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Call of Duty Trains Its Sights on Microtransactions


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Showing 1-6 of 6 posts in this discussion
Initial post: Mar 13, 2013 3:54:45 AM PDT
Kin-foot says:
Call of Duty Trains Its Sights on Microtransactions

http://www.wired.com/gamelife/2013/03/call-of-duty-microtransactions/

Activision will add in-game purchases to Call of Duty: Black Ops 2 beginning Wednesday, according to the blog of Activision spokesman Dan Amrich.

The so-called "Micro Items" will include aesthetic customization options, which Activision describes as being "like dress-up for your favorite weapons." One specific example given: "The Bacon Personalization Pack," which will cover your gun in greasy, delicious bacon. These will cost two bucks a pop.

Aside from the silly aesthetic stuff like the bacon gun camo, Activision is also now selling upgrades that give players more slots for customized weapon loadouts, as well as maps and modes that were previously only available to gamers who bought the more expensive limited-edition versions of Black Ops 2.

And thus did microtransactions finally come to Call of Duty.

This was an inevitability, one long in the making. Speaking at the Game Monetization Summit in San Francisco last year, Wedbush Securities analyst Michael Pachter told an audience that Activision was screwing up by not charging players more for access to Call of Duty's multiplayer component.

"[Activision] trained gamers that you can buy a game and play it all year, ten hours a week, forever, and you never have to pay again," Pachter said. "The World of Warcraft guys are paying $180 a year, and the Call of Duty guys are paying $60. So who's got a better model?" he asked.

This is not the first attempt by Activision to apply a new payment scheme to the shooter games, which start at $60 each at retail.

In 2011 it created a service called Call of Duty Elite that added social features to the game - for a Warcraft-style monthly fee. Over 1 million fans signed up when it launched, but Activision ended up abandoning the experiment, turning Elite into a free service for all Call of Duty players. It continues to sell extra multiplayer game maps to players for substantial fees, and gives players the option of signing up for a "season pass" that gets them all the content for a discounted lump sum.

Posted on Mar 13, 2013 3:57:59 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Mar 13, 2013 4:01:26 AM PDT
MrFoxhound says:
You were ninja'd on this.

For the record, I have no problem with this. They are doing this in response to customer requests for this kind of thing. Seems stupid to not do it.

"And thus did microtransactions finally come to Call of Duty."

This guy sees all microtransactions as inherently evil, but CoD fans were asking for this stuff and Activision obliged. Plus when the microtransactions came with Dead Space 3 a lot of people, myself included, got on the hate wagon ready to burn this mother down; however, microtransactions were so benign in that game that I had no idea how to even access them until well into my NG+ (and even then only after I was told by JO MOMMA), AND you're allowed to use in game currency to buy them vs real world dollars if you so choose. And that was EA we're talking about.

Namco and Sony seem to be the worse offenders of microtransactions, go look in the PS store and see how many plane skins and character skins those two companies put out for at least $2 each.

Posted on Mar 13, 2013 4:12:28 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Mar 13, 2013 4:14:21 AM PDT
Cats Go Nyan says:
Same as Fox, I don't have a problem with it. The people that want it will buy it.

"One specific example given: "The Bacon Personalization Pack," which will cover your gun in greasy, delicious bacon. These will cost two bucks a pop."

I'd rather spend the money on real bacon.

""The World of Warcraft guys are paying $180 a year, and the Call of Duty guys are paying $60. So who's got a better model?" he asked."

WoW players to be honest. There's way more things to do on WoW than CoD, so that comparison doesn't really help his point. And he didn't mention anything of Gold membership for Xbox players, so yeah.

"In 2011 it created a service called Call of Duty Elite that added social features to the game - for a Warcraft-style monthly fee."

I'm pretty sure the "full" version of Elite was a one time fee. I had purchased it for the DLC, but it also gave you access to tools (sort of like the Combat Record from Black Ops) to improve your gameplay, all the clan crap, and a bunch of other random stuff I had no interest in.

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 13, 2013 4:27:08 AM PDT
MrFoxhound says:
Yeah, I remember Elite being an entire year of service for $50, I don't know where this guy is getting his monthly fee stuff from.

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 13, 2013 4:32:52 AM PDT
Cats Go Nyan says:
Elite was a huge pain because I mistakenly put my card # on Xbox Live to pay for it, and I had to wait until the year was up to remove it. Every time I tried to cancel it online, or even over the phone, I kept getting told that I couldn't remove my card because there was "still a currently active subscription." Even after they announced that Elite would be a free service, I still couldn't remove it.

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 13, 2013 4:36:24 AM PDT
In the War Against Microtransactions, facts are irrelevant.
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Discussion in:  Video Games forum
Participants:  4
Total posts:  6
Initial post:  Mar 13, 2013
Latest post:  Mar 13, 2013

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