, and do care, but the corporate types, don't care what 3rd party sellers sell an item for and if an item is going for well over list, it helps it sell out faster.

' I wonder why stores would want to stop you from buying a bunch of their products. Why should it matter to them? Oh, here's a thought: Every potential customer they have come in after you to buy that item will not be able to. The customer will be frustrated and have to look for the item somewhere else or go on eBay and pay an inflated price. I guess they are trying to provide good customer relations.'

Their motives are not so pure. It is not about providing good customer relations. They are selling item cheap because they are ad items and they hope you come in and buy games, accessories and service plans to go with it.

I, OTOH, whether I am selling something for more or for less than list (and I sell a lot of things for less than the MSRP and sometimes less than Amazon) don't lie to people or badger them to buying service plans or accessories.

I had one Office Depot associate tell me the Kodak camera I was buying was only warranted for 30 days, in order to get me to buy the plan, which I didn't. I knew Kodak warranted cameras for one year, but unfortunately didn't think to look on the box where it is printed. I could have really called him out for lying on that one.

I had another OD employee deny me that they had a certain laser printer until I agreed to buy ink and paper for it. I had already checked on the computer that they had two of one laser printed and two of another laser printer. I asked about one, which showed on the computer the price of:

In-store Price $199.99
Rebates - $200
------
Final Price -$0.01

He told me that they didn't have it and then that if it is a penny, it is to be donated, but he could check some other stores for me. I told him that it is $199 in-store. He then says that maybe he'll look for me, but if he finds it am I going to buy ink and paper (so I agree). He then gets it out. I ask about the other printer too, and he denies they had it (computer showed two, so I know he's lying). But he then badgers me to buy the service plan on the first printer. I agree but had the ink and service plans returned (I only kept the printer and paper).

Similar things happen at other stores, like a friend of mine who had to buy a service plan, batteries or charger, and other games or accessories to buy a Wii at Toys R Us, and when the PS3 came out, some Best Buys were only selling them to people if they bought games and a service plan. You think that's legitimate business?

'What you are doing, is like ticket scalping as mentioned before. You buy up all the good seats and if someone really wants to see the show, they have to pay your inflated prices. Is there something wrong with that? Yes. That is why it has been outlawed in most, if not all, states.'

I already addressed how this is different in another post, as well as licensed ticket brokers who are allowed to sell them at above face value, but if you really believe that there should be government-mandated price controls on all items, including toys and video games, just like in a communist country, go ahead and write your Senator or Representative.

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 12, 2008 1:33:38 PM PDT
B. Moreno says:
If nothing else? It is a Gross waste of someones Time! Which is... In it self many things to many people:) ~Not to mention the headaches of Wondering if its going to be made right? or if You have just been burned! And of course, The need to "File a comlaint with the Governing website? More stress:(
If you do not see it as a "Scam? Can you see it as Completely 'Unscrupulous?
Something that should have No Place in any market, Not even a Cyber Mall.
AllzVanity2

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 12, 2008 2:04:11 PM PDT
J. Seeliger says:
'If nothing else? It is a Gross waste of someones Time! Which is... In it self many things to many people:) ~Not to mention the headaches of Wondering if its going to be made right? or if You have just been burned! And of course, The need to "File a comlaint with the Governing website? More stress:('

Paying more than the seller paid for an item is not "getting burned". Sellers are in business to make money, and you should expect that more often than not, you will be paying more than they did, since they have to cover the cost of the item plus the cost of selling it (Amazon or eBay fees) and any operational costs, just to break even. Only when they go above that are they making any money at all.

There is also no governing website to report it to, because in most cases, it's not against the law.

'If you do not see it as a "Scam? Can you see it as Completely 'Unscrupulous?'

Nope. Do you only have a problem with someone buying something at retail (an arbitrary number set by the MFR or retailer which might either be too high or too low, but the market decides that, based on demand.) and selling it for more, or do you have a problem with sellers who buy items on clearance and sell them, often below retail on eBay or Amazon? (Or in an example above, an xbox cable on sale from TRU).

If you say that the clearance thing is wrong too, do you have a problem with it when Big Lots! does it, buying overstock from a retailer, thereby depriving consumers of items from the store at the lowest clearance prices?

'Something that should have No Place in any market, Not even a Cyber Mall.'

Ultimately, if people are willing to pay for it, there will always be and there should always be a venue for it. Who are you to say that those who have the money and are willing to pay it for a hot toy, or a rare clearanced toy should be deprived the opportunity on eBay or Amazon? Maybe they're a professional athlete, actor/actress or business person who has more money than time to stand in line get the latest toy or video game system.

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 12, 2008 2:18:57 PM PDT
Officer Pete says:
B. Moreno has a good point. You know, there may be legitimate individual sellers on Amazon and eBay. It would not at all surprise me, however, if at least 80-90% of them are doing one of the following:

Dropshipping from a "wholesale" house which many times just operate under the guise of being legitimate wholesalers. Therefore, individuals have to be creative with their pricing because they don't have the buying power (usually on EBay this is done by overcharging for shipping).

Dropshipping from a retailer such as Target, Walmart, etc. Again, they are going to be WAY over-priced.

They found a popular item, bought as many as they could, and are hoping to be one of the few people that can offer the item for sale. In this case, they are going to increase the price 3 or 4 times.

They are advertising one product, but what you get is something a little bit different. (example: They advertise a Set of Imperial Kitchen Knives model P-1 for $100. What you actually get are a set of Imperial Kitchen Knives model P-2 and that usually retails for $60. They look similar in style but the quality of the metal is different. You might be able to prove your case to Amazon for a refund, but it would be difficult and time consuming).

There are many other situations, I'm sure.

Here's one: Some sellers offer an item and you can have it shipped at their regular method which takes 4-14 days, for example. If you want it faster, you have to pay extra for expedited shipping which is usually 3 times as much. Amazon did have a rule where sellers had to ship an item within 2 business days.

At any rate, all of these factors make the consumer research comparative prices, shipping policies, return policies... All of this is time consuming. And what an archaic way of shopping.
You can buy from Amazon with one click purchasing and have it shipped in 1-2 days! You know you can trust Amazon to do the right thing and to provide good customer service. They will take returns without a hassle. If you send them an email with a complaint, you won't get an angry, finger-pointing response. They will take care of you.

About the only individual type of sellers I trust to have a good deal are those who sell used items like the book sellers on Amazon. These people can actually find great deals and sometimes hard to find titles or out of print titles and since there are so many used book sellers, they are quite competitive.

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 12, 2008 2:25:04 PM PDT
Officer Pete says:
Seeliger helps prove my case:

"Sellers are in business to make money, and you should expect that more often than not, you will be paying more than they did, since they have to cover the cost of the item plus the cost of selling it (Amazon or eBay fees) and any operational costs, just to break even. Only when they go above that are they making any money at all...Ultimately, if people are willing to pay for it, there will always be and there should always be a venue for it. Who are you to say that those who have the money and are willing to pay it for a hot toy, or a rare clearanced toy should be deprived the opportunity on eBay or Amazon? Maybe they're a professional athlete, actor/actress or business person who has more money than time to stand in line get the latest toy or video game system."

In short, you WILL be over-paying for most items you buy from an individual on Amazon or EBay. I mean, really, who cares what the sellers want? I know what I want and that is the best prices and the best service. You're not going to get that buying from a guy on EBay or Amazon.

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 12, 2008 2:56:38 PM PDT
J. Seeliger says:
'B. Moreno has a good point. You know, there may be legitimate individual sellers on Amazon and eBay. It would not at all surprise me, however, if at least 80-90% of them are doing one of the following:

Dropshipping from a "wholesale" house which many times just operate under the guise of being legitimate wholesalers.'

The sellers in this case would still be legitimate. In any event, I mentioned my experience buying toys and electronics on eBay where all were sent by the seller. None by a dropship company. Also I think this type of thing is rare anyway. If you go onto eBay Seller Central or on most of the eBay seller support forums, like one Yahoo! Group for eBay sellers I'm on, the almost universal advise I here about drop shippers is don't use them.

' Therefore, individuals have to be creative with their pricing because they don't have the buying power (usually on EBay this is done by overcharging for shipping).'

On eBay, sellers are required to have at least a 4.3 on all DSRs. Even sellers offering free shipping (who should get 5.0 on their DSRs all the time) often end up with 4.7 . Sellers who use a drop shipper and who overcharge on shipping are not likely to last long and will receive lowered standing in searches due to lowe shipping price and shipping time DSRs (and maybe communication and description).

'Dropshipping from a retailer such as Target, Walmart, etc. Again, they are going to be WAY over-priced.'

Often, but not always. I know of one $40 item which is on clearance to $10 at Target.com. Someone can sell it for list price, and still make money without overcharging.

'They found a popular item, bought as many as they could, and are hoping to be one of the few people that can offer the item for sale. In this case, they are going to increase the price 3 or 4 times.'

By definition, this is not drop shipping. If I buy it at the store, or buy it and have it shipped to me and then reship, I am NOT drop shipping. Besides, I often buy items on clearance and resell them and they are way underpriced on Amazon, compare with the retail price, if that is your guide.

'They are advertising one product, but what you get is something a little bit different. (example: They advertise a Set of Imperial Kitchen Knives model P-1 for $100. What you actually get are a set of Imperial Kitchen Knives model P-2 and that usually retails for $60. They look similar in style but the quality of the metal is different. You might be able to prove your case to Amazon for a refund, but it would be difficult and time consuming).'

Given that Amazon almost always sides with the buyer, it is very easy. BTW, I had one item I sold, a digital camera, new in box and below retail list price. The buyer claimed it was not working, and it was returned to me and worked perfectly, but now I can't sell it as new and I estimate I lost ~$40 in value plus maybe $7-8 on shipping it.

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 12, 2008 3:19:34 PM PDT
J. Seeliger says:
'In short, you WILL be over-paying for most items you buy from an individual on Amazon or EBay. I mean, really, who cares what the sellers want? I know what I want and that is the best prices and the best service. You're not going to get that buying from a guy on EBay or Amazon.'

This is not a correct statement. Look at these items:

B0013ZEMUK Guitar Hero: On Tour

Amazon $47.99
Target $49.99 + 3.20
J&R $49.99 + $5.83

other marketplace sellers starting at $32.80 + 3.99 .

B000EGELP0 Brain Age: Train Your Brain in Minutes a Day!

Amazon $19.99
J&R / Target $19.99 + shipping

other marketplace sellers from $14.33 + 3.99

B000A2R54M Mario Kart DS

Amazon $33.99

punkykat4 $30.00 + 3.99 (same as Amazon, if you get free shipping from Amazon.)

B000ETRFRI Jakks VMIGO Console with Dog - Handheld

Amazon $25.00

lowest marketplace seller $11.25 + 5.99

Clearly, on many (perhaps most) items, it is available from a small seller (who BTW is not necessarily an individual (i.e. sole proprietorship) but might be a partnership, LLC or corporation) for less than major sellers.

Also there is no truth to it that they don't offer better service. In all likelihood, you will more often get a personalized response, not an automated one from a small seller and since they can receive FB (and some large sellers are immune to it), they are more likely to offer better service (nothing against the bigger sellers, as I mostly buy from Amazon, but in many cases, a smaller seller might be able ot help you with specific product questions or answer in advance how and when your product will be sent) and get it sent as soon as possible. Amazon may take 5-9 days if you choose super saver shipping. MPSes are required to send it within 2 business days.

In short, in some cases, Amazon or a major retailer is the best choice; in others, not.

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 12, 2008 3:40:12 PM PDT
Bon Henson says:
I agree with Pete and Moreno. You just can't trust some of these salesmen. Besides, who has the time to go through and check all of the fine print of their sales conditions? Many of them create fake accounts and leave good feedback for themselves. They also leave rave reviews for their products. It is sick what they are doing to Amazon.
I would rather just buy from a secure and proven seller. Chances are they are going to have better prices and better service anyways. For anyone who has bought from an individual on Amazon and had to go through the nightmare of trying to make a return, you probably wouldn't need any convincing.
It's funny and kind of sad because it used to be the other way around. If you went to a mom and pop store you knew you would get better and more personalized attention. That really isn't the case anymore at least online. The big companies try to be competitive with their prices and they have to give good service.

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 12, 2008 4:21:48 PM PDT
J. Seeliger says:
'Besides, who has the time to go through and check all of the fine print of their sales conditions?'

I'm not sure what sales conditions you mean. In most cases, it's 'You buy, you pay, I ship'. On Amazon most sellers are required to ship within two business days. Some sellers don't ship to certain places, like Alaska and Hawaii, because it costs more to ship there, but if you live there, you probably already know that this happens, and the worst that will happen is your order will be canceled, and your payment refunded.

If you mean on eBay, normally it is "Here are the payment methods I accept and here is when I expect to be paid". Nothing hard about that. Also, I believe eBay now requires Paypal, Propay or a merchant account on most orders, and most sellers will choose Paypal, given those choices.

'Many of them create fake accounts and leave good feedback for themselves. They also leave rave reviews for their products. It is sick what they are doing to Amazon.'

That used to happen a lot on eBay when they allowed 1 cent digital store listings, but those aren't allowed anymore. It would cost a lot of money on either eBay or Amazon to pump your FB up (and you would likely be caught and kicked off).

'I would rather just buy from a secure and proven seller. Chances are they are going to have better prices and better service anyways.'

The sellers some of you can 'individuals' are provn sellers, as noted by their FB. Mom and pop shops are as likely as big retailers to provide good service, not to mention that if everyone refused to buy from small sellers, it would be bad for the economy in already bad times and drive them out of business. I was watching on the news the other day where they interviewed a couple running a diner in Iowa where business is down and they were talking about how every time that someone comes on TV and advises people to eat out less to save money, it hurts them.

'For anyone who has bought from an individual on Amazon and had to go through the nightmare of trying to make a return, you probably wouldn't need any convincing.'

I've never had to return an item from a small seller on Amazon, but all you would have to do is ask them to provide you the return address and send it back with tracking. If they don't cooperate, you file an A-To-Z claim with Amazon. If your experience is different, please share.

'It's funny and kind of sad because it used to be the other way around. If you went to a mom and pop store you knew you would get better and more personalized attention. That really isn't the case anymore at least online. The big companies try to be competitive with their prices and they have to give good service.'

I disagree. I've had good service with most small sellers. I had poor service with buy, the largest seller on eBay (sent the wrong number of items, did not respond to any emails until I left neg FB). If you have a specific experience, why not post it?

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 12, 2008 4:50:06 PM PDT
Sasha Lewis says:
BON
Good point about reliability. The individual sellers on Amazon cannot be as trusted as the big guys like Target, Walmart, Amazon, etc. It is too risky. They could have good feedback or fake-good-feedback and decide this is the day they're going to take the money and run. Amazon could try to get your money back but it isn't guaranteed.

Today's big online companies are as brick-and-mortar as it gets.

DO NOT risk your money on these individuals.

As Dollarrite and some of these others said, "It is your own fault if you don't do the research first." That means you have to make sure you look at their policies and prices CAREFULLY. As you said, Bon, I don't want to have to spend that kind of time and then have to worry if I'm going to get my stuff or not.

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 12, 2008 7:00:49 PM PDT
J. Seeliger says:
Sasha,

'Good point about reliability. The individual sellers on Amazon cannot be as trusted as the big guys like Target, Walmart, Amazon, etc. It is too risky. They could have good feedback or fake-good-feedback and decide this is the day they're going to take the money and run. Amazon could try to get your money back but it isn't guaranteed.'

Your ignorance is astounding. First, there is no evidence that big box retailers are any more reliable than "individual sellers". I've had orders canceled by Amazon and Walmart.com for price mistakes several times. (Usually they come through, but not always). There is also no FB to give them when that happens. When a regular marketplace seller does that, they will normally receive negative FB so there would be evidence of such a pattern. Also excessive negative FB or cancellations will get you booted from selling o Amazon.

The second error you made is Amazon will guarantee your money back through an A-to-Z claim, and even if they didn't, you could file a chargeback, if you were smart enough to pay by credit card and get all of your money back. Same on using a credit card with Paypal.

I don't think you are interested in facts though, to by honest. I'm sure 8 or 10 people will vote my post unhelpful and yours helpful, even though it ignores facts.

'Today's big online companies are as brick-and-mortar as it gets.'

Trust me. Buy.com and Tigerdirect (both big box online retailers) are not high-service retailers. In one case, someone on FatWallet bought a relatively inexpensive and small item, but had a plasma or other large-screen TV send to them. They called asking about sending it back (didn't say what the item was, just that it was the wrong item). TD told them they would have to pay for it to be returned themselves and wait a certain amout of time for it to be credited back. They decided because TD was being this way, they would just keep the TV.

'DO NOT risk your money on these individuals.'

That's certainly your choice, but others might choose buying from companies other than the big box type gives them more choices, better prices, and in as good or better service.

'As Dollarrite and some of these others said, "It is your own fault if you don't do the research first." That means you have to make sure you look at their policies and prices CAREFULLY. As you said, Bon, I don't want to have to spend that kind of time and then have to worry if I'm going to get my stuff or not.'

You should always look at everyone's (including big box retailer's) prices and policies before buying. In any event, what policies are you talking about? All Amazon sellers much comply with Amazon's policies for Amazon Marketplace. You make it seem like there are policies that are out to get you.

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 12, 2008 7:46:24 PM PDT
Sasha Lewis,

Your post is not accurate. There is no difference in risk between buying from Amazon directly and buying from a "3rd Party" Amazon Marketplace Seller.

Refer to the following web page for details, but here's a direct quote: "The condition of the item you buy and its timely delivery are guaranteed under the Amazon A-to-z Guarantee". http://www.amazon.com/gp/help/customer/display.html/ref=hp_navbox_lnpriv_az?nodeId=537868

The biggest reason that Amazon Marketplace is so sucessful is that Amazon backs each transaction as if they sold the item themselves! If the buyer "takes the money and runs" (i.e. never ships your product) then you send a message to Amazon, and Amazon refunds your payment. It's quite simple!

Another *fact* to mention -- your refund is not dependent on Amazon tracking down the seller -- Amazon will "take the loss" so you don't have to. Amazon funds the guarantee program with the commission fees that Amazon collects on each order.

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 12, 2008 8:00:06 PM PDT
Bon,

Amazon guarantees your satisfaction on Marketplace orders. If you had trouble returning an item purchased from a Marketplace Seller, just contact Amazon and explain. This recently happened to me -- I purchased an item listed as "new" but received a used item missing the manuals and box. The seller did not reply to 3 emails and 2 voicemail messages I left over the course of a week. I contacted Amazon, filed an A-to-Z claim, and Amazon refunded my full payment the next day.

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 12, 2008 10:45:38 PM PDT
Matt says:
Wow, I was gone for about 10 hours today and come back to 19 new posts. Same old same old too. Thanks for defending me when I couldn't Trevor. I don't know if I'm going to post any more to this discussion though. It's really gotten out of hand and it only consists of one team debating the other team. I can't seem to make any of these people understand CRAP. It's like their brain blocks incoming information and only accepts information it already knows (i.e. people who agree with them). They can continue thinking I'm a bad person if they want, it's up to them. The fact of the matter is, even if I had posted on the eBay auctions that I purchased the items for $9.99 on sale at a local Toys R Us, I would probably still get the same amount of money for them because the people would still be saving some money, though not as much as they might if they drive to the nearest Toys R Us be it 5 miles away or 500 miles away.

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 12, 2008 10:57:32 PM PDT
[Deleted by the author on Oct 12, 2008 11:32:14 PM PDT]

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 12, 2008 11:06:20 PM PDT
Drop-Shipping is hardly a scam. It's simply affiliate marketing.

As to the $125 toy compared to $35 elsewhere, consider this. Manufacturers and wholesales offer a toy with MSRP of $125; a small retailer cost of $55; and a large retailer cost of $35:

a) The large retailer gets a much lower price and often uses such items as 'loss leaders' to draw traffic into their site and/or stores to purchase related items - thereby making their profit back even though they lost money on the first product.
b) The small retailer starts out with a higher price and a modest markup to cover advertising costs (e.g. eBay/Amazon fees) and offers the same toy for $85. Is there a better deal out there? Of course, and with a little comparative shopping the buyer would have made a better choice. The lazy buyer frequently pays a higher price than what is available somewhere else.
c) The MSRP retailer lists every toy they can at full retail price hoping for one of three things to occur: 1) The lazy buyer visits their site/listing and just buys the first item they found. 2) They work in conjunction with another seller that lists a less expensive (albeit still not the cheapest prices) toy. 3) The toy gets hyper-attention (e.g. Tickle Me Elmo) and sells out of the brick-and-mortar retail store and the frenzied buying causes parents to over-react and pay full retail on a trusted site. MSRP Seller #C may be considered by many of us Internet-savvy buyers to be unethical (or as some of you have labeled 'scammers'), but have you priced toys in your local hobby store lately? WAY over-priced by our standards, but not for the desperate grandparent who needs an exact toy shipped to their grandson by Christmas day.

> > To the primary conversation of this thread - canceling an order after purchase. It is not uncommon for suppliers to change the availability of stock or price without notifying its resellers. The reseller 'should' have eaten the cost difference and honor the purchase like I would, but those sellers are unprofessional and probably unethical. Furthermore, there are many sellers who TRY to sell on Amazon/eBay/et al only to find their products NEVER get any traffic let alone purchases. It is common for a lazy seller to list several items on Amazon, for instance, and forget to remove them months later. Suddenly, an order comes in and they no longer even have access to the product because they've sold out via another sales channel that actually works for the type of products they sell. In a panic they cancel the order. Again, the reseller 'should' have eaten the cost difference and honor the purchase like I would, but many part-time sellers don't have the foresight to 'make it right'.

Read the reviews and do some comparison shopping BEFORE you buy - don't complain about it after you've made a bad purchase.

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 13, 2008 12:19:56 AM PDT
B. Moreno says:
:)

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 13, 2008 3:05:51 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Oct 13, 2008 8:02:32 AM PDT
Kerigman says:
This was a magnificent thread. The best part about it, regardless of which side of the reseller morality fence you're on, is one simple observation:

This mostly highly-intellectual debate was created by hijacking a loony thread from Colonel Dumbsday (and by loony, I mean someone who uses 11 exclamation points in 6 sentences in his OP) and his paranoid delusions of a secret organization known as the Retail Online Masterminds of Evil (R.O.M.E., for all you G.I. Joe & M.A.S.K. fans).

BBKing: you've inspired me to make a pic that says "Drop Ship This, Sucka!" under a graphic of (the real) B.B. King with a Wii in one hand and a guitar held menacingly above his head in the other.

I think it's safe to assume that this thread has peaked, until it jumps the shark when Col. Doomy wakes up from his drunken weekend stupor and starts posting again...

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 13, 2008 7:44:53 AM PDT
Bon Henson says:
Markus and Seeliger,
I know Amazon has their A-Z Guarantee. They do try to protect us somewhat against these unscrupulous individuals. However, I wasn't so lucky.
I purchased a patio umbrella from an individual for $180 plus $46 shipping. When I received my umbrella, I found that the colors looked somewhat different from the photo, as will sometimes happen. The handle was also kind of wobbly and it looked like an inferior quality umbrella. I wrote the seller an email and requested a return. I did not hear back from them. I wrote again. Finally, 2 days later, he responded but was a little rude also. He strung me along for several days saying he had to check his stock and maybe he had something to exchange it with or he only did selling parttime from home and had to go out of town for work for a couple of days. It was always something; some kind of excuse. I kept insisting that I only wanted my money back. After a couple of weeks of this emailing back and forth I had to threaten to get Amazon involved. He finally gave me a return address. He said that I would be responsible for shipping it back to him. I gave in to this because I just wanted to be done with it. I shipped it back UPS at my own expense. After several days I heard nothing back from him. I inquired if I would be getting my refund. No response. I decided just to file a complaint with Amazon. He then responded and refunded me $180. He refused to refund my original shipping charges of $46. Amazon said that he was not responsible for refunding shipping charges. End of story. I'm out over $75 and extremely frustrated just because I wanted a patio umbrella.

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 13, 2008 8:27:12 AM PDT
Sasha Lewis says:
BON
It's terrible that you had to experience something like that. A friend of mine got burned in a very similar manner from a seller on Amazon. A lot of times, it is in the "shipping and HANDLING" where they make their money anyway. So even if they do return the amount for the item then they aren't losing money.

VANEVERA
Says: "I can't seem to make any of these people understand CRAP. It's like their brain blocks incoming information and only accepts information it already knows (i.e. people who agree with them)." LOL Hmmm, maybe it's the other way around. It's kind of like the insane man who thinks he is the only sane person in the world.

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 13, 2008 8:54:29 AM PDT
[Deleted by Amazon on Aug 25, 2011 7:58:59 AM PDT]

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 13, 2008 9:52:42 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Oct 13, 2008 9:54:01 AM PDT
Sasha Lewis says:
Here we "GOWE" again (thanks for that one BB :) It's ALWAYS the fault of the customer.....according to the Amazon/ebay SELLERS.
Well YOU ARE WRONG! Amazon's policy states that they will refund IN FULL your return and THEY WILL PAY FOR RETURN SHIPPING. I have resealed packages and shipped them back to Amazon with few questions asked. Officially, I think they say it takes up to 4 weeks for a refund but I have received refunds within 2 weeks. They have ALWAYS been friendly and helpful. I've never gotten a childish response from Amazon or any legitimate company--but I certainly have from individual sellers. If you buy from an individual on Amazon then you have to deal with them to make a return. NO THANKS!

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 13, 2008 10:33:06 AM PDT
Matt says:
This all depends on for what reason you are returning the product to Amazon. Take a look at their charts again. If you return it due to their error, such as a wrong item, or damaged item/box, then they will refund shipping, but if you refund it due to your error, such as not compatible with your device, or you found better prices elsewhere, they refund shipping but make you pay the return shipping. They take it out of the price of the item based on a percentage. They also don't refund the shipping for items that came in a package with other items if you only return one item. This has been my experience anyway.

"Here we "GOWE" again."

How intelligent and mature of you. Did your child come up with that or did you come up with it on your own? Sorry, just gagged a little. The thought of you having a son/daughter makes me fear for their mind.

Just a quick question, who will you be voting for this year? I know it's off topic, but just think it'd be interesting if you're voting for who I think you are.

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 13, 2008 10:41:43 AM PDT
Gunny D says:
Dont count on PayPal protecting you. They will TRY to get a refund for you, but there is no guarantee. I have a claim with them with an EBAY seller who took my money then no product was sent. I have YET to get my money even though PayPal found in my favor for the claim because the seller never responded. The Seller then posted I never paid and I was a deadbeat buyer. Beware of Worlds_Gems on EBAY.
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Discussion in:  Toys forum
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Initial post:  Oct 5, 2008
Latest post:  Oct 14, 2014

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