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Rock Band is the best example of games as an art form


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Initial post: Dec 3, 2012 8:49:24 AM PST
It's long so I'll just post a snip:

http://penny-arcade.com/report/editorial-article/games-are-art-rock-band-and-its-history-prove-it/all

<snip>

This is why Rock Band is the best example of games as an art form. The game leverages every strength of the medium in order to share a very specific feeling, and the final product re-creates that emotion with great skill. When people bring up games as art they often talk about games that look like art, as if recreating a certain aesthetic is enough to be effective. Other people point to a game's writing, which may be done artfully, but it still doesn't make the game itself art.

Posted on Dec 3, 2012 8:50:58 AM PST
I will frame my rockband case and hang it on my wall! Finally! I can prove this to my wife when she gets home

Posted on Dec 3, 2012 8:51:07 AM PST
Oskar2525 says:
What is art? Are we art? Is art, art?

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 3, 2012 8:55:06 AM PST
DVvM says:
Art is anything that any two people, anywhere, believe is art (though not necessarily simultaneously.)

Posted on Dec 3, 2012 8:55:10 AM PST
Soulshine says:
click-click-click-click, click-click-click--click. click-click-click-click____click-click-click-click_click_click.

Posted on Dec 3, 2012 8:56:10 AM PST
I can agree with this, music is about the only "art" I can really get behind.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 3, 2012 8:56:44 AM PST
I still have trouble seeing those single-color canvasses as art.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 3, 2012 8:57:51 AM PST
DVvM says:
Well, you don't have to think they're art, but if two other people think they're art, they let you in the art club.

It's not very hard to get in the art club, so it doesn't mean much.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 3, 2012 8:59:13 AM PST
Kirksplosion says:
I'm going to read this article so hard.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 3, 2012 9:00:20 AM PST
GUEST!! says:
"What is art?"

Baby don't hurt me.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 3, 2012 9:10:19 AM PST
JWK says:
What about the squiggly lines? Don't forget the squiggly line art. That stuff really makes you think, "Why the #$%^ am I looking at this, again?"

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 3, 2012 9:10:45 AM PST
JWK says:
lol

Posted on Dec 3, 2012 9:12:11 AM PST
waxc3 says:
im thinking i wont agree with anything the author wrote.

Posted on Dec 3, 2012 9:13:16 AM PST
PacinoBully says:
This game is art because music is art. Is karaokee a form of art now too?

There are hundreds of games that are a better example of video games as art than this.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 3, 2012 9:16:39 AM PST
Wow....is this a Saved By The Bell reference!?!?!??!!??!

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 3, 2012 9:18:31 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Dec 3, 2012 9:21:35 AM PST
Kirksplosion says:
"This game is art because music is art."

Didn't read the article, eh? Music is simply the vehicle. Kuchera is arguing it's about how the interaction with the game makes one feel a certain way (empowered in this instance).

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 3, 2012 9:23:27 AM PST
PacinoBully says:
Nope. Gaming sites blocked at work...eh. Either way, with that logic karaokee is art. People feel empowered when on the stage, drunk, and singing a horrible country song.

I agree that games are art. This is just a horrible game to use as an example to argue that fact.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 3, 2012 9:25:53 AM PST
Read the article at home before you talk against it again. Seriously. You're missing the point here.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 3, 2012 9:29:19 AM PST
PacinoBully says:
"Rock Band is the best example of games as an art form"

Does it say this anywhere in the article? If so, I stand by my remarks. If not, I blame the OP and their title choice. I read what was given to me and stand by my remarks. Don't be an a$$. Not my fault the whole article wasn't posted and I have no access to it. You can block me if my remarks are such a bother.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 3, 2012 9:29:50 AM PST
GUEST!! says:
And that was the day Karaoke became considered art...

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 3, 2012 9:30:33 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Dec 3, 2012 9:31:54 AM PST
DVvM says:
The actual point of the article is: "Rock Band is the most compelling argument for video games as art, and very few series come close to proving the point that games occupy a unique place in the world of art. "

The context for that line is:

"This is why Rock Band is the best example of games as an art form. The game leverages every strength of the medium in order to share a very specific feeling, and the final product re-creates that emotion with great skill. When people bring up games as art they often talk about games that look like art, as if recreating a certain aesthetic is enough to be effective. Other people point to a game's writing, which may be done artfully, but it still doesn't make the game itself art. "

Which I believe refutes your argument.

Posted on Dec 3, 2012 9:33:08 AM PST
Soulshine says:
I think Rock Band/Guitar Hero/DJ Hero/etc. kind of games are a fine example of games as art, considering a possible motive of "art" is to elicit an emotional response from the audience. In this case, the player can get a feeling of playing music with no formal training and they get the satisfaction that they're doing *something* to make it happen.

Didn't read the article but I would if someone posts the full text.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 3, 2012 9:33:44 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Dec 3, 2012 9:34:25 AM PST
Kirksplosion says:
Here's the snippet that has that quote in it:

"The founders of Harmonix set out to create a product that shared the feeling of playing live music in front of an audience, which is a very real emotion that's created by a number of factors. It's a mixture of the thrill of being skillful at something that's difficult, the praise of an appreciative crowd, and the thrill of creating a piece of music that you enjoy. The game recreates all these aspects of the live music experience, and seeing people who have never had much success learning how to play an instrument lose themselves in the music as they nail a guitar solo on the hardest difficulty setting or hit the drums as hard as they can as they bang their head through their favorite metal song is thrilling.

There is a rush that comes when you play the game well and you're working together with those in your living room, all playing their own plastic instruments and, while it's not quite as good as writing or playing your own music, it's not far off. The ability of everyone to share in the joy of playing live music has even raised the ire of musicians who claimed the games cheapen music, or that people should just stop playing games and pick up the guitar or drums for real.

The criticism actually makes sense to Rigopulos. "People don't criticize Madden players by saying they should just go out and play football, and they don't criticize Call of Duty players by saying they should just go out and join the army," he said. "It seemed like a strange criticism to me, but the more I thought about it, the reason these games provoke this very specific cultural criticism is that no one believes that they're playing football when they're playing football, and no one believes, when they play Call of Duty, that they're really in combat. But there is a suspension of disbelief when you're playing Rock Band that you are really playing music. The simulation is much closer to the real world experience in these games than the simulation is in these other genres of games. It's this closeness that provokes the criticism. There is a genuine simulation going on."

This is why Rock Band is the best example of games as an art form. The game leverages every strength of the medium in order to share a very specific feeling, and the final product re-creates that emotion with great skill. When people bring up games as art they often talk about games that look like art, as if recreating a certain aesthetic is enough to be effective. Other people point to a game's writing, which may be done artfully, but it still doesn't make the game itself art.

The power of Rock Band comes from the ability to bring people together, teach them a skill, and then as they get better at the interaction it rewards them with a feeling that few have experienced before. It's a feeling that used to come with a high cost in terms of both time and money. This is why snobby guitarists become so precious about their craft: they want to horde that joy instead of sharing it. The argument seems to be the joy is unearned unless it comes from years of practice."

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 3, 2012 9:34:06 AM PST
No, it's because you're not arguing the point of the article. You're arguing a point the article never mentioned. Karaoke does not fall in under the same category as Rock Band in the context of the article.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 3, 2012 9:35:27 AM PST
If Rock Band is art, then art is dead.
If Rock Band is art, then now that it is dead, it should be worth a lot of money.
Rock Band is not worth a lot of money.
Therefore Rock Band is not art.
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This discussion

Discussion in:  Video Games forum
Participants:  18
Total posts:  114
Initial post:  Dec 3, 2012
Latest post:  Dec 4, 2012

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