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OT: Sen. Daniel Inouye of Hawaii dies....


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Initial post: Dec 17, 2012 3:12:01 PM PST
Eggman, PhD says:
Hawaii Sen. Daniel K. Inouye, the Senate's most senior Democrat, died Monday from respiratory complications. He was 88.

Inouye was a World War II veteran, a Medal of Honor recipient and Hawaii's senior senator. He was hospitalized at the Walter Reed National Military Medical Center at the time of his death.

His wife, Irene Hirano Inouye, and his son, Daniel Ken Inouye Jr., were at his side. Last rites were performed by Senate Chaplain Dr. Barry Black.

Very sad. This guy was a hero.

Posted on Dec 17, 2012 3:31:40 PM PST
Rev. Otter says:
:(

Posted on Dec 17, 2012 3:37:19 PM PST
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Posted on Dec 17, 2012 3:39:14 PM PST
SuperHiro says:
Yea... cuz running for congress invalidates that whole medal of honor thing right? C'mon.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 17, 2012 3:42:24 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Dec 17, 2012 3:53:30 PM PST
No, it just makes him complicated, rather than purely heroic.

Like an antihero, say.

I mean, if I save a bunch of orphans from a burning building and subsequently kill the pope in a drunken golf cart accident, that doesn't un-save those orphans but the pope is still dead.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 17, 2012 3:49:53 PM PST
Joel H. says:
Hey dv whats your GT? SHARE WITH US!!

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 17, 2012 4:20:13 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Dec 17, 2012 4:25:03 PM PST
As an Asian America who petitioned to be able to fight in the war for the US, shot and hit with an RPG I don't think you could ever not call him a hero. We lost an amazing man today.

Posted on Dec 17, 2012 4:23:01 PM PST
R. Typo says:
It's scary to think that there are people in their 80s deciding laws for the rest of us.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 17, 2012 4:30:38 PM PST
Dukeshire says:
Well, the people elected him over and over. It is not like he was appointed. Also, it was not like Strom Thurmond a racist from North Carolina who served until he was over 100 before he died a decade ago. Then after his death, his black child came out of the woodwork....Awesome stuff. The family to their credit acknowledged and embraced her.

At least Mr. Inouye made a positive contribution on society unlike Thurmond.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 17, 2012 4:51:04 PM PST
I'm sorry, but this is easily the most insane analogies that I've ever seen you give. I mean, this is a McClane level though. Hero might be to strong of a term, but he was most def a patriot. He enlisted into a military that doubtlessly didn't care for him at the time because of his ethnicity to protect his countryment. In what way is his trying to improve the country from within even close to an equivilant to killing the pope?

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 17, 2012 5:03:47 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Dec 17, 2012 5:04:03 PM PST
I'm not trying to downplay anything this guy, or anybody else, might have done; I just really don't understand what it is about "receiving/living through a serious injury" that supposedly makes people more heroic.

If you get the injury defending somebody else, or doing something heroic, sure, it's a heroic sacrifice; but I've never considered "being injured" a heroic act, whether or not you happen to be injured in the line of duty--even if the duty in question is a heroic one.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 17, 2012 5:12:35 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Dec 17, 2012 5:15:38 PM PST
I'm assuming you are just completely ignorant of this man so I'll let this pass. However I'll post just a section from wikipedia, the absolutely easiest source you could have gone to before talking your dumb ignorant nonsense and the bare minimum one could do to look something up before shooting their mouth off.

--
In 1943, when the U.S. Army dropped its ban on Japanese-Americans, Inouye curtailed his premedical studies at the University of Hawaii and enlisted in the Army.[5] He volunteered to be part of the all-Nisei 442nd Regimental Combat Team.[6] This army unit was mostly made up of second-generation Japanese Americans from Hawaii and the mainland.[7]

Inouye was promoted to the rank of sergeant within his first year, and he was given the role of platoon leader. He served in Italy in 1944 during the Rome-Arno Campaign before his regiment was transferred to the Vosges Mountains region of France, where he spent two weeks in the battle to relieve the Lost Battalion, a battalion of the 141st Infantry Regiment that was surrounded by German forces. He was promoted to the rank of second lieutenant for his actions there. At one point while he was leading an attack, a shot struck him in the chest directly above his heart, but the bullet was stopped by the two silver dollars he happened to have stacked in his shirt pocket.[8] He continued to carry the coins throughout the war in his shirt pocket as good luck charms until he lost them shortly before the battle in which he lost his arm.[9]


Inouye as a Lieutenant in the U.S. ArmyOn April 21, 1945, Inouye was grievously wounded while leading an assault on a heavily-defended ridge near San Terenzo in Tuscany, Italy called Colle Musatello. The ridge served as a strongpoint along the strip of German fortifications known as the Gothic Line, which represented the last and most dogged line of German defensive works in Italy. As he led his platoon in a flanking maneuver, three German machine guns opened fire from covered positions just 40 yards away, pinning his men to the ground. Inouye stood up to attack and was shot in the stomach; ignoring his wound, he proceeded to attack and destroy the first machine gun nest with hand grenades and fire from his Thompson submachine gun. After being informed of the severity of his wound by his platoon sergeant, he refused treatment and rallied his men for an attack on the second machine gun position, which he also successfully destroyed before collapsing from blood loss.

As his squad distracted the third machine gunner, Inouye crawled toward the final bunker, eventually drawing within 10 yards. As he raised himself up and cocked his arm to throw his last grenade into the fighting position, a German inside fired a rifle grenade that struck him on the right elbow, severing most of his arm and leaving his own primed grenade reflexively "clenched in a fist that suddenly didn't belong to me anymore".[10] Inouye's horrified soldiers moved to his aid, but he shouted for them to keep back out of fear his severed fist would involuntarily relax and drop the grenade. As the German inside the bunker reloaded his rifle, Inouye pried the live grenade from his useless right hand and transferred it to his left. As the German aimed his rifle to finish him off, Inouye tossed the grenade off-hand into the bunker and destroyed it. He stumbled to his feet and continued forward, silencing the last German resistance with a one-handed burst from his Thompson before being wounded in the leg and tumbling unconscious to the bottom of the ridge. When he awoke to see the concerned men of his platoon hovering over him, his only comment before being carried away was to gruffly order them to return to their positions, since, as he pointed out, "nobody called off the war!"[11]

The remainder of Inouye's mutilated right arm was later amputated at a field hospital without proper anesthesia, as he had been given too much morphine at an aid station and it was feared any more would lower his blood pressure enough to kill him.[12]

Although Inouye had lost his right arm, he remained in the military until 1947 and was honorably discharged with the rank of captain. At the time of his leaving of the Army, he was a recipient of the Bronze Star Medal and the Purple Heart. Inouye was initially awarded the Distinguished Service Cross for his bravery in this action, with the award later being upgraded to the Medal of Honor by President Bill Clinton (alongside 19 other Nisei servicemen who served in the 442nd Regimental Combat Team and were believed to have been denied proper recognition of their bravery due to their race).[13] His story, along with interviews with him about the war as a whole, were featured prominently in the 2007 Ken Burns documentary The War.[14]
--------

The man was a hero by any definition, show some respect. That goes double for you DVvM

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 17, 2012 5:17:50 PM PST
He was a hero, but also a politician.

I admire heroes, but detest politicians. So my take on Inouye is mixed.

So I will just settle on "it's unfortunate that he is dead, for those who knew him and cared for him."

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 17, 2012 5:21:28 PM PST
Is there something in particular about his political career you dislike? The fact of the matter is we DO have a government and people are going to be part of that. If you are going to hate on people just for being part of it and not for their actions as a politician than please don't weigh in on the subject.

Posted on Dec 17, 2012 5:26:20 PM PST
<<As his squad distracted the third machine gunner, Inouye crawled toward the final bunker, eventually drawing within 10 yards. As he raised himself up and cocked his arm to throw his last grenade into the fighting position, a German inside fired a rifle grenade that struck him on the right elbow, severing most of his arm and leaving his own primed grenade reflexively "clenched in a fist that suddenly didn't belong to me anymore".[10] Inouye's horrified soldiers moved to his aid, but he shouted for them to keep back out of fear his severed fist would involuntarily relax and drop the grenade. As the German inside the bunker reloaded his rifle, Inouye pried the live grenade from his useless right hand and transferred it to his left. As the German aimed his rifle to finish him off, Inouye tossed the grenade off-hand into the bunker and destroyed it. He stumbled to his feet and continued forward, silencing the last German resistance with a one-handed burst from his Thompson before being wounded in the leg and tumbling unconscious to the bottom of the ridge.>>

Wow, that's pretty badass.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 17, 2012 5:27:17 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Dec 17, 2012 5:28:15 PM PST
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In reply to an earlier post on Dec 17, 2012 5:30:02 PM PST
Way to talk out your ass, Mogs. I specifically said I meant no disrespect to anybody, and I wasn't referring to your hero. I merely responded to your description of him as a hero because, and I quote, he "petitioned to be able to fight in the war for the US, [and was] shot and hit with an RPG."

Your initial description of his heroism--half of which was that he happened to be injured--did not strike me as especially heroic. As I previously mentioned, being injured has never struck me as being heroic in anybody, be the person who was injured a hero or no. I'm sorry if that for some reason offends you, but, even if it does, your reaction is completely baseless; and because of it, I'm entirely disinclined to care about anything this guy might have done that could actually have been heroic.

Posted on Dec 17, 2012 5:36:27 PM PST
After seeing all the horrors that happened this weekend, its good to know that true heroes still exist.

Posted on Dec 17, 2012 6:09:36 PM PST
Dukeshire says:
This thread is befuddling the hell out of me and I am easily befuddled. We have one person arguing that no politician can be a hero, or something along that vein, which is asinine. If he supports his state and does good by it then there's nothing wrong with being a career politician. That was his calling. His actions in WWII attest to his great contributions to the US.

If I made a post that I liked apple pie, people would piss and moan that they don't like it. The thread would turn into middle school nonsense of who has the biggest brain and computer...er, I mean genitalia. Jesus, just acknowledge that the guy was pretty quality and let it go at that instead of trying to get all existential while making a donkey of yourself(selves) in the process.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 17, 2012 6:56:24 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Dec 17, 2012 6:57:00 PM PST
Eggman, PhD says:
"If I made a post that I liked apple pie, people would piss and moan that they don't like it."

Such is life on the interwebs.

People love to argue, and they love it even more when they can do it anonymously.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 17, 2012 7:11:08 PM PST
Dukeshire says:
I like to argue and make an ass of myself as much as the next person. But damn....This one was a straightforward post like the Obama crying one and yet the feces hit the fan.....It is all in good fun. Usually.

Posted on Dec 18, 2012 9:25:03 AM PST
R. Typo says:
The self-righteousness is strong in this thread.

Posted on Dec 18, 2012 9:34:52 AM PST
uncledonnie3 says:
After reading about this guy's exploits I don't understand how anyone could say he was anything but a hero.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 18, 2012 10:11:09 AM PST
Voice of god says:
"I mean, if I save a bunch of orphans from a burning building and subsequently kill the pope in a drunken golf cart accident, that doesn't un-save those orphans but the pope is still dead."

I don't understand your analogy. You saved orphans and killed a tremendously powerful hate-filled dickwad. That's a win-win.

Posted on Dec 18, 2012 10:22:44 AM PST
dwood78 says:
I'm aware of who he was Sen. Daniel Inouye. I remember watching "Ken Burns The War" some time ago. He was interviewed for the multi-part doc. He talked about getting hurt in battle & needing blood transfusion. At that time the Red Cross separated blood by race as well as blood type, but they had none from a Japanese donor, so they gave him blood taken from a Black donor. Inouye smiled when mentioning that during the interview. A real hero, & a nice guy too. Although I may not always agree with his politics, I gotten say thank you for your service in WWII.
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Discussion in:  Video Games forum
Participants:  16
Total posts:  30
Initial post:  Dec 17, 2012
Latest post:  Dec 18, 2012

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