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NRA Does Not Understand Irony, Releases iOS Shooting Game


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Initial post: Jan 14, 2013 3:56:21 PM PST
Waldo says:
Hey, remember last month when that unspeakably horrible event happened in Connecticut? Well, the NRA apparently doesn't. You see, the organization's Wayne LaPierre placed much of the blame on violent video games, singling out titles like Bulletstorm, Splatterhouse, and Mortal Kombat in a reactionary press conference. Now, less than a month after the shooting in Newtown, the company has released a shooting game for iOS.

NRA: Practice Range is now available for iPhone and iPad, and offers virtual shooting ranges, nine firearms, and all sorts of NRA information and resources. We've reached out to publisher Medl Mobile to see if they have any comment regarding the apparent hypocrisy, and will update this story if they get back to us with an official word.

http://www.gameinformer.com/b/news/archive/2013/01/14/nra-does-not-understand-irony-releases-ios-shooting-game.aspx

Posted on Jan 14, 2013 4:03:56 PM PST
DVvM says:
What's wrong with releasing a game that features people using firearms in a responsible manner against non-living targets?

Isn't that the sort of thing we want people to do with firearms?

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 14, 2013 4:10:28 PM PST
AJF says:
Why do we want people with firearms at all?

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 14, 2013 4:12:03 PM PST
So we can sell them bullets.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 14, 2013 4:12:23 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Jan 14, 2013 4:15:01 PM PST
DVvM says:
I received my first firearm (a 20 gauge bolt-action Mossberg shotgun) for Christmas when I was 12. In my youth I was very active in competitive shooting sports. I think that they teach people much more responsibility with and respect for firearms than do video games.

Kids are going to like stuff with guns in it anyway, you might as well expose them to contexts in which guns are used responsibly and appropriately.

Posted on Jan 14, 2013 4:13:33 PM PST
In spite of widespread confusion, irony and hypocrisy are actually not synonyms.

Posted on Jan 14, 2013 4:13:38 PM PST
T-Hype says:
And so another firearms discussion begins.

For my part I think its weird that they, of all organizations, released this as their name is being slung around. Of course, nobody has accused the NRA of being a great public relation organization these last few weeks either.

I think there is some irony in this story, but I can see people like DVvM dissecting it to the point of it being perfectly normal and responsible as well.

Shrug, no right answer with this issue.

Posted on Jan 14, 2013 4:14:43 PM PST
I used to be part of the NRA, then I took a bullet to the face.

Posted on Jan 14, 2013 4:15:00 PM PST
Is this game on the same level as that one where the player had to reenact the shootings at Virginia Tech? I don't think so.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 14, 2013 4:16:27 PM PST
DVvM says:
I wouldn't honestly be surprised if the reason that this game was released is that at the Biden summit the other day someone suggested there be more video games that show firearms being used in a responsible, non-violent context.

So the NRA obliged.

I mean, I can't actually take issue with the idea of having more games portray responsible non-violent use of firearms.

Posted on Jan 14, 2013 4:22:50 PM PST
sounds like a boring ass game.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 14, 2013 4:23:40 PM PST
T-Hype says:
"So the NRA obliged."

If I was consulting the NRA I would tell them to get their damned name out of the media until this thing dies down... that's what I mean by weird.

I understand what you're saying, but I have to wonder about the things they say and do sometimes.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 14, 2013 4:27:30 PM PST
DVvM says:
The only reason the NRA's name is in the media to begin with, is that they put it there.

I mean, they have a point to be made about how most media (movies and video games mostly) does not portray responsible or correct firearm use, nor does it reflect how the overwhelming majority of how NRA members use their firearms.

Now I certainly don't believe that violent video games cause violence, but I'm absolutely in favor of video games showing a much broader scope about firearm use than the current "Shooting bad guys is fun" (and for chrissakes if you're going to make a war game, can you at least have people handle their guns correctly?)

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 14, 2013 4:30:53 PM PST
Maybe someone could create a videogame that takes the player through the horrifying and miserable aftermath of what actually occurs if you shoot someone under circumstances that aren't clearly self-defense.

Like the year spent in jail awaiting trial, followed by days of boredom spent in a courtroom where the victim's family weeps for their loss and everyone speaks of you in the third person as though you are a monster, and then years of panic and despair as you sit in prison, trying to avoid having the crap beaten out of you on a near daily basis by psychopaths, waiting for enough time to pass that you have your chance to go before the parole board to convince them that you are reformed and should be released, while your children grow up without you.

The game should seize control of your gaming device for a period of 25 to life.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 14, 2013 4:35:48 PM PST
I'd buy that game. The bathroom scene would be terrifying.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 14, 2013 4:36:52 PM PST
DVvM says:
I honestly think one of the best way to get kids to think "guns aren't really that cool" is to actually take them hunting and have them kill something (something they're supposed to kill at least.) That adds a real degree of sobriety to the whole notion of gun use: something is dead because you squeezed the trigger.

If you take them hunting and they really like it, then at least they're going to have something to do with guns that doesn't involve hurting other people.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 14, 2013 4:51:36 PM PST
Until they play The Most Dangerous Game.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 14, 2013 5:09:32 PM PST
This game isn't really violent.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 14, 2013 5:13:33 PM PST
The NRA just came out and said they have enough votes in Congress to block a new assault weapons ban. I get what they mean, but hearing someone from the NRA say it is a bit unsettling.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 14, 2013 5:14:39 PM PST
"can you at least have people handle their guns correctly?"

Do you want some recent examples from a game I just played?

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 14, 2013 5:16:23 PM PST
Heh, add prison to the list of "things media cannot realistically portray."

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 14, 2013 5:22:34 PM PST
"Guns don't kill people. Video games, the media, and Obama's budget kill people." - Wayne LaPierre NRA

Anyone who is stupid enough to say something as completely retarded as the above is not capable of understanding much of anything.

And yeah, that is a real quote.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 14, 2013 5:38:59 PM PST
aidenraine says:
guns don't kill people. but neither do video games. unless you shoot them out of a custom made disc launcher that fires them at high speed. that would be awesome. the media and obama's budget, that's debatable.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 14, 2013 5:59:24 PM PST
JRPG Launchers?

Posted on Jan 14, 2013 6:10:36 PM PST
Celebs celebrated their violent films the other night with an award ceremony where Lady Gaga wore a bra with Uzi's.
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Discussion in:  Video Games forum
Participants:  33
Total posts:  188
Initial post:  Jan 14, 2013
Latest post:  Jan 17, 2013

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