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What TV Series was Ahead of its Time and it took other series 10-20-30-40 years to catch up?


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Showing 76-100 of 109 posts in this discussion
Posted on May 10, 2011 2:51:01 PM PDT
Miami Vice brought music to the forefront of tv shows. Songs as opposed to scores hadnt been done to that extent before and I dont think any other show captured its decade quite as well as Miami Vice did the 80s.

In reply to an earlier post on May 10, 2011 8:49:55 PM PDT
Green Meanie says:
Not Music but MTV style edits.Family Ties,Square Pegs, Silver Spoons, 21 Jump Street, Greatest American Hero, Fame all brought Music to the forefront of tv shows.

In reply to an earlier post on May 10, 2011 8:58:07 PM PDT
Let's not forget that Bob Rafelson and Bert Schneider created and produced "The Monkees," which aired on NBC from 1966-68. The sitcom was one of the earliest to emphasize music in each episode. Plus, the romps were certainly an influence on future music television, especially MTV.

In reply to an earlier post on May 10, 2011 9:03:35 PM PDT
Green Meanie says:
Ozzy and Harriett was earlier than that with Rick Nelson doing Music Videos.

In reply to an earlier post on May 10, 2011 9:19:16 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on May 10, 2011 9:21:50 PM PDT
I believe Rick's first performance on "The Adventures of Ozzie and Harriet" was a cover of the Fats Domino song "I'm Walkin'."

As for "The Monkees," the way those romps were edited, and the pacing of the show, certainly made it a precursor to MTV. It was one of the earliest marriages of music and visual on American television.

Posted on May 10, 2011 9:32:09 PM PDT
BRICKBATS says:
Frank's Place was a dramedy before there were dramedies ... no annoying laff-trak, great acting and inventive storylines. (Sigh) - I miss New Orleans.

Posted on May 10, 2011 9:40:14 PM PDT
Laust Cawz says:
There was at least one dramedy before "Frank's Place"--"Joe Bash":

http://unpopculture.freehostia.com/joe_bash.html

Both shows came before the "dramedy" concept really took off with "The Wonder Years", "Thirtysomething", "Hooperman", etc.

Posted on May 10, 2011 11:16:11 PM PDT
Someone mentioned "Big Blue Marble" I loved that as a kid!

My list: The Twilight Show
Six Feet Under
Arrested Developement
The Cosby Show
The Office (BBC)
The Real World first season
Good Times
The Simpsons
The Royale Family (BBC)

In reply to an earlier post on May 11, 2011 11:15:09 AM PDT
Green Meanie says:
How old is Hee Haw or the Lawrence Welk Show?Even American Bandstand?

Posted on May 11, 2011 1:15:38 PM PDT
Blamstermash says:
Twilight Zone

Outer Limits

The Smother Brothers Comedy Hour - Steve Martin, Pat Paulsen, Mason Williams, Glen Campbell and many others made appearances on this show. The show was politically bold and very satirical.

Saturday Night Live(Enough said!)

Posted on May 11, 2011 1:35:39 PM PDT
Blamstermash says:
One more(famous last words):

60 Minutes

In reply to an earlier post on May 11, 2011 4:00:21 PM PDT
60 Minutes-- excellent show. Even though that ticking makes me anxious. They should have used the soft grandfather clock sound instead of a stopwatch/timebomb noise, lol.

In reply to an earlier post on May 11, 2011 4:17:05 PM PDT
Re: Big Blue Marble

I absolutely loved this series when I was young (back in the dinosaur days of the 1970's). They should redo that show for today's kids: give them a taste of the day in the life of a kid in another country, be it Sweden or Austria or China or Egypt or England.

Posted on May 11, 2011 7:48:53 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on May 11, 2011 7:50:55 PM PDT
Sesame Street

This series debuted in 1969, and was revolutionary in its mix of education, information and entertainment for children. This show has been important and extremely influential for over four decades. The Children's Television Workshop has made a huge impact on multiple generations of kids, and "Sesame Street," its flagship program, helped make household names of Jim Henson and his Muppets.

Posted on May 11, 2011 8:35:59 PM PDT
Green Meanie says:
I'm more of the 3-2-1...Contact, Electric Company Generation.

Posted on May 11, 2011 9:05:50 PM PDT
Laust Cawz says:
Was never too familiar with "...Contact", but always preferred "The Electric Company" to "Sesame Street". What's disgusting is how the new PBS show calls itself "The Electric Company", while bearing virtually no resemblance to the original show. Updates are one thing, but that's just too much!

In reply to an earlier post on May 11, 2011 9:15:01 PM PDT
Green Meanie says:
I miss the Muppet Show.The new Electric Company looks like a Kid' N' Play Kids Show.There are a few more that I grew up on The Powerhouse,Pacific Bridges,Marlo and The Magical Factory.

In reply to an earlier post on May 11, 2011 9:20:09 PM PDT
Glad to see another mention of "Sesame Street" here. We cannot underestimate Jim Henson's positive influence on television and film. His creativity and humor will continue on and on through future generations.

There are few children's entertainers who made such an important impact, and at the same time created genuine quality entertainment.

I grew up on "Sesame Street", then "The Muppet Show", and I still am very fond of the movies "The Great Muppet Caper" and "Muppets from Space". Good family fun.

Posted on May 11, 2011 9:24:54 PM PDT
Laust Cawz says:
I remember a sketch on "Sesame Street" where Kermit is asked what frogs' favorite foods are--he begins responding, "Fried chicken & pizza...", then grimaces when he's told what REAL frogs eat.

In reply to an earlier post on May 11, 2011 10:24:32 PM PDT
I remember that-- so funny.

Posted on Aug 10, 2011 7:34:41 PM PDT
Green Meanie says:
I remember Flash Gordon from the 1950's being innovative by utilizing actual bombed buildings in Germany.

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 20, 2013 4:53:46 PM PST
mack says:
I agree All in The Family. I still laugh at the repeats till today. They will alway's be funny & watch it over & over!

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 20, 2013 4:55:28 PM PST
mack says:
Was a fan of Dark Shadows! Baranabas Collins! Quentin Collins! The orginial Star Trek for sure!

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 22, 2013 8:48:52 PM PST
Ehkzu says:
Re: Hercules and Xena Warrior Princess

These, plus their even better god-children Buffy/Angel, never got the credit they were due from the multitude of people afflicted with Good Taste.

People with Good Taste expect Serious Shows that are "realistic" in their settings. Xena was fearless in particular in its mix of everything from broad farce to dead-serious themes. But the Good Taste types believed that worthiness only pertained to admittedly great shows like Homicide: Life on the Street.

Seems like comitradgedy--the apex of art--is too complex for most people to grasp.

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 1, 2013 12:28:36 PM PST
[Deleted by the author on Mar 1, 2013 12:32:48 PM PST]
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Discussion in:  TV Series forum
Participants:  18
Total posts:  109
Initial post:  May 1, 2011
Latest post:  Mar 6, 2013

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