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Obama calls for research between violent video games and real world violence


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Showing 1-25 of 245 posts in this discussion
Posted on Jan 23, 2013 11:42:59 AM PST
badguy says:
Why, why, why? Quit wasting money on stuff thats been done hundreds of times before and get working on real problems for f*(&s sake.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 22, 2013 6:57:05 PM PST
[Deleted by Amazon on Jan 22, 2013 7:26:36 PM PST]

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 22, 2013 6:55:29 PM PST
You know, if a parent who is against video games is also against those things, I can't find fault with their position.

Posted on Jan 22, 2013 6:51:04 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Jan 22, 2013 6:51:40 PM PST
FryBaby says:
Obama finally getting to the root of the problem...let's get rid of these aggravating gamers getting in the way of hard working folkes just wanting to relax and watch a few hours of bang bang shoot em ups

Posted on Jan 17, 2013 10:44:01 AM PST
Lego games encourage rampant vandalism. Ban 'em!

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 17, 2013 10:39:25 AM PST
Well reasonable people will look at the study and take what lessons they can. Will competant adults that have no tendency towards violence stop playing the games they love? Probably not. Will it change what games they might allow their kids to play and at what age they are allowed access to certain types of games? Probably.

Posted on Jan 17, 2013 10:36:43 AM PST
When and if this scientific study comes back with results that video games do indeed result or aid in violent behavior, will the VGF believe that as fact?
I say probably not.
Will that cause you to stop or alter the games you play?
I say probably not.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 17, 2013 10:27:39 AM PST
Soulshine says:
My nephew's violence is inspired by some lego ninja cartoon and wanting to be like Spiderman or Ironman. But it's mostly my fault for letting him practice punching and kicking me because it's funny.

Posted on Jan 17, 2013 10:24:50 AM PST
[Deleted by Amazon on Jan 17, 2013 11:23:30 AM PST]

Posted on Jan 17, 2013 10:22:22 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Jan 17, 2013 10:22:54 AM PST
One thing I've wondered is that if people fear that game violence can lead to actual violence wouldn't you be much more worried about the people who play laser tag and paint ball?

EDIT: And not to even bring up sport hunting. The activity that actually involves killing.

Posted on Jan 17, 2013 10:08:44 AM PST
GAR says:
I found this article on the web:

Violent video games and child aggression
Survey finds 75 percent of parents think violent video games contribute to actual violence.

Little more than two months have passed since the shootings at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Connecticut and the world still grieves for the 26 lives lost.
As the community of Newtown and the nation struggle to make sense of the devastation, gun control, mental health issues and violent video games have all been called into question. Groups like Sandy Hook Promise call for a `national conversation' and President Obama is rolling out plans to curb gun violence, but the search for solutions on how to avoid a repeat incident remains.

In the days following the shooting, details unfolded surrounding Adam Lanza, the 20-year-old Newtown shooter, his "strange" behavior and "obsession" with violent video games kept surfacing. Lanza lived at his mother's colonial-style mansion, where he had two of the house's four bedrooms - one for himself and the other for the computer where he played violent video games, reports the The Telegraph.

According to express.co.uk, Lanza's favorite video game was said to be a shockingly violent fantasy war game called Dynasty Warriors. Was it a game or easy access to a deadly arsenal of guns - he reportedly learned how to shoot after his mother took him to local ranges - that inspired Lanza to carry out the deadly massacre?
The topic of virtual violence resulting in real life aggression has long been controversial. Are these games simply a fun hobby, or for children who may already be mentally or emotionally unstable, do these games have the ability to push someone over the edge?

A new survey from Common Sense Media found that 75 percent of parents think violent video games contribute to actual violence. 1,050 people were surveyed, and 89 percent of them say violence in video games is a problem. (45 percent say it's a major problem; 44 percent say it's a minor problem.)

"There is a real harm in children having exposure to violence, such as playing violent video games," says Licensed Clinical Psychologist, Debra Kissen, Ph.D., M.H.S.A. of Chicago, IL. "By playing violent video games, children (and adults) become desensitized to this content and therefore experience less of an emotional reaction to violence," says Kissen. "Therefore, violent behavior becomes normalized and becomes a more reasonable alternative when experiencing a conflict."

Jason Schreier, Editor of Kotaku, the Gamer's Guide challenges the Common Sense Media survey findings and the association between violent video game use and violence.
"There have been no scientific studies that connect violent video games to violence," he wrote on the site. "There have been studies that connect violent video games to aggression (more on that in the near future), but there is absolutely zero evidence, according to leading researchers in this field, that links violent video games to violent crime in any way."

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 17, 2013 9:27:05 AM PST
A censorship organization run by corporations. Things like this just piss me off.

Definitely give Robert Redford respect for doing what he does and representing Independent films including opening up independent film movie theaters. He gives a big F U to the MPAA.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 17, 2013 9:14:09 AM PST
Realizing that the MPAA is pretty much a censorship organization is never a good feeling.

In the words of Fidget from Cecil B. Demented "Hey hey MPAA, how many movies did you censor today?"
http://youtu.be/OJPVdgngKjA

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 17, 2013 8:47:02 AM PST
I watched it last night.

Great documentary but damn did it piss me off.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 17, 2013 7:10:43 AM PST
No, Mog... People in Ira Glass' house shouldn't throw stones.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 17, 2013 7:08:17 AM PST
We should break into Ira Glass's gold plated fortress of solitude and take the money back.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 17, 2013 7:06:36 AM PST
NPR IS THE ONE PERCENT!!

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 17, 2013 7:04:32 AM PST
The other 1% goes to NPR.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 17, 2013 6:55:59 AM PST
No, when you are talking about trillions of dollars, it doesn't. This is the problem with the cynical budget debate in this country. Real solutions hurt. They involve pain to seniors, big military drawdowns, and raising taxes on pretty much everyone. It is the craven nature of the debate that allows people to think that this issue can be solved by nibbling around the irrevelant edges and only inflicting pain on *other* people. Preferably people who lack any political power to be heard about the impact on them.

In any event, the CDC is a valid federal enterprise, gun violence is a nationwide problem, and ten million is precious little buck for the probability of some bang.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 17, 2013 6:35:53 AM PST
Soulshine says:
"With donations from viewers like YOU! Mua-ha-ha-ha!"

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 17, 2013 6:30:43 AM PST
Soulshine says:
Clearly 1 is the best. I don't think anyone ever says it isn't. I also agree that 3 is second and Samuel Jackson was great in that one.

I should really watch 4 again. I only saw that once and I just wasn't crazy about it. Maybe I didn't give it a fair shot. I'd still have to put it firmly in last place for now.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 17, 2013 6:24:33 AM PST
What? No, I neeeeeeeeeever use sarcasm. As a jew it's just not in my nature.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 17, 2013 6:19:06 AM PST
Lucanus says:
My sarcasm radar is going off, am I correct? :)

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 17, 2013 6:16:34 AM PST
Nope, 99% of our debt is caused by the money we give to the Corporation for Public Broadcasting.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 17, 2013 6:15:14 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Jan 17, 2013 6:18:45 AM PST
Lucanus says:
I have to disagree completely. 10 million here and 10 million there didn't create the 16 trillion dollar debt. The 8 trillion on the cold war, 1 trillion in Vietnam and 4 trillion on Iraq/Pak/Afghan did. In total those silly/worthless wars costs us 13 trillion, or 81% of our total debt. War is expensive, and our recent wars have been pointless. I am also being generous with the cold war, some experts claim the real numbers are closer to 16 trillion. I went with 8 which is on the low end of current estimations. War is why we currently are in debt up to our eye balls, not scientific funding. :)

Oh and taking the top 1% tax rate from 91% to 35% didn't exactly help either. Capital gains were 35% and were as low as 15% for quite some time. I am not suggesting we go back to those crazy high tax rates, but merely pointing out we also greatly reduced our revenue to benefit the top 1% over the last 30 years.
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This discussion

Discussion in:  Video Games forum
Participants:  49
Total posts:  245
Initial post:  Jan 16, 2013
Latest post:  Jan 23, 2013

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