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Kotaku - Building a gaming PC for under $700


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Showing 76-100 of 120 posts in this discussion
Posted on Feb 12, 2013 12:12:49 PM PST
Honestly I'm thinking of trying a build on my own this time around. I was looking at some pre-builts as I tend to suck at building my own (had a horrible time just replacing the PSU in my current PC).

But the PC's I'm looking at pre-built are coming to around $1200, when I know I could save myself easily $400 and get better parts if I did it myself. Not to mention I have a 550Ti and a brand new 650 watt Corsair PSU in the machine I have. Not to mention the hard drive I currently have would be silly to replace a 1 Tb HDD with a 500 Gb one.

My biggest thing is more just being worried about trying to do it. Replacing a video card was super simple, but some of the stuff past that has me really worried it might be over my head a bit. I absolutely SUCK at hardware stuff.

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 12, 2013 12:12:56 PM PST
I think it's a "class" of cards.

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 12, 2013 12:16:11 PM PST
JJ4prez says:
Building a PC is cake, if jt can do it, you can do it. lol

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 12, 2013 12:16:41 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Feb 12, 2013 12:18:32 PM PST
John Galt says:
That is one point the article makes- references. There are a ton of references out there. I can't remember who I was watching on youtube, but he was very good at going over the steps needed and what to look out for. If you just watch a few of these videos, it really calms your uncertainty and doubt- not all of it, but most of it.

What I worried most about was buying a defected part.

edit-

Posted on Feb 12, 2013 12:19:06 PM PST
DVvM says:
How much would I have to spend to buy a PC that can play your $5-$20 low requirement steam games (like FTL or Torchlight 2, that sort of thing), and would be able to do so at min-settings for at least 7 years?

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 12, 2013 12:19:25 PM PST
$400 PS4 will also have games that the PC cant touch.

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 12, 2013 12:21:54 PM PST
I agree that if you're running a gaming PC on a 60Hz TV, that anything more than a $500 system is overkill.

But on a 120Hz monitor...a $550 680 Ti absolutely dominates on visuals over a $150 660Ti. Whereas, the difference between a $150 660Ti and a PS3....not as much.

I'm thinking this may be the type of thing where seeing is believing.

Posted on Feb 12, 2013 12:28:06 PM PST
Soulshine says:
I don't care about the parts so much, I just don't want to do the labor or troubleshooting.

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 12, 2013 12:31:51 PM PST
John Galt says:
Isn't the 660ti far superior to the PS3 gpu?

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 12, 2013 12:32:48 PM PST
John Galt says:
Are you comparing a low end gaming computer to the life of a console?

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 12, 2013 12:37:16 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Feb 12, 2013 12:51:56 PM PST
got mayo?™ says:
If you are running a 120Hz monitor, you want to be synched to that.

Needless to say a $200card cant do what $500 card can do multimonitor, 27" 2560 x 1400 displays etc either...

I agree the law of diminishing returns exists, i just see it starting a bit higher than $200....seeing the focus is enthusiast level performance.

I think that new segment is in the $250-$300 range, witnessed by the 6950-70/GTX 560Ti....seems developers chose that range to optimize the most for some reason in recent memory.
I suppose its their sweet spot between enthusiast and mass market, and hardware potency.

Steams hardware pools seem to suggest this to be the case as well.

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 12, 2013 12:39:34 PM PST
DVvM says:
No, I want a low end PC, if I can put one together for really cheap.

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 12, 2013 12:39:42 PM PST
See the replacement PSU thing had me worried. Of course I was dumb and didnt look into it much. I assumed it would be just unplug and replug everything in where it went. Unfortunately the new PSU had about 9 extra power outlets and switched some things over a bit. I ended up taking it into a computer repair shop and found out I hadnt seated the CPU thing all the way (I got worried pushing too hard would break something) and I had something else plugged in backwards. So while I was REALLY close, it was still far enough to make me hesitant towards doing it again...

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 12, 2013 12:50:32 PM PST
"I suppose its their sweet spot between enthusiast and mass market, and hardware potency."

I definitely agree with that.

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 12, 2013 1:21:01 PM PST
John Galt says:
I just know enough about computer to get by. I do like the AMD A10-5800K from what I am reading. I would just use the integrated graphics and 8 gb (1866Mhz) ram. Buying the parts on Amazon is around $430.00- is that cheap enough?

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 12, 2013 1:24:45 PM PST
John Galt says:
No kidding, it is suprising how much force is needed to install the cpu. Peace of mind goes a long way. It might be better to just pay $200/$300 more for a computer and have a warranty- adding a new graphics card down the road is easier to do.

Posted on Feb 12, 2013 1:35:21 PM PST
Keller says:
What is the general thought of AMD vs Intel as this point in time? I know for a while there AMD was the chipset to have. Is that still true?

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 12, 2013 1:38:56 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Feb 12, 2013 1:39:34 PM PST
got mayo?™ says:
I would suggest a better upgrade path. As a package its good, but its really only a 'great' 720p performer.

$280 Way better investment in the big 3, and allows you CPU upgrades, up to 32GB memory and whatever GPU you could ever want. This will run 1080p High setting for most games.

Sapphire Radeon HD 7770 GHZ 1 GB DDR5 HDMI/DVI-I/DP PCI-Express Graphics Card 11201-17-20G
AMD Phenom II X4 965 AM3 3.4Ghz 512KB 45NM 125W 4000MHZ
Gigabyte GA-970A-DS3 AM3+ AMD 970 SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 ATX AMD Motherboard

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 12, 2013 1:56:28 PM PST
Lyrick_ says:
Sub $200 there is little difference between Intel and AMD CPUs in gaming performance at similar price points.

Paying more than $200 for a gaming CPU enters into the diminishing returns rather quickly, or rather immediately.

@John Galt

The new Geforce Titan Card is an upcoming dual GPU card based off the K20 and K20x Engineering Cards chipset (GK110) that were utilized in the Titan Super Computer in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

They are Kepler based cards (28nm fabrications) that are supposed to outperform the current GTX690 (dual GPU 680/GK104 chip).

Posted on Feb 12, 2013 2:01:05 PM PST
Keller says:
Thanks Lyrick. I am piecing together my next build. I am looking at the 660 TI GPU as well.

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 12, 2013 2:24:37 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Feb 12, 2013 2:30:35 PM PST
John Galt says:
My combo for the three is $183.78- and there isn't much for upgrading outside of adding an HD 6670 crossfire
edit- I added the ram cost by mistake- A10 covers chip/gpu

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 12, 2013 2:33:23 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Feb 12, 2013 2:37:57 PM PST
got mayo?™ says:
I would look into that Hybrid crossfire more. I remember with Llano A series that driver support for it from games was hit and miss with it, and the Hybrid Xfire wasn't much of an upgrade as it is in a standard crossfire in a traditional system.

I too considered such setup. Its cheap, and tempting. Ultimately it turns into a great multimedia PC that is rather limited as a gaming oriented PC down the road. Its 2013 and 4K is around the corner, you really want a solid 1080p machine today that can take you 4 years and be ale to upgrade significantly (ie GPU, CPU if needed)

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 12, 2013 2:40:13 PM PST
John Galt says:
I'm sure you are right about issues with crossfire.

I guess it all depends on the level of quality of experience. I played Crisis with a i5-3570k (HD4000, I believe) with no descrete gpu. Sure the graphics were on the lowest settings and it was no even 720p; but it worked without any problems.

Posted on Feb 12, 2013 2:46:49 PM PST
John Galt says:
I guess what I am saying is that I am still tempted with this build as a starter gamer pc. 2 or 3 years later, I would end up paying 2 or 3 times more on a computer, but at least by then I know for sure this is what I want. It would only cost me up to $400-$450 upfront. Paying $700 upfront is a harder pill to swallow if you are uncertain about pc gaming.

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 12, 2013 2:47:39 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Feb 12, 2013 2:50:29 PM PST
got mayo?™ says:
If you are basing it on Intel Integrated graphics experience, you will certainly get better gaming results from an A10.

I just don't see say ...for example...12 fps in Crysis with HD4000 vs 23 fps with an A10 as something i'd want to build for, with no upside beyond that.

Consoles do better without the hassle there. That said my nephew played MW3 for a well over a year on an A8 Laptop...so there are games that hardware runs well at decent settings, but as the new gen transitions i'd imagine games being much more demanding for lower end hardware like that. Now if you were running a Phenom Quad with a 6670, at least you'd have the benefit of moving up the GPU ladder when the 6670 doesn't cut it anymore. Sky is the limit for your upgrade path.
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Discussion in:  Video Games forum
Participants:  22
Total posts:  120
Initial post:  Feb 12, 2013
Latest post:  Feb 13, 2013

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