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Help a PC novice out for Christmas?


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Showing 26-50 of 93 posts in this discussion
In reply to an earlier post on Dec 17, 2012 9:06:55 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Dec 17, 2012 9:07:41 AM PST
Base Specs:
AMD Piledriver FX-4300 CPU
8GB 1600MHz Memory
AMD Radeon HD 7750 1GB

Just be aware that the GPU is still pretty low-end. You'd have to uprade it sooner than later with a faster card.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 17, 2012 9:10:57 AM PST
Steven says:
The post was more to state how little I could afford Digital Storm than a declaration that I'm going that route, haha.

Posted on Dec 17, 2012 9:11:51 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Dec 17, 2012 9:12:57 AM PST
got mayo?™ says:
From a value perspective its:

1.Build your own.
2. Buy prebuilt on sale and configure (has windows installed, specs you want and you can upgrade the important part-Graphics card)
3. Buy a custom built 'gaming PC' (where there is profit somewhere in that equation that does not go in your pocket) You may get a nice case and some cheapo keyboard and mouse, but not the performance per dollar you want and often settle for a part you don't want that is not easy to upgrade.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 17, 2012 9:12:52 AM PST
Honestly, you could build a machine with twice the gaming power for ~$600.

If you can plug in a lamp, you can build a PC these days.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 17, 2012 9:17:27 AM PST
Steven says:
Temporarily setting aside my laziness...

I'm assuming there's a bunch of crap online that shows me how to build my own PC, yeah? I don't know why, but it feels a little intimidating since I've, y'know, never done it before.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 17, 2012 9:19:47 AM PST
It seems pretty intimidating but it's actually stupid simple. You can find step by steps on dozens of websites, as well as great tech support on PC forums, and tons of Youtube videos to show you the particulars.

Posted on Dec 17, 2012 9:20:04 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Dec 17, 2012 9:25:01 AM PST
got mayo?™ says:
Here is a $499
Acer Aspire AM3970-UR14P DT.SJYAA.003 Desktop PC - 3rd Gen. Intel Core i5-3450 3.1GHz, 8GB DDR3, 2TB HDD, DVDRW, Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit, Keyboard & Mouse

http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/SearchTools/item-details.asp?EdpNo=7375900&CatId=2627

Just add a card and a $30-$40 power supply if you want.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 17, 2012 9:20:27 AM PST
Nah, just jump right in. :) Honestly, you'll be better off for it because you'll know what parts went in and how to replace them should you want to upgrade in the future. There are dozens of people here that can help you buy parts for a solid PC and offer tips on how to build it. It's not like it used to be, you're just plugging wire A into slot A and wire B into slot B.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 17, 2012 9:23:18 AM PST
Steven says:
I'll take you up on that, if it's really that simple and if you don't mind helping me out a little bit more.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 17, 2012 9:23:46 AM PST
got mayo?™ says:
NeweggTV 'How to' videos are on YouTube, very simple...just take your time.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 17, 2012 9:24:41 AM PST
A lot of the guys here can give you tips on what parts to buy and how to put it all together. So, what's your budget, ~650 with windows before tax?

Posted on Dec 17, 2012 9:43:28 AM PST
I built my first gaming rig three weeks ago. It wasn't as hard as I thought it would be (that's what she said).

My specs:

CPU: AMD FX-8350 Vischera Eight-Core (4.0GHz)
GPU: XFX AMD Radeon HD 7870 Double Dissipation Black Edition (2GB)
Mobo: ASUS Sabertooth 990fx Revision 2.0
RAM: 16GB Viper Patriot 1866MHz
HDD: Seagate 1TB 7200rpm
Power Supply: Cosair Modular 750W
Case: NZXT Phantom Full Tower

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 17, 2012 9:43:36 AM PST
What's the 7770 compared to the 6870 like?

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 17, 2012 9:44:31 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Dec 17, 2012 9:45:28 AM PST
Youtube.com

Thousands of building videos, Newegg has a bunch too.

These days, OS is easy to setup, BIOS is pretty much already setup, plugging in hardware is beyond easy. The only things I had trouble with was plugging in the little wires into my mobo. Mainly because the wire clips were so small is my finger kept slipping lol.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 17, 2012 9:46:31 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Dec 17, 2012 9:50:44 AM PST
6870 is about 80% faster in everything but texel rate (used for AF), which is 26% faster.

The 7850 replaced the 6870/6950 and runs about 5-10% faster than the 6870. If you OC your 6870, you get about the same performance as the 7850.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 17, 2012 9:48:04 AM PST
got mayo?™ says:
7770 compares to a 6850

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 17, 2012 9:48:18 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Dec 17, 2012 9:48:35 AM PST
Oh, well then.

Gotcha Mayo.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 17, 2012 9:48:36 AM PST
Asus comes with a little adapter block for the tiny wires. You plug them all into the block first and then press the whole block onto that section of the motherboard after you've fitted all the wires to it. Cakewalk.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 17, 2012 9:49:09 AM PST
got mayo?™ says:
I always thought the 7850 performed like a 6950/6970.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 17, 2012 9:50:12 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Dec 17, 2012 9:52:46 AM PST
Yeah it's pretty close to the 6950 in terms of specs. The 6950's were only about 5-10% faster than the 6870s. They were so close that I opted for an OC'd version of the 6870 when I did my build. It wasn't worth the extra $50 at the time.

Nowadays there's a sizable leap between the 7870 and the 7950. If I were to make the choice now I'd go for the 7950.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 17, 2012 9:53:48 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Dec 17, 2012 9:54:05 AM PST
got mayo?™ says:
Weird, Toms has the 7850 as 2 performance tiers higher than a 6870...alongside the 6970, with the 6950 a tier in between them.

I would've though the difference was greater than single digit % between them.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 17, 2012 10:12:51 AM PST
Steven says:
Personally, I'd like to try and stay around the $600-700 mark. Like I said in the OP, this is going to be a gift (or gifts, seeing as how they're parts) from my mother and judging from what she showed me she wanted to buy at first, $700 seems like a safer cap.

Any extra comes out of my pocket, so it's not exactly detrimental, but I do have last minute gift shopping to do. :/

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 17, 2012 10:14:48 AM PST
I'm just going by spec numbers. The real-world benchmarks are going to be a little different, but they are fairly similar in theory.

I'm guessing the 7850 handles newer versions of DX much better then the 6000 series cards, which would increase the benchmark quite a bit regardless of minor spec differences.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 17, 2012 10:16:27 AM PST
The nice thing about building your own is you customize where your costs go.

Do you live within driving distance of a Microcenter?

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 17, 2012 10:25:04 AM PST
Steven says:
Well, if I want to take an 8 hour drive to California, then yes, it's within driving distance. I feel as though the gas would ruin my budgeting, though.

/lamejoke
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This discussion

Discussion in:  Video Games forum
Participants:  14
Total posts:  93
Initial post:  Dec 17, 2012
Latest post:  Jan 9, 2013

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