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Gaming Tower


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Initial post: Jul 17, 2012 8:21:24 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Nov 29, 2012 12:20:31 PM PST
SMH says:
I posted this in the computer forum as well, but it doesn't look like that place gets much traffic:

You may or may not remember that a few weeks back I posted about a gaming laptop, but I've changed my mind and am thinking of getting a tower instead...
------------------------------

I'm new to PC gaming (only been a console gamer in the past) and want to pick up something capable of running Diablo 3, Battlefield 3, Guild Wars 2 etc...

I just need a tower as I will be connecting it to my television.

Would you recommend building something from scratch (I have no experience with this) or buying a ready to go tower? If so, any recommendations for either path?

I am not a computer guy. I know what all the various terms mean but I don't know what is good stuff, what is compatible with what, etc. The extent of my computer building skills is once I installed a new DVD drive into my current tower. That's about it. Although if I found step by step instructions I am sure I could assemble a tower.

I don't have too much in the way of cost constraints, but I just want something functional, it doesn't need to be top of the line.

Any help appreciated!

Posted on Jul 17, 2012 8:23:58 AM PDT
WeaKeN says:
it all depends on how much you're willing to spend. if you can fork out $1000 you could build a nice gaming PC. or are you trying to stick around the $500-$800 range?

Posted on Jul 17, 2012 8:30:44 AM PDT
SMH says:
Like I mentioned, I'm not really too concerned about the cost, but I don't need to buy a $500 component when a $200 will suffice. I want value I guess.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 17, 2012 8:32:21 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Jul 17, 2012 8:33:59 AM PDT
If you want value, AMD processor, AMD video card, build it yourself.

Mid-tower should be more than enough room. Antec makes good cases

Antec Three Hundred ATX Mid Tower Gaming Computer Case

I have a Antec Dark Fleet DF-85 ATX Full Tower Gaming Computer Case and I love it.

Posted on Jul 17, 2012 8:36:50 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Jul 17, 2012 8:37:21 AM PDT
You get better bang for your buck and quite a bit more choice in the name of value when you build your own. If you aren't comfortable doing it though, and aren't opposed to spending a little bit more, then there isn't anything super offensive about a pre-built computer. Battlefield 3 on high settings might call for a pretty beefy computer to the tune of $1000+ for a pre-built but I imagine any entry level model around $700-800 would suffice on lower settings.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 17, 2012 8:37:38 AM PDT
SMH says:
Your case is much cooler looking than the one above it lol

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 17, 2012 8:39:17 AM PDT
SMH says:
Is it that difficult to assemble a tower though? Basically I just have to put things in the correct places and then connect all the wires, right?

I don't mean to minimize the process, so I apologize if this is offensive to PC guys. I honestly have no idea how involved it is.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 17, 2012 8:41:13 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Jul 17, 2012 8:41:45 AM PDT
No, it's fairly simple and there's certainly plenty of easy to follow literature on the subject. Sometimes sorting out random SNAFUs can be a bit of a head scratcher but it's usually something super obvious when you figure out what happened. If you're up for building I'd definitely go that route personally.

Posted on Jul 17, 2012 8:46:54 AM PDT
FV says:
I agree with T. Edwards. Building your own is the easiest way to keep costs down.

Websites like Digital Storm, AVADirect, iBuyPower, etc. can give you great PC's, but you will be paying well above $1000 to make use of their customization.

Building your own gives you access to all the parts out there, whereas with sites like above, you're limited to a select list of products. The latter forumla gives you options that you might not need, but say you want a specific Video Card or Processor, you are going to be limited to a set range of other components. Building your own gives you the opportunity to figure out your specific needs without going overboard to get that one part you really need.

Capt K. mentioned AMD. If budget is a concern, AMD is a great place to start, as you get power for less. And even if you're wallet is fat, you should still consider what can be the best bang for your buck. Building your own can be intimidating based on the amount of products out there. If you are considering going this route, the internet has more than enough resources on building a budget machine (we're talking like $700). I see you mentioned value and that's good that you have that in mind. Building your own computer is less about finding parts and more about finding value. Like you say, why pay for a $500 component, when the $200 one will do exactly what you need to.

People on this forum are more than willing to help and you have a lot of people here who know how to save you money without sacrificing power. The PC forum is good as well, but one thing I've noticed, is for many of the users on there, money is not an issue. So you end up with people suggesting products that are well above your needs.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 17, 2012 8:48:07 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Jul 17, 2012 8:50:22 AM PDT
FV says:
Lol. It really is that simple. If you can build a LEGO set, you can build a PC. The hardest part to building a PC is selecting the parts you want. Once you get past that hurdle, it's easy.

Edit: I don't mean to sound pretentious as I still have much to learn about PC's. However, when I was attempting my first build it seemed like a mammoth task and I was worried about the difficulty and would I be able to do it. I had a friend help me, but even then, once I did it, I found out just how easy it is.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 17, 2012 8:54:22 AM PDT
SMH says:
Stupid question - I found the "computer forum" but not the "PC forum." Those aren't the same thing are they?

Amazon seems to be making it increasingly more difficult to navigate to different forums...

Back to the original topic, what would you say is the most important aspect of the build? My thought would be that if I was going to spend extra on any particular part it would be the graphics card. Do you agree, or is there something else that is more important?

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 17, 2012 8:55:52 AM PDT
They probably meant the PC Game Forum

http://www.amazon.com/forum/pc%20game/ref=cm_cd_ttp_emf_rft_tft_fp?_encoding=UTF8&cdForum=Fx3GKALMXMEZ5D

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 17, 2012 8:57:39 AM PDT
SMH says:
Ah thanks.

Posted on Jul 17, 2012 9:00:10 AM PDT
SMH says:
In my limited research to this point, I feel most overwhelmed by the motherboards. I'm reading things about clock speeds, overclocking, and other jargon that I'm not familiar with, not to mention that there seems to be tons of different motherboards available. Any tips?

Posted on Jul 17, 2012 9:00:47 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Jul 17, 2012 9:10:58 AM PDT
I know very very little about putting together a gaming PC but here is what I think I've learned from reading these forums for a while.

*for processor the i5 is a good pick over the i7 unless you have money to burn.
*The power supply is more important than I initially figured it would be
*for every $800+ graphics card on the market there will be a $200 equivalent in under 2 years.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 17, 2012 9:01:59 AM PDT
FV says:
For a gaming build, the graphics card is probably going to be your biggest concern. Money wise, I'd say pay attention to the motherboard and memory - it is very easy to spend more than you have to on those components. People on here have mentioned MicroCenter quite frequently. There is one near my area, but I've never been. I'm others can tell you more about it.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 17, 2012 9:05:58 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Jul 17, 2012 9:09:07 AM PDT
WeaKeN says:
the CPU you decide on getting will have a socket type LGA 1156, LGA 1155, AM3, AM3+, FM1, etc. you'll need to make sure you get a motherboard that is compatible with your CPU socket. Some good newer CPUs for gaming are:

Intel Core i5 3570K Processor 3.4 Ghz 4 cores BX80637I53570K 229.99
AMD FX-8150 FX 8-Core Black Edition Processor Socket AM3+ - FD8150FRGUBOX 199.99

Notice the intel has a LGA 1155 socket and the AMD has an AM3+ socket.

If you're looking to save some money these CPUs are a decent choice:
AMD FX 4100 4-Core Processor, 3.6 4 Socket AM3+ FD4100WMGUSBX 109.99
AMD A8-3870K APU with AMD Radeon 6550 HD Graphics 3.0GHz Unlocked Socket FM1 100W Quad-Core Processor - Retail - AD3870WNGXBOX 107.99

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 17, 2012 9:08:46 AM PDT
SMH says:
Supply...as in the power supply?

Posted on Jul 17, 2012 9:08:50 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Jul 17, 2012 9:09:42 AM PDT
JJ4prez says:
As other have said;

Personally I would make a mid build with AMD. Then when all these crazy Intel products go down in value in 2 years; build a better Intel build.

Got with a FX4100/6870 radeon on a decent AsRock mobo with an okay 8GB RAM. Spend around ~350 on that and get a cheap 500-600W psu and decent case for around ~80 bucks more.

You will have a build that maybe cost ~500. If you have an older OS, instal that then upgrade via MicroSoft for like 60 bucks to Win 7 pro.

If you need keyboard/mouse, and monitor, all together will be ~700 bucks or so. It can happen.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 17, 2012 9:09:11 AM PDT
There's no minimizing the process, it REALLY is just that simple :)

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 17, 2012 9:10:39 AM PDT
SMH says:
I haven't heard of MicroCenter but I'll look into it and see if there is one around me.

Posted on Jul 17, 2012 9:10:48 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Jul 17, 2012 9:12:37 AM PDT
T-Bone 2.0 says:
http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/SearchTools/item-details.asp?EdpNo=2580695&Sku=B69-0556

Just need a videocard and you are good to go. Package is $304.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 17, 2012 9:11:08 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Jul 17, 2012 9:11:24 AM PDT
The general idea with a mother board is...

What is the socket type, does it match your CPU choice? (AM3, LGA...)

How much RAM does the board support, in how many slots, and of what type? (DDR3XXXX, DDR2XXXX...)

How many expansion slots are there for video cards, sound cards, and things like that? Are the choices available compatible with you video card choice? (PCI-E, PCI-E x16...)

A good starting point might be looking at CPU and motherboard combos since they will be paired and perhaps a little easier to wrap your head around as you search.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 17, 2012 9:11:09 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Jul 17, 2012 9:11:37 AM PDT
Yes.

Power Supply is extremely important. Do not skimp on it. Get a good brand and use it for your next build as well.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 17, 2012 9:11:14 AM PDT
yup
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This discussion

Discussion in:  Video Games forum
Participants:  25
Total posts:  277
Initial post:  Jul 17, 2012
Latest post:  Feb 13, 2013

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