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Does it matter to you whether a toy or game is made in the USA?


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Showing 176-200 of 595 posts in this discussion
In reply to an earlier post on Apr 14, 2012 11:17:15 AM PDT
suebsewing says:
I am always looking for products made in the USA, but they are far and few between. Sue

Posted on Apr 15, 2012 1:02:49 PM PDT
Ashlin's Mom says:
If I have a choice between "Made in USA" and "Made in China", I always choose "Made in USA" even at an extra cost. I wish you and your brother much success with the game!

Posted on Apr 15, 2012 6:13:35 PM PDT
Not at all. I buy most of my collectibles from Japan.

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 15, 2012 7:52:03 PM PDT
h says:
Glenn, I think it is in your best interest to produce in China after your product gains awareness and demand. Chinese manufacturing is superior to manufacturing in the USA. Many items in the USA would be manufactured by machine whereas those same products in China are hand-made with a smaller percentage of the product components machine manufactured. Unfortunately, many whom attempt to manufacture in the USA do so for the intrinsic value of helping US manufacturing but this is only perceived and the help is never realized. The Chinese have low cost labor because of their governance structure and the Chinese people are simply are willing or not, living at lower standards than Americans. US labor will remain at a high cost until those in the manufacturing workforce perform the job at a similar wage to the Chinese laborers. If we try to prop up US manufacturing in certain areas just for the sake of saving what should be dead anyway we are doing our country a disservice as that "effort" and "capital" (which is FINITE) can be input into areas with a higher likelihood of success for USA, such as technology. Let dead industries/sub industries (e.g. toy manufacturing) die so they can be replaced and the US can master the next new industry with greater intensity (when capital is used for purposes that produce the biggest gain for US Economy). Until the US laborer is willing to live like the Chinese laborer, without an i phone, without family outings to the movie theater and applebees, without the beach vacations and the lavish Christmas, without the numerous holidays, the Chinese manufacturing industries will always have an advantage that will not be overcome except by massive advances in technology. If we want to live like we do, we need to be constantly adapting/innovating, just like amazon crushed the mom + pop shops that thought they could live at the same standard and go through the motions, now they are acting as if Amazon price checker is something wrong when it is they who should not have had the "entitlement" attitude.

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 15, 2012 9:11:44 PM PDT
Blentin says:
AppleTV will change that.

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 15, 2012 11:57:53 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Apr 15, 2012 11:59:44 PM PDT
In response to your post -
Honest Communication says:
Glenn, I think it is in your best interest to produce in China after your product gains awareness and demand. Chinese manufacturing is superior to manufacturing in the USA. Many items in the USA would be manufactured by machine whereas those same products in China are hand-made with a smaller percentage of the product components machine manufactured. Unfortunately, many whom attempt to manufacture in the USA do so for the intrinsic value of helping US manufacturing but this is only perceived and the help is never realized. The Chinese have low cost labor because of their governance structure and the Chinese people are simply are willing or not, living at lower standards than Americans. US labor will remain at a high cost until those in the manufacturing workforce perform the job at a similar wage to the Chinese laborers. If we try to prop up US manufacturing in certain areas just for the sake of saving what should be dead anyway we are doing our country a disservice as that "effort" and "capital" (which is FINITE) can be input into areas with a higher likelihood of success for USA, such as technology. Let dead industries/sub industries (e.g. toy manufacturing) die so they can be replaced and the US can master the next new industry with greater intensity (when capital is used for purposes that produce the biggest gain for US Economy). Until the US laborer is willing to live like the Chinese laborer, without an i phone, without family outings to the movie theater and applebees, without the beach vacations and the lavish Christmas, without the numerous holidays, the Chinese manufacturing industries will always have an advantage that will not be overcome except by massive advances in technology. If we want to live like we do, we need to be constantly adapting/innovating, just like amazon crushed the mom + pop shops that thought they could live at the same standard and go through the motions, now they are acting as if Amazon price checker is something wrong when it is they who should not have had the "entitlement" attitude.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Dear HC,

While I appreciate you taking the time to tell me that you "think it is in your best interest to produce in China after your product gains awareness and demand", I couldn't disagree more. I think we need to fight for every job and every dollar that we can keep here in America. Why should we let any more industries die? What if China started making cars and we all decided to let the auto industry die? What if we closed down every factory and manufacturing plant in America and let China make everything? If we don't start caring, we WILL be living like "the Chinese laborer, without an i phone, without family outings to the movie theater and applebees, without the beach vacations and the lavish Christmas, without the numerous holidays" as you said we should. We used to be a great country...I hate seeing what is happening to us. I hope others will weigh in on this.

Best regards,
Glenn

Posted on Apr 16, 2012 3:02:00 AM PDT
First and foremost to me is quality. If something seems cheaply made or if it has bad reviews (whether for being poorly made or being poor in concept or something that ends up not being liked/used) I do not buy it. It happens that a lot of times things made in the US are of good quality, and that most of the cheap crap I see at the 99 cent store and the like are made in China. As a result, when I see "Made in the USA" it gives me the perception of "probably a quality item" unless my research proves otherwise. If I have a choice of similar items, and the best quality/reviewed option costs less than 20 percent more than the cheaper good-but-not-the-best choice I'll probably go with that. If the best reviewed option is outrageously more expensive than the good-but-not-the-best choice, I will not go for the best. Also, if I am buying on line, I want to see pictures of the item from different views, showing everything I will be getting clearly, as well as a thorough description of the item (size/weight, quantity for price, a list of included items, where it was made, name of the company that makes it, use/purpose, color, options, what it's made of, or anything else as it applies).

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 16, 2012 9:27:53 AM PDT
I dunno if anyone else has noticed, but it seems like the women on this site (according to their "pen" names) go for the "keep jobs in the usa" philosophy/practice while most of the male or neutral replies have the opposite opinion, wonder why is that?? (Heidi/Spunky/Patches=female) Any one?

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 16, 2012 9:29:44 AM PDT
Huh?

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 16, 2012 12:29:48 PM PDT
[Deleted by the author on Apr 16, 2012 12:30:56 PM PDT]

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 16, 2012 12:41:40 PM PDT
Dawn Talley says:
You asked two questions that either way require two different answers---for most people anyway.
Does it matter...made in the USA? For me, the answer is YES.
Do I mind paying more? The answer is NO.
I think that in the long run, buying things made in China costs us more, because we all pay when people don't have jobs here.

Posted on Apr 16, 2012 1:19:12 PM PDT
h says:
US manufactures many types of products. Our motivation to buy US manufactured products should be limited to that specific type of manufacturing that is likely to survive and thrive for the long-term. I have no doubt that US manufacturing is dominant with specific types of products while other products it is on the fast decline and/or nearing distinction. The US manufacturing of those products that are in severe decline should not be supported because we Americans have a limited amount of capital and cannot just throw money at anything in the name of saving US jobs. If we had an infinite of capital, sure, throw money at everything, but since we do not, we must make wise decisions and be realistic about how our money effects the US jobs. If I incur a higher price for a product I am going to resell, at the expense of my FAMILY, manufactured by a US company in a US industry on the heavy decline, I am doing a disservice to my family and my country because the alternative use of that saved money can go toward something that will actually realize a positive outcome, or at least increase the likelihood of this result. We are not going to save jobs of MANY manufacturers. It is basic math. If the worker in china is willing to live at the bare minimum with low wages, a US worker MUST live close to those standards in order to produce the same value to the end user.
Real life example, I am not going to keep going to Bill's TV and Stereo up the street and pay an extra $200 just so that he can have his i phone and order beer and wings with his buddies on Sunday, and nice home cooked meals. Sorry Bill, you need to adapt, Amazon crushes your prices and your business model will be failing soon enough if it is not already. Bill, I will help you realize you need to do whats best for your family and move on or try something new, start sacrificing like those Chinese, Canned Food diet only, start saving money... by not buying your high-priced products. I know its your passion, and mom told you to love what you do and everything will work out, but this is 2012, you are delaying the inevitable and I will not contribute to you dragging this failing business out, having longer term, more negative, consequences for you family. Lastly, your Friday night pizza night with your family is not my priority, my priority is my family and that extra 200 I save by going to amazon, or by buying from China, is going toward my family, my most important interest.

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 17, 2012 12:55:23 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Apr 17, 2012 12:56:48 AM PDT
Dawn you posted this:
"You asked two questions that either way require two different answers---for most people anyway.
Does it matter...made in the USA? For me, the answer is YES.
Do I mind paying more? The answer is NO.
I think that in the long run, buying things made in China costs us more, because we all pay when people don't have jobs here."
-------------------------
My response:

Dawn,

I couldn't have said it better myself!

Thanks and best regards,
Glenn

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 17, 2012 10:01:52 AM PDT
Dear Honest Communications, I believe U honestly believe U are helping your family by the $200 U save buying foreign made. But if your family really is your priority, who is going to give your children, grandchildren, etc. jobs if we continue to avoid buying USA-made? These American companies, large and small, spawn other businesses that service their needs, providing yet more jobs.

Chances are if we don't do more to support USA-made companies we're all going to end up having our children, their children, and their children's children living with us forever. Maybe you'd be happy with that, but somehow I don't think so.

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 17, 2012 10:06:00 AM PDT
Heidi, Somehow I don't think her children would be happy with that either. :)

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 17, 2012 10:17:45 AM PDT
I DO check the labels on everything I buy, and contact the manufacturer if I need to. Some electronics R assembled here, so it's not a complete loss of jobs.

Posted on Apr 17, 2012 11:36:55 AM PDT
YES, people do care about buying products Made in the USA. I have a business I'm about to launch selling ONLY products Made in the USA. We need to support the US economy and create jobs then we will be in a position to help others.

Keep making the game here and promote the fact it is Made in the USA.

Sherry Holdridge
CEO, OHSAY USA

Posted on Apr 17, 2012 12:20:37 PM PDT
Shu Liu says:
i personally don't care at all, i see no reason not to buy a product made in China. I mean whats wrong with that? I don't understand why people think that just because a product is made in the USA, its all better than an overseas product. Honestly, i think a lot of you people are darn right racist. American products are no better than chinese made ones!

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 17, 2012 12:49:52 PM PDT
DisplacedMic says:
it's nothing to do with race, genius - it's to do with experience.
In my experience, many many products made in China are of vastly inferior quality - but are generally much cheaper.
That's the trade off. I don't particularly buy into "ONLY BUY AMERICAN - SAVE OUR JOBS" nonsense - but i can certainly see why people would avoid Chinese products in favour of something that costs a bit more but will last longer.

That's not to say that everything coming out of China is of low quality - but the mass-produced lower-end tools, equipment and general merchandise certainly are.

Top this with a reputation of unfair business practices, corruption and poor quality control and you have an attitude that China exports quite a lot of junk. It's a reputation that is well-earned and crying racism as a result is idiotic.

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 17, 2012 1:31:46 PM PDT
She. It is not about quality, it is about taking jobs out of America. If you live in America you should support America.

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 17, 2012 1:48:30 PM PDT
DisplacedMic says:
Nope. simple economics - trade benefits BOTH parties. there is nothing wrong with buying foreign goods.
if you want to "support America" how about you get behind a platform in which small businesses aren't buried under silly nickel and dime licensure and then taxed out of existence.

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 17, 2012 3:47:46 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Apr 17, 2012 3:52:23 PM PDT
h says:
Dear Heidi, I am going to prioritize my family and spend the $200.00 on my family rather than buy toys manufactured in the US at a greater cost $200.00. When I save that money and use it to DIRECTLY BENEFIT my child, I know exactly where and what my money is being used for. The alternative scenario is to deny my child the $200 just so that MAYBE I will contribute to saving 1 U.S. company from going out of business this year, even though it could all be for nothing because that business had a business model that was going to fail eventually anyway. Keyword is MAYBE. MAYBE my expenditure on US products will contribute to saving a US manufacturing in a particular industry e.g. manufacturing small toys or MAYBE my expenditure is just delaying the inevitable? Now lets see, do I put my money with the direct benefit to the child or to an uncertainty? Ding Ding Ding, Family first! Certainty First!! I am gonna save money and put it towards my child's future/benefit. Is my money going to some company with an exorbitant pension plan, or a small business owner who is making mortgage payments on a house they should never have bought? You see what I am talking about, you need to understand this money cannot be thrown at US companies and lead you to believe your efforts are actually benefiting your children more than just saving the money in the first place. I am not going to tell my children to go to school to eventually enter a job where the wages are much lower in another country for that specific job, just like I would not tell my children to have a major in Art History. I hope people directly benefit their child and save the money, rather than betraying their child and pay increased prices just for the sake of "American Companies".... Do you see where you said "Chances are, if we dont do more support of USA mane companies".. you do not know, so you are choosing to put your money into something where the positive effect may or may not be realized. I think I will with the certainty of putting the saved money in my child's college fund where i know it is being put toward an education that will serve my child. I actually have a sense of loyalty to my children to do the best I can for them, including trying to avoid them taking out student loans so that they can have a better life in their 20s. Somehow I think my child would rather I buy from china and decrease their reliance on student loans. Be loyal to your family, save the money and use it for their DIRECT benefit. Shop Amazon and save the money for your kids, dont go to Billy's Computer Shop up the street and pay the extra money just so he can have a couple more beers with the boys on sunday while watching football.

Posted on Apr 17, 2012 7:55:14 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Apr 17, 2012 7:57:39 PM PDT
First of all, "Made in America" does not necessarily mean "Made by an army of American workers". There are few manufactured goods that still require being handmade, and foreign labor is appealing not just because it is cheaper than domestic labor, but because it is also cheaper than automated manufacturing. Manual labor is largely obsolete, and holding on to obsolete practices is likely to lead to be being annihilated by those who stay with the times. The high unemployment rate is just a natural result of the population exceeding what is needed to do the required work. If we could see the population return to the size it was five centuries ago through a reduced birthrate and older generations dying of old age, we might see society reach a point where unemployment is low in spite of manual manufacturing being a dead industry.

Also, give it another ten years, and 3D printing technology might advance to the point that 3D printers can produce better quality than the best that injection-molded ABS can offer at an overall lower cost.

As for the original question, all I care about when I buy toys is the quality and that they appeal to my tastes. As it stands, my favorite toy maker is Meffert's Puzzles, whose owner is German, is headquartered in Hong Kong, and their puzzles are manufactured in Southern China. I would also like to note that Meffert's products are not the cheap garbage the Chinese have become infamous for, and that I, and lot of my fellow puzzle enthusiasts have much respect for Meffert and other high-quality Chinese Manufacturers(Mf8 being the most prolific along side Meffert's) while being highly critical of the chinese manufacturers who produce cheap knock-offs of these high-quality puzzles.

After Chinese imports that violate the stereotype that China only produces cheap junk, I would say the second largest portion of my collection is of Japanese origin.

Also for the record, American Toy Makers make nothing that interests me, so I get none of my dollar votes.

Posted on Apr 17, 2012 10:47:49 PM PDT
Tiny D says:
Well, I am a quality man. So when I buy my toys, I definitely do NOT buy from china, nor usa (sorry, the quality just aint that great, also only concerning toys). I get them from japan, those guys are freaks! They are passionate about almost everything they make, whether it be robots, cars, or plastic naked chicks!

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 17, 2012 11:14:39 PM PDT
Tiny D says:
It depends on what you're buying from china. drywall? nope it sucks, dolls? nope it also sucks and is full of lead. soy-sauce? nope, its actually just grounded up human hair. The only thing we can really get from china at a good quality is ipads and boot-leg clothes.
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