Customer Discussions > Video Games forum

Dad hacks Windwaker for his daughter


Sort: Oldest first | Newest first
Showing 1-25 of 78 posts in this discussion
In reply to an earlier post on Nov 14, 2012 11:32:30 PM PST
Because that would make Link a lesbian. It's very clear from the first Zelda game chronologically, ie Skyward Sword, that Link is crushing on Zelda.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 14, 2012 9:48:01 PM PST
I agree with you 100% DV. Great post.

Posted on Nov 14, 2012 9:18:19 PM PST
Beyond Good and Evil did a good job of having a female protagonist who was strong and capable.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 14, 2012 5:30:47 PM PST
Society hasn't met the likes of octo-daughter, who can perform four or more tasks simultaneously with only a 57% incidence of cephalopod madness (and even amongst those cases, only 35% involved fatal tentacle stranglings).

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 14, 2012 4:40:44 PM PST
DVvM says:
Modding your children is generally frowned upon by society.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 14, 2012 3:51:27 PM PST
Well, what if I wanted to employ my own form of hacking and mod my son so he's now a daughter? Then he could emphathize with Samus more and get the most out of metroid. Would that make me a more attentive father?

I'm joking, BTW. I was just getting nostalgic for our old ME3 ending arguments :)

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 14, 2012 2:07:10 PM PST
DVvM says:
If you wanted your small male child to experience Metroid as a self-empowerment fantasy, by all means hack the game and change Samus's gender.

But, since there are absolutely no shortage of good games with a male protagonist, it makes more sense to just choose a different game for that purpose and save Metroid for the "you see, women can be heroes too" lesson for which there are comparatively few good examples.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 14, 2012 1:49:07 PM PST
You were also wrong, so yeah.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 14, 2012 1:48:48 PM PST
I'm a 3DO fan, so I have no problem with FMV games! I loved The Lost Files of Sherlock Holmes game on 3DO, speaking of. Probably hasn't aged well either but I still enjoy it.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 14, 2012 1:48:15 PM PST
MrImmoli says:
I don't think they give a reason. I said that "I'm not having my daughter growing up thinking girls don't get to be the hero and rescue their little brothers." is crap because a game having a male main character isn't saying women are incompetent. Then proceeded to call Metroid as sexist series and how I'm going to mod it so that the main character is a male and young men don't grow up thinking men don't get to be the hero.

And it was deleted.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 14, 2012 1:41:21 PM PST
I think they'll all on GoG now for dirt cheap. "The Beast Within" is a full FMV game so it hasn't held up well, but it's still cool.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 14, 2012 1:40:34 PM PST
Why was your post deleted?

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 14, 2012 1:39:47 PM PST
MrImmoli says:
Prepare to have your post deleted from Amazon, I made the same point and that's what happened to me.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 14, 2012 1:24:26 PM PST
That's like Hacking a Metroid game to make Samus a guy. You don't do that!

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 14, 2012 1:21:27 PM PST
Perhaps, but who would play it? I tried Rumble Roses... The overt sexuality was the only selling point, cause it was a crap game otherwise...

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 14, 2012 12:16:44 PM PST
I've never played any of the Gabriel Knight games, unfortunately. I should get on that.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 14, 2012 12:14:13 PM PST
Right, but there's a way of doing a Women's Wrestling Federation without being sleazy. too.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 14, 2012 12:05:57 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Nov 14, 2012 12:10:38 PM PST
Gabriel Knight is written by a female as well: Jane Jensen. Her "Sins of the Father" is still, in my opinion, the best written adventure game ever made (sorry Tim). I still remember the chapter one poem: "I dreamt of blood upon the shore, of eyes that spoke of sin/The lake was smooth and deep and black, as was her scented skin." Lotsa voodoo, mon. Good stuff.

Edit (I'm doing a lot of these today): Jensen has a kickstarter project. It's closed for donations, but keep an eye on it if you like supernatural thrillers that don't feature sparkling vampires.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 14, 2012 12:02:30 PM PST
Ah, yeah, the mainstream argument is really good, actually. There is for sure a place for all of that material in the market place, just take a look a Japan's love for the adult visual novel, but I do think the hypersexualization of games IS expected though and I think it's going to continue down that route for a little while here. It's such a male dominated market, for better or worse, than people keep trying to push the envelope into that direction. The Conan stuff was very fitting for the world of it all, with the teenage male fantasies that were Howard's old stories (or what I understand them to be. I've never actually read them...) but I think there's going to be some interesting roads ahead.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 14, 2012 11:58:37 AM PST
Rumble Roses is a game about a women's wrestling federation... If you went in with expectations of something tastefully done, you never saw GLOW on Saturday mornings... A game based on something like that is built to objectify women... Would you expect Leisure Suit Larry to be classy?

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 14, 2012 11:56:38 AM PST
Don't forget that King's Quest was written by a woman either. I think what helped the adventure games is the lack of machismo in the play-style. There IS Leisure Suit Larry, but he's shown as such a loser that the sleaze comes across as fitting and dare I say LOVEABLE, unlike, say, Magna Cum Laude, which was just late night Cinemax scum. Regardless, playing an adventure game is like you say, with the genders not even really mattering. Kinda neat, I wouldn't have thought of that myself.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 14, 2012 11:55:02 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Nov 14, 2012 11:56:16 AM PST
DVvM says:
I think that pornography definitely has its place in the marketplace. It's just that in films and literature the truly prurient works tend not to be anywhere close to the mainstream. Mainstream cinema, television, and literature tend to be more inclusive, not just in terms of gender, but in terms of race and sexuality and that sort of thing. That's not to say that movies and TV are necessarily good with issues of race, gender, and sexuality, but they're a hell of a lot better than video games.

So there's no problem with a game in which topless women demand to be crushed by your love, it's just problematic when those games are considered normal, expected, mainstream, etc.

If you're making a video game for a wide audience, you should be aware that some of the people who play your game will fail to be white/japanese, male, and straight in every conceivable way to fail that three-prong test.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 14, 2012 11:51:34 AM PST
How is being intentionally extreme make it less culpable though? Have you played anything like Rumble Roses? That game is so overly sexual that I actually feel uncomfortable while playing it. It's one step away from being blatant pornography. How is that better than Tomb Raider one?

Posted on Nov 14, 2012 11:49:59 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Nov 14, 2012 11:54:19 AM PST
I remember really enjoying playing the character Grace Nakimura in the Gabriel Knight series. She's a very well-written character and definitely comes off as the "useful one" when compared with Gabriel who just stumbles into solutions. I think early adventure games were really good about gender equality and it wasn't until gaming became a children's hobby during the NES era that women were marginalized.

Good female characters I remember from "ye old days": Rosetta & Valanice (King's Quest), Laverne (Day of the Tentacle), Maureen (unfortuantly unplayable, but unquestionably badass in Full Throttle), April (The Longest Journey and Dreamfall), Laura Bow (my second favorite adventure game heroine from The Colonel's Bequest and The Dagger of Amen Ra). There are more, but all of the female leads I mentioned are capable and strong without being warrior princesses in chainmail bikinis.

All those games were also made by Americans...and maybe a few Frenchmen :)

*Edit: I just realized most of those characters are from post-NES era, so I guess I shouldn't blame the kiddies. Maybe the arrival of legitimately good writers on the adventure game scene is what made it happen.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 14, 2012 11:49:31 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Nov 14, 2012 11:50:57 AM PST
DVvM says:
Lollipop Chainsaw is actually fairly interesting, since in part it is a critique against objectification, as our protagonist thoroughly objectifies her boyfriend, who is now a severed head that begs for death that Ms. Starling refuses to grant him because she likes having him around.

It probably doesn't send the "objectification is bad" message as well as it could, though. It's sort of like the movie "Sucker Punch" in that way.
‹ Previous 1 2 3 4 Next ›
[Add comment]
Add your own message to the discussion
To insert a product link use the format: [[ASIN:ASIN product-title]] (What's this?)
Prompts for sign-in
 


 

This discussion

Discussion in:  Video Games forum
Participants:  28
Total posts:  78
Initial post:  Nov 8, 2012
Latest post:  Nov 14, 2012

New! Receive e-mail when new posts are made.

Search Customer Discussions