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Charles Darwin Garnered 4,000 Votes in a Georgia County


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Showing 1-25 of 29 posts in this discussion
Initial post: Nov 12, 2012 10:30:27 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Nov 12, 2012 10:31:30 AM PST
http://newsfeed.time.com/2012/11/12/charles-darwin-garnered-4000-votes-in-a-georgia-county/#ixzz2C1O5Y9hP

Which historical figure would you want to represent you in Congress? In one Georgia county, the answer was resoundingly clear: Charles Darwin. The 19th century British naturalist garnered more than 4,000 votes from residents of Athens-Clarke County in a congressional race last week, the Athens Banner-Herald reported.

Thousands of Athens-Clarke residents voted for Darwin as their district's House representative as a vote of protest against the GOP candidate, Rep. Paul Broun, who was running for reelection unopposed, according to the paper. Broun, who has held the 10th Congressional District seat for five years, stirred up controversy in September when he gave a speech that denounced evolution, embryology and the Big Bang theory. He said evolution and similar scientific theories are "lies straight from the pit of hell."

"It's lies to try to keep me and all the folks who were taught that from understanding that they need a savior," Broun said.

Despite the scores of symbolic votes for Darwin - who first developed the scientific argument for the theory of evolution via natural selection - Broun received 16,980 votes in the county, handily defeating his long-deceased contender, the Athens Banner-Herald noted.

(MORE: Huckabee's Texas Evolution)

The paper reported that other Georgian counties also collected some votes for Darwin, though several areas would not actually tally votes for him because he was not considered a "properly certified write-in candidate." A campaign to accumulate mass symbolic support for Darwin, who died in 1882, sprung up after Broun's controversial anti-science speech to a church group in Hartwell, Ga. Jim Leebens-Mack, a University of Georgia plant biologist, launched a "Darwin for Congress" Facebook page that states, "We have an alternative to Paul Broun. Vote Charles Darwin for Congress as a Write-In candidate for Georgia's 10th District!"

Leebens-Mack told the Athens Banner-Herald that the number of votes for Darwin was more than he'd anticipated, although it was "in the ballpark." He said the write-ins made it clear that Broun is "vulnerable" and is not a shoo-in for more re-elections to Congress. Broun first ascended to the House in a special 2007 election, and then he was reelected in 2008 and 2010. He won again this year in the reconfigured 10th District, which was re-drawn as part of congressional reapportionment and contains half of Athens-Clarke County, according to the Banner-Herald. Broun received 209,917 votes throughout the District.

Non-Darwin write-in votes were also cast, Leebans-Mack said, and locals wrote in names including "Big Bird" and "Bill Nye, The Science Guy" as well as less corporeal candidates like "Anyone but Broun" and "Anyone Else." Independent candidate Brian Russell Brown, the best-finishing legitimate write-in candidate, garnered 200 votes in Athens, the Banner-Herald reported.

(MORE: In France, a Muslim Offensive Against Evolution)

"I can't ever remember seeing a [write-in ballot] report that long," Athens-Clarke County Elections Supervisor Gail Schrader said after write-in data was released on Thursday.

The Darwin campaign sought to draw attention to the fact that Broun serves on the House Committee on Science, Space and Technology, despite his ultraconservative leanings, the Huffington Post pointed out.

Of course, Broun is not alone in his convictions. A Gallup poll from June found that 46 percent of Americans believe in creationism, or the idea that God created human beings fully formed within the last 10,000 years.

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funny and not funny at the same time

edit: sorry for the lack of OT

Posted on Nov 12, 2012 10:31:41 AM PST
FOGE says:
I think Optimus Prime is the leader we need for America 2016.

Posted on Nov 12, 2012 10:32:28 AM PST
Benpachi says:
I'd vote for Martin Sheen, he plays a great president.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 12, 2012 10:33:04 AM PST
Ice King says:
It sounds like anyone who wants an easy seat in congress should move to this district and run against the fool.

Posted on Nov 12, 2012 10:37:34 AM PST
McAwesomeo says:
One day my write-in votes will matter and Batman will represent me in higher government.

Posted on Nov 12, 2012 10:42:28 AM PST
Marc S says:
I'm surprised 4000 people in Georgia can spell.

Posted on Nov 12, 2012 10:42:45 AM PST
Soulshine says:
It was funny until "Broun serves on the House Committee on Science, Space and Technology." Then it was sad.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 12, 2012 10:44:59 AM PST
Benpachi says:
It works better if you say something like "I'm surprised 4,000 people in Georgia know who Charles Darwin is".

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 12, 2012 10:51:11 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Nov 12, 2012 10:51:19 AM PST
Ice King says:
How about we compromise and say "I'm surprised 4,000 people in Georgia know how to Spell Charles Darwin'.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 12, 2012 10:52:39 AM PST
The Elusive Man? No Way!

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 12, 2012 11:02:01 AM PST
yes way, he has only but the best interests for HUMANITY... not corporations not ideals, but us and the survival of our species, he is the man for the job

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 12, 2012 11:05:01 AM PST
Benpachi says:
That'll do!

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 12, 2012 11:07:24 AM PST
McAwesomeo says:
Oh yes. Ars had an article about him a week or two before the election and it made me depressed. It's definitely worth reading though and here are a few excerpts.

http://arstechnica.com/staff/2012/10/editorial-meet-a-science-committee-that-doesnt-get-science/

"But Akin's (very public) misunderstanding of science pales in comparison to that of Georgia Representative Paul Broun. He's an MD who is apparently convinced most of modern science is a plot, fostered by none other than Satan. "All that stuff I was taught about evolution and embryology and the Big Bang Theory," Broun declared, "all that is lies straight from the pit of Hell.""

"In short, the committee can play a key role in setting the science and technology agenda, and help inform the entire House about key technological issues. Currently, nearly 10 percent of its members are on record as dismissing science, or being outright suspicious of the people doing it."

"And it's not like the Democrats have taken the committee very seriously either: the members' list indicates that they've left three of their allotted seats empty."

Posted on Nov 12, 2012 11:07:40 AM PST
if were going Mass Effec, I say Miranda haha

Posted on Nov 12, 2012 11:10:13 AM PST
LogJam says:
Hopefully evolution will work out so that creationists are born with the words "Don't talk to me if you don't want to waste 40 minutes of your life arguing with a complete and total taint" etched into their foreheads so we won't have to guess.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 12, 2012 11:10:17 AM PST
MrImmoli says:
"A Gallup poll from June found that 46 percent of Americans believe in creationism, or the idea that God created human beings fully formed within the last 10,000 years."

What a unnecessarily long way to write "A Gollup poll from June found that 46% of Americans are morons."

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 12, 2012 11:11:31 AM PST
I like to think all that means is that an increasingly large population of America is smart enough to avoid taking stupid polls.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 12, 2012 11:17:21 AM PST
McAwesomeo says:
"46% of Americans dumb enough to answer calls from strange numbers believe in creationism, or the idea that God created human beings full formed within the last 10,000 years. Other 54% just hung up when the realized it was someone conducting a poll."

Posted on Nov 12, 2012 1:45:19 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Nov 12, 2012 1:46:24 PM PST
Kr155 says:
Andromeda is the most distant object visible to the naked eye. It's 2.5 million light years away. so looking at it is the same as physically seeing 2.5 million years into the past. Thats a pretty strong argument for the fact that God didnt create everything less than 10,000 years ago and you don't even need special equipment, just a clear dark sky.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 12, 2012 1:45:52 PM PST
JJ4prez says:
Lol

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 12, 2012 1:47:24 PM PST
So it's like with polls that said the youth vote was gonna be down this year. The polls that determined that only called land lines and what young person has one of those?

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 12, 2012 1:51:20 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Nov 12, 2012 1:53:24 PM PST
Ice King says:
That's easy to discredit. Well, to a young Earth creationist who doesn't believe in science.

I know exactly what they'd say:

"So you're saying that this 'magical' light is 250 MILLION years old?! Ha! There weren't even people that long ago, how could there be light? Are you saying it was little green men shining flashlights at Earth all that time ago? For what reason? And where are they now? Did they just shine their flashlights then go home?"

This is what you're dealing with when you try to talk logic to creationists. Just getting past the "My grandfather wasn't no monkey!" takes considerable skill and patience.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 12, 2012 1:53:44 PM PST
JJ4prez says:
Little green men holding their flash lights? You don't have to make fun of them now.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 12, 2012 1:57:59 PM PST
Aku says:
You don't even have to go that far. Our current understanding of the sun shows that the photons released by it take a good 10,000 years to make, if not significantly longer.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 12, 2012 2:45:49 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Nov 12, 2012 2:48:15 PM PST
McAwesomeo says:
And who answers unknown numbers any more? Especially during election time. It's always going to be a robocall or a poll. Caller ID is almost standard. You have to buy dirt cheap phones in order to not have an included CID. I'm talking old-school ones that don't draw power.

My parents are the only people I know that still have a land line. Even my elderly aunt moved to a cell phone only earlier this year. But at least my parents screen unknown numbers via the answering machine. My parents' answering machine was clogged with Obama robocalls from Mark Ruffalo this election year since he was born nearby.

Edit: And yes he did say, "You may know me as the Incredible Hulk."
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Discussion in:  Video Games forum
Participants:  18
Total posts:  29
Initial post:  Nov 12, 2012
Latest post:  Nov 12, 2012

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