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The story in games these days are lacking....


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Showing 26-50 of 135 posts in this discussion
In reply to an earlier post on Oct 31, 2012 7:19:55 PM PDT
I've heard a lot about it, I'll keep that one in mind. I honestly don't have much interesting in any of the games after the SNES games, honestly.

Posted on Oct 31, 2012 7:40:31 PM PDT
Ham Salad says:
I think this is part of the problem with nostalgia, and looking back at the past in general. Typically, when you do this, you remember the best memories/ the best games.

You don't remember that those fantastic games like FFVI and Chrono Trigger were a tiny drop in the bucket. For every one of those, there were 100 other games that didn't even try to have a story, or tried but fell flat on its face.

Even some of the most popular games, like Super freaking Mario didn't even attempt a coherent storyline. But thats not to say it was worse off because of it.

I would say we have far better stories on average than SNES days. In fact I would guarantee it.

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 31, 2012 7:43:40 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Oct 31, 2012 8:11:54 PM PDT
I suppose that depends on whether you consider terrible story to be better than no story.

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 31, 2012 7:48:03 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Oct 31, 2012 8:00:19 PM PDT
DVvM says:
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In reply to an earlier post on Oct 31, 2012 7:52:42 PM PDT
BioShock doesn't have much of a story without the audio diaries and graffiti and Rapture itself. otherwise, it just as generic game of "start from point A. go to point B".

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 31, 2012 8:21:18 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Oct 31, 2012 8:32:54 PM PDT
I agree with you on it's core mission design. the mission structure is painfully generic. Ken Levine himself even admits he put the story on the back burner during it's long development process. I remember him saying that he didn't realize the game's story would change people's perspective on what to expect from game play. I hope he uses that as inspiration for Infinite.

Posted on Oct 31, 2012 9:04:45 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Oct 31, 2012 9:07:15 PM PDT
Ham Salad says:
"BioShock doesn't have much of a story without the audio diaries and graffiti and Rapture itself. otherwise, it just as generic game of "start from point A. go to point B"."

Well, if novels didn't have writing they wouldn't have much of a story either.

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 31, 2012 9:08:39 PM PDT
Now don't get me wrong. I think BioShock is an amazing work of art, but there's doubt the missions could of have more weight. There was some definitely some lost opportunity there, and Ken Levine himself agreed with the people who thought the same way.

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 31, 2012 9:10:32 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Oct 31, 2012 9:20:43 PM PDT
DVvM says:
The thing is though, if your game can only tell its story through text or through non-interactive cutscenes, then why isn't it a book or a movie instead of a game? (Aside from "it's more marketable as a game.")

The parts of Final Fantasy, say, in which I kill the monsters don't really contribute anything to the narrative, and the rest I have virtually no control over (beyond "you can do this inefficiently, if you want.")

Posted on Oct 31, 2012 9:14:56 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Oct 31, 2012 9:21:59 PM PDT
Ham Salad says:
Very true, I guess I misunderstood your comment.

Posted on Oct 31, 2012 9:37:49 PM PDT
who is AEK says:
Portal 1 & 2, Uncharted 2, Uncharted 3 (even if i think it's a disappointment compared to 2), Killzone 2 (for a shooter), Black Ops (surprisingly, & for a COD title)..........I play too many shooters.

Posted on Nov 1, 2012 3:43:28 AM PDT
Kin-foot says:
Deadly Premonition, before the bat poo crazy end, but still great even after that.

Posted on Nov 1, 2012 6:24:12 AM PDT
T. E. Maddox says:
Without a doubt, The Walking Dead is one of the best stories I have ever experienced in a game.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 1, 2012 10:44:27 AM PDT
That's an excellent point actually.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 1, 2012 11:41:45 AM PDT
By "These days" you really mean "The last handful of games that you in particular chose to play" right?

I recently played The Walking Dead and the story is TOP NOTCH.

Posted on Nov 1, 2012 12:25:08 PM PDT
JO MOMMA says:
darksiders 1 and 2 have a good story.

Lollipop Chainsaw was good too.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 1, 2012 12:26:06 PM PDT
Mel says:
trials evolution

Posted on Nov 1, 2012 2:43:42 PM PDT
The story is the least important part of any game I'm interested in. It's existence(or lack thereof) or quality has no effect on my enjoyment of any game.

Posted on Nov 1, 2012 2:57:54 PM PDT
"Books, on the otherhand, are frequently written simply because the author has a story he or she would wish to tell and for the actual joy of putting that story on the page. You're never going to be able to take creative risks in games like you can with books."

How so? There may not be the same creative risks, but there will be some creative risks nonetheless.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 1, 2012 3:08:14 PM PDT
All your base are belong to him.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 1, 2012 3:09:04 PM PDT
DVvM says:
I didn't say you can't take creative risks in games. I said that the creative risks in games are not as extremes as the creative risks you can take when writing.

A book is written by one person and costs nothing more to make than however much it costs that person to live. A video game is made by lots of people who are technical professionals and expect to be paid a competitive salary.

If you write a book, and it turns out that it's terrible then you're not out very much. If you make a video game, and it turns out that it's terrible you may have to shut down your company. So you can, for example, decide to write a mystery novel that never makes use of the verb "to be" and not worry too much. You're not going to feel quite as comfortable making a video game with that level of nontraditional structure.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 1, 2012 3:09:44 PM PDT
Assassins Creed is amazing

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 1, 2012 3:35:34 PM PDT
So, just so we're clear, the great works of art created by professionals who depended on their writing for a living (for example, Shakespeare) or professionals who had to take second jobs because the financial turnover from their writing career was insufficient to sustain them (for example, Melville) don't count?

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 1, 2012 3:44:44 PM PDT
DVvM says:
That's not what I'm saying at all.

A project that takes one person to complete carries less creative risk than a project that requires multiple people to complete.

A writer who depends on their writing for a living can deleteriously affect their own circumstances when they're unable to write something decent, whereas a game studio that depends on making games to survive can deleteriously affect the circumstances of dozens (if not more) of people.

So you're never going to be able to take the sorts of risks that can hurt somebody else that you can in a creative project where the lack of success hurts only you.

Posted on Nov 1, 2012 3:48:38 PM PDT
GyozaSauce says:
Shooters have good stories as well. FEAR and The Darkness have awesome story.
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Discussion in:  Video Games forum
Participants:  43
Total posts:  135
Initial post:  Oct 31, 2012
Latest post:  Nov 8, 2012

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