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Customer Discussions > Weight Loss forum

Weight loss after a complete hysterectomy?


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Showing 1-25 of 37 posts in this discussion
Initial post: Jul 28, 2010 11:41:17 AM PDT
belle says:
I had a complete hysterectomy and have gained 25 pounds in one year while dieting. I read that the ovaries burn 367 calories a day. I struggled with my weight for years prior to losing my ovaries. Now, every time go out to dinner and eat normally like those I am dining with, I gain a couple of pounds and never get it off. The pounds have added up. My doctor seems to feel that there is nothing that can be done other than weight training because she said my muscle is turning to fat. I have been exercising and using weights and see little, if any change. I have researched but there seems to be little info out there for weight loss without ovaries.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 28, 2010 8:40:15 PM PDT
Book Lover says:
I suggest that you give a low carbohydrate diet a serious try. It worked wonderfully well for me. But don't expect it to be a temporary diet. It's a permanent change in your way of eating. There are loads of books out there about low carb diets. Try reading a few and figure out what makes the most sense or works best for you. Don't try to eat normally like others, learn what needs to be normal for you. It's amazing the things you can safely eat if you just cut out the carbs that turn to glucose the instant you swallow them!
Weight training is also important to help you build muscle, so keep that up. And muscle uses up way more calories than fat does even when you are just sitting still. I read somewhere that it is 70 times more, which seems rather astonishing to me. But the weight training won't necessarily help you lose any fat without an appropriate change in diet. I use the Curves (gym for women) for my weight training and you can follow their program at home if you want to. Just see their book. (Available through Amazon.) You should get at least 30 minutes of cardio almost every day. I short walk will take care of that.
Don't give in or give up! I think you can fix your problem. Me, I keep having to buy new clothes because the old ones keep getting too big.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 28, 2010 9:19:01 PM PDT
belle says:
Thanks for the suggestions and the encouragement. I have been doing low carbs. In fact, I've practically turned into a vegetarian. If I have protein for dinner, it is usually fish. I'm also walking 3 miles on the treadmill and doing the beginners Zumba video 3 or 4 times a week, as well as the weight training. If I do drop a pound I put it right back on over the weekend with one dinner out. I don't binge, but I do order whatever I want and usually even have one small piece of bread. I never have dessert. It is difficult to accept that what is normal for others isn't normal for me. It sounds like you've found acceptance and with it success. Good for you! Enjoy those shopping trips. You've earned them. Thanks again for taking the time and inspiring me to keep trying.

Posted on Jul 29, 2010 12:29:34 PM PDT
bothellbuyer says:
Have you had a thyroid panel done? Ask that reverse T3 be included in the panel as well. Problem is that most allopathic doctors will be solely interested in TSH levels and are only willing to chase that number. However, so many other aspects of the thyroid hormone pathway can be askew....you can have absolutely normal TSH levels but have most of your active T3 blocked by reverse T3 (inactive) at the cellular level...resulting in a metabolism that thwarts weight loss. Check into leptin resistance as well. Consider an anti-inflammatory diet. Consider consulting a naturopath (this was a new move for me recently....but allopathic doctors weren't as willing to look at the whole picture). Sounds like you are doing all the right things. I've been there as well, but it wasn't until I started following an anti-inflammatory diet geared towards regaining leptin sensitivity that I started losing weight. I stumbled on the whole leptin resistance/reverse T3 issue via Mary Shomon's about.com thyroid website.

http://thyroid.about.com/od/loseweightsuccessfully/a/weight-loss-diet.htm

Although I do have elevated reverse T3 levels, by following an anti-inflammatory diet, I've lost 23 lbs since mid-May and just started taking T3 this morning (prescribed by the naturopath I consulted earlier this week) so fingers crossed that more good things happen.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 29, 2010 5:20:08 PM PDT
belle says:
This may be the answer I've been looking for! I went to the website that you suggested. It makes a lot of sense. It is such a relief to finally have some explanation for the difficulty I've been having. I imagine the next step is to find a naturopath. I don't think my doctor will be very helpful, although I will show her the article and ask that she prescribe the blood tests.

In the meantime, I'm excited about trying the "anti-inflammatory diet geared towards regaining leptin sensitivity" that is working for you. Where do you suggest I find that diet? Did you find a naturopath by looking on line?

Thanks so much for the information you've already given me and especially for the hope and inspiration. Any additional advice and info would be greatly appreciated. I will certainly keep my fingers crossed and wish you continued success.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 30, 2010 7:32:09 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Jul 30, 2010 8:12:50 AM PDT
bothellbuyer says:
Initially, I started with the advice given on-line when I googled anti-inflammatory diet. Then I started purchasing books geared towards dealing with leptin resistance:

Mastering Leptin: Your Guide to Permanent Weight Loss and Optimum Health (Third Edition)

The Fat Resistance Diet: Unlock the Secret of the Hormone Leptin to: Eliminate Cravings, Supercharge Your Metabolism, Fight Inflammation, Lose Weight & Reprogram Your Body to Stay Thin-

The two above are the books I got the most from. Some advice conflicts, but I pulled out the bits that made sense to me. I have a very strong background in mammalian physiology, so that helped. I have other books I've worked from as well:

The Rosedale Diet - mostly for the supplement advice and dose timing schedule

The Anti-Inflammation Diet and Recipe Book: Protect Yourself and Your Family from Heart Disease, Arthritis, Diabetes, Allergies - and More

It sounds like you and I have been eating a basically healthy diet. However, once I started having the pain flares and saw the blood workup results for my C reactive protein (a measure of general inflammation), I got motivated at a level that was new to me (weak grin). I also have elevated reverse T3 levels and a positive ANA titer (1:160). I'd been somewhat casual about avoiding processed foods and sugar-added foods. I was more concerned about caloric intake although I was eating mostly organic foods. Now I only eat fresh fruit for my 'sweetness'. I avoid starchy carbs but do eat non-fat dairy (yogurt and kefir) and get some lactose sugar from those sources. The dairy thing is my choice and supported by the naturopath I consulted unless the food allergy blood work planned shows a problem there. I only eat fish and poultry (I'm not a vegetarian). I've never been a fan of carbonated drinks (sodas especially) so that has never been a challenge. I've added more seafood, avocados, and nuts and push the green leafy veggies. I haven't counted calories. I have lost quite a bit of my appetite after the initial week. That helps (grin)!

I had all of my initial blood workup done by my allopathic doctors, since I had strong pain symptoms. I went through the route of consultation with rheumatologists. No diagnosis but a prescription for a drug that could make me lose vision but potentially control the pain long-term. I chose to address this via diet and supplements first and was referred to a naturopath (which was covered by my health plan) by the internal medicine doctor I consulted with. It's all coordinated with my health care provider. We'll see how things go....I just saw the naturopath 3 days ago for the first time (grin). I do have post surgical hypothyroidism (only have 1/8 of a thyroid gland left), so the doctors HAVE to listen to me about thyroid symptoms.

Good luck to you. This was the first physiological explanation that seemed to 'hit' my own personal problem. As you have learned, simply caloric restriction/increased activity does not always solve the problem!

Oh...the supplements I'm taking include: coenzyme Q10, alpha lipoic acid, acetyl-L-carnitine, Tonalin CLA, fish oil. Turmeric is another to consider, but I try to do a curry a couple times a week rather than buy the more concentrated form. When I did try turmeric pills, I ended up with over-thinned blood (apparent during blood draws). I also eat raw ginger daily (in oatmeal).

Just yesterday, I started a minimal dose of T3. Remember that I get my T4 artificially, so my main concerns are about how my body converts T4 to T3 and whether the inactive form (reverse T3, which is elevated in my case) is blocking the receptors and lowering my metabolism. As I lose weight, theoretically I will be generating less reverse T3. This means a lot of blood work, but it's worth it to solve the problem!

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 30, 2010 8:27:16 AM PDT
belle says:
I actually found The Fat Resistanc Diet book on line last night and ,thanks to Kindle, I'm already on chapter 3. I also read the reviews on Mastering Leptin. There seems to be a difference of opinion regarding whether or not to snack. Do you snack? Also, have you ever cheated and what happens when you do?

I found blood test results from before my surgery. I tested positive for Rheumatoid Arthritis which confused my doctor because I had no symptoms at the time except for minor pain in my knee. I also saw a specialist in the field and he was also confused as I didn't have symptoms that confirmed the blood test.

Months later, a huge tumor was discovered attached to my ovary. I had a complete hysterectomy because the doctors were 95% sure that it was malignant. However, I had my very own miracle as it turned out to be benign. Since then the weight has piled on and my joints hurt more. I can't get anyone to take me seriously about the weight problem. The popular opinion, including my doctor's is that I'm lucky to be alive and shouldn't worry about the weight gain since body has been through a lot. I know how lucky I am but the weight is making my knee worse and I'm tired all the time. I have to find the answer and get control of my body once and for all. I am very hopeful but also worried that I won't be able to make a permanent committment to the diet restrictions. I've always been able to commit for months at a time. Perhaps if I see significant progress I'll succeed in that effort.

The nearest naturopath is 70 miles away from my home. I've recently started accupuncture. I will give that a bit more time, then consult with a naturopath.

I have to get back to my reading. It really makes a lot of sense. Thanks again for your response.

Posted on Jul 30, 2010 9:27:48 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Jul 30, 2010 9:38:09 AM PDT
bothellbuyer says:
I don't tend to snack but if I need something 'in between' it's like 4-6 almonds or a small orange. I haven't been obsessive about the 5-6 hours between meals, but I shoot for that interval. The 'little' snacking hasn't seemed to cause problems or prevent weight loss. Because I'm reliant on artifical thyroid hormone, I have to time my first and last meals anyway, so I usually stop eating between 5-6pm. I don't eat breakfast until 9am....but this is mostly due to the thyroid issues, meds I'm taking and the high levels of calcium in my meals.

With allopathic doctors, my weight issues were addressed by telling me to stop eating so much, eat 'proper' foods and exercise more. We both know that you can be doing many of those things and it isn't always the solution. I was very impressed with the naturopath I consulted. She took a much more 'big picture' approach. The internal medicine MD I consulted tried, but her background wasn't as broad in terms of dietary theory and supplements...so she is the one who suggested the naturopath after I got the results/diagnosis (or NOT) from the rheumatologist. The specialists like you to fit in their little diagnostic 'boxes'. I don't fit either (shrug). But, like you, I want to take control and at least feel like I'm trying to solve the problem. So far, I'm finding success. I hope you do as well!

Dietary restrictions: As long as I can still eat fruit, I don't miss the lovely organic whole-grain cookies (and added sweeteners) I enjoyed so much (I have a strong sweet tooth). As long as I can eat organic non-fat dairy with some plant fats added in the form of nuts....I find my new food choices sustainable. If I start going crazy, I have a chocolate Larabar (very clean....usually 4-5 ingredients...check them out). I do miss tomatoes and red peppers. I do miss peanuts. I miss bread. Those foods are my iffiest and I'm hoping the food allergy test the naturopath is setting up will help determine whether I have to stay away or can indulge occasionally. I occasionally have wild rice/brown rice with wheat berries or quinoa/sunflower seeds if I start missing my grains/bread. Pain is a great motivator....I really haven't cheated since mid-May that I can remember (weak grin). The pounds are still coming off but I'm prepared for a plateau at some point. The T3 addition may help me get a bit further down that path before I stall.

Oh...the gluten-free starchy carbs were removed from my diet not because of inflammatory concerns but to enhance weight loss.

Lunch today: Just picked up some marlin steaks. Will grill and top with avocado/non-fat organic yogurt/chopped cucumber & red onion. On a bed of baby greens. I'd love to add tomato and/or red pepper to that (weak grin), but I won't (inflammatory foods).

Also, I'm lucky in that I leave near a relatively large population center in my state and the choices are pretty broad when it comes to choosing a naturopath. There are probably hundreds within 10 miles of where I live or work, but I live just a few miles from Bastyr University.

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 2, 2010 7:37:19 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Aug 2, 2010 7:40:50 PM PDT
lanabonana says:
belle,
I have a post titled "Lost 9 lbs in 11 days with this program". Take a look at it! Then check out the site. This site talks about all those diets that are mentioned here...LOW CARB being one of them. It is a very informative site and will change the way you look at these so called diet plans! Their is no obligation to purchase the program but the information will change the way you look at weight loss.

Here is the URL: http://loseweightfast-now.com/Wow9lbsin11days.php

Let me know if you purchased this program and if it is the answer...Just post it here!!

my husband & I are convinced that this is the answer...We are both 47 and our metabolisms have slowed considerably...but this has worked for us!!

Good luck,
Lana

Posted on Aug 3, 2010 7:12:28 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Aug 3, 2010 7:45:33 AM PDT
bothellbuyer says:
lanabonana: From what I could read on the website you mention, I'm definately NOT impressed. Very superficial discussions of different eating plans are presented but there is ZERO discussion of the cellular and biochemical processes involved. I'm very curious about where a person who tries this 'magic' plan is in 1-2 years. I prefer a well-reasoned sustainable eating plan based on real data including lab results. There is no ONE reason why a person gains weight. A model based on an individual who has had organs removed that secrete hormones which affect metabolism is different from a person who doesn't. A person with an inflammatory concern has different metabolic needs than a person who doesn't. It's certainly not a one-size-fits-all world when it comes to diet plans for weight loss.

Note: This website has an interesting statement which says that a person who eats 2500 calories per day will find that their body adjusts to burn 2500 calories per day. I think most of us know that this is simply false (shrug).

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 3, 2010 9:25:30 AM PDT
lanabonana says:
bothellbuyer,
This program does work for us, as I have stated. What I am trying see is if it will work for others as well. Science has not figured out weight loss...To this date anyway. If they had no one would be overweight. I also thought the discussions were a little non-supportive with data. That is why we did our due diligence on the different ones. I believe that ALL programs work to an extent. It is the sustainability of a diet & weight loss life style that is and will be the difference. Lab results do not and will not make you lose weight. This program is and has been a life style change for my husband & I. We do not have to eat just one type of food as in low-carb diets. We do not have to purchase frozen dinners as with Weight Watchers, Jenny Craig, etc..., We do not have to go to the diet Dr. for pills that MAY some day prove to cause cancer or some other side effect. I think you catch my drift.
What I am wanting to know, in a nut shell, is IF this will work for other people...Apparently you have not tried this so not sure how this is helping.
Their is no such thing as a one-size-fits-all diet program and I hope you do not think that is what I am saying. This program has worked for my husband & I and we do not have to keep on buying and buying into the program...It is a once and done and since January my husband has gone from 187 to 168 (5'7" & 47 yrs.)and I am at my maintenance weight. (Still a woman and won't tak about my exact weight...vanity..hahaha).
So the program definitely works...for us. Now I am trying to see if it will work for others.

Best of luck in your endeavors,
Lana

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 3, 2010 9:46:22 AM PDT
bothellbuyer says:
<Lab results do not and will not make you lose weight.>

But in the case where specific physiological issues need to be addressed, they are necessary in order to make decisions about treatment (i.e. dietary) options.

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 3, 2010 7:35:59 PM PDT
belle says:
bothellbuyer and lanabonbna,
Thank you for the information and suggestions. They are much appreciated. I began the Fat-resistance diet today because it seemed to address some of my issues, although it did not address the effects of my surgery. But neither did any other diet I can find. Even on the Dr. Oz website, the only thing I could find about my ovaries was not to give them up. No help there.

Anyway, I decided to give it a go because, if nothing else, the anti-inflammatory foods might help the beginning stages of arthritis in my knee. Bothellbuyer, I do plan to read the Rosedale diet book next. I think longer intervals between meals might be best for me also as I have tried the frequent small meals with no success. So, I'm hoping to skip some of the snacks and eventually give them up completely.

In the meantime, I have begun accupuncture and am still looking for a naturopath. I think I have located a homeopathic doctor. I don't know the difference and will have to do the research.

It appears that both of you have been successful and have found the answers you need. I admire your determination and willpower. I'm hoping that I'll see some success soon and will gain the confindence and willpower to continue to pursue this path.

Bothellbuyer, how has the T3 been working for you. Are there any notable results?

Posted on Aug 4, 2010 1:33:37 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Aug 4, 2010 2:50:08 PM PDT
bothellbuyer says:
I think we all find ourselves searching for an approach that both makes sense, addresses specific needs, and is sustainable. One thing I did notice after the first week of an anti-inflammatory approach....I lost that constant appetite. I don't really have a driving need to eat. I also lost the craving for chips (corn or potato...which was probably my worst 'bad' food). Whether this is my leptin feedback loop working again and telling me I have fat to burn, I don't know (grin). But it's helped me sustain this eating approach. Several small meals per day didn't work for me at all, and the Richards books really gave me some insight from a metabolic/biochemical perspective about why that might be. I did notice in most of the eating plans geared towards regaining leptin sensitivity....most had at least one 'negative food' obsession...whether it was dairy, or egg yolks, or soy....and I just laughed that off and went the way I felt most comfortable. The 'fat resistance' book by Galland came closest to what I ended up doing but the title is misleading...it's geared towards regaining leptin sensitivity. I have a food allergy blood workup planned but that has been troublesome to get approved via my health plan....still working on that. I may end up just paying out-of-pocket (sigh).

T3....hmmmm.....not sure what to say. I started it last Thursday morning so it hasn't been a week yet. I'm not really noticing a difference plus or minus. I have had mild hot flashes which I thought were in the past, but who knows. I started acetyl-L-carnitine at about the same time (Wednesday pm) as well. My weight loss may have accelerated a bit but I have to take my weight at work in the Health Office since my own scale is off by about 5 lbs (high). Weight taken yesterday morning at work was 2 lbs less than that taken on Tuesday last week. I'm NOT shooting for huge fast weight loss anyway...I don't think that's a healthy approach, at least not for me.

edited to add: By the way, until I ended up having recurrent debilitating pain flares, I was much more casual about weight loss. I was eating in a healthy manner, but still allowed myself to eat things like small packets of Doritos from the vending machine at work (portion control), and whole grain bread. Of course, I was eating things like tomatoes and red peppers (heck, those are good healthy veggies, right?!?), without any consideration for inflammation. Seeing a C reactive protein level of 21 when the normal range peaks at 7...well, scary stuff! Pain was a much better motivator and reduced the level of will power needed. I was motivated to take control of the pain, and weight loss was secondary.

Good luck with your efforts!

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 4, 2010 3:13:05 PM PDT
bothellbuyer says:
<It appears that both of you have been successful and have found the answers you need. I admire your determination and willpower. I'm hoping that I'll see some success soon and will gain the confindence and willpower to continue to pursue this path.>

For me, success will be eliminating the pain flares and I'm not sure if I'm there yet. The pain is less intense when I do have a flare and my last flare was 7/28...but I've had a gap of up to 7 days before without flares. Time will tell. The weight loss, although something I needed to do, was secondary. I'm in an eating mode now where I'm satisfied, and I believe it's sustainable, but I am afraid to allow myself to eat anything with added sugar and get that sugar monster roaring again (sigh). As long as I can eat raw/cooked fruits without added sugar, I think I can control that monster (grin). Maybe when I reach my target weight (another 25 lbs) I'll try it and see what happens.....

Posted on Aug 4, 2010 7:07:48 PM PDT
belle says:
For me, the weight is loss is the most important. My son is getting married in June. I dread the dress shopping experience and won't enjoy the day as much if I am self conscious. I'd also like to feel happy about the pictures. 25 pounds wouldn't be anywhere near thin for me, but I think I could get something stylish and feel good about myself.

The accupuncture has lessoned the pain in my knee. I can go up and down the stairs a little more easily but it still clicks and it is very annoying. My accupuncturist thinks she can also help in getting my body to function properly. (80% is covered on my health insurance, so since my knee feels better, I'll continue.) Between the diet and the accupuncture, I'll be very disappointed if I don't see results.

The recipes are turning out to be tasty. I'm afraid to eat everything. I've always gained weight on that many calories. I'm skipping the snacks and desserts. However, I'm spending a lot of time and money food shopping. As tasty as the recipes are, I'm having a hard time figuring what to do in restaurants. I've been avoiding my friends invitations, but can't do that forever. I'm also concerned about whether or not the tempation will be too great and I'll go off the diet.

Do you dine out often? How do you handle it when you do?

Posted on Aug 4, 2010 7:32:25 PM PDT
slw says:
Bell: I may sound way too simple, but when my mom had cancer and had to do a complete hysterectomy, she did not go through menopause like she should have. Then when she did...she often said she had hot flashes and mood swings. Basically, you have become older than you should be. Cut down on calories and excersize more.

Posted on Aug 5, 2010 7:27:20 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Aug 5, 2010 9:08:14 AM PDT
bothellbuyer says:
belle: I admit that I never eat out but then I've found strange inclusions (pieces of wire, little bits of gauze bandage etc) in restaurant food so I'm icked out about being served 'mystery' food. I bring my own food to get-togethers. This isn't ideal, but at this point, I don't need to eat a 'hidden' ingredient that causes inflammation and find myself dealing with more pain flares. Everyone seems to understand, at least to my face (grin). If I could find a restaurant that served organic only and provided full disclosure of ingredients, I would consider eating out, but so far I haven't found that option. If I were only concerned about weight loss and didn't have such negative physical reactions to some foods, I would be much more casual. Again, at least in my case, it's the pain that's a motivator to stay on the 'path'.

Yes, I'm spending more on food and spending more time cooking. I do have a stash of nuts and dried fruits that I can easily put in yogurt for those times when my hands or shoulders don't work and cooking is difficult. I like to try a new fish each week from the awesome seafood section at my local Central Market (Seattle area). Last week was marlin. And I've started checking out local farmer's markets and this year at least, I'm finding much more organic produce. You have to be careful....many of the grower's are using conventional methods, some are in transition to organic and some are certified organic. I avoid the conventional local farmers....

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 5, 2010 9:20:14 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Aug 6, 2010 6:52:53 AM PDT
bothellbuyer says:
Belle: Have you had your knee evaluated by an orthopedic surgeon? I've had meniscus surgeries done arthroscopically on both knees. Don't ignore knee pain too long. If you ignore a problem like a meniscus tear, you can end up having the entire meniscus removed rather than a small tear snipped off (been there...done that...ignored the on-off pain for 12 years). My last meniscus surgery...I was back 100% within 2 weeks and was on my feet and able to do virtually anything I wanted the next day. Accupunture won't repair a meniscus tear but it can help ease the pain levels. Better to fix the problem.

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 5, 2010 4:54:52 PM PDT
belle says:
I have had it evaluated. They think it is arthritis. I don't want to start any medication because it isn't that bad yet. I'm hoping the diet and accupuncture will do the trick. I had a problem with my shoulder a few years ago. I had physical therapy followed by accupuncture. It is now pain free.

I don't think I'm going to be able to give up eating in restaurants. I understand what you are saying, but I love to go out. I especially love to travel and try new restaurants. I'm hoping I will have will power when ordering and stick to the guidelines of the diet.

Posted on Aug 6, 2010 7:35:14 AM PDT
bothellbuyer says:
I've managed the arthritis pain in my worst knee (the one that had the lateral meniscus removed in 1992 after an initial injury in 1979...oops, that was 13 years I ignored the on-off pain) with raw ginger, glucosamine/chondroitin and fish oil. This was before the transient migratory pain flares started this year. That knee is bone-on-bone in the lateral compartment, but it's really not bad pain-wise with those dietary measures unless I happen to be having a pain flare in that knee (different kind of pain). I haven't gone the accupuncture route yet (weak grin).

Good luck with your new eating plan! Don't know what to say about restaurant eating...that's not one of my 'things'. Maybe at some point there will be restaurants who offer anti-inflammatory meals like some are starting to do for gluten-free customers.

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 17, 2010 7:51:12 PM PDT
NWC says:
Well, Belle, you're average! The average weight gain the first year after hysterectomy is 25 lbs. Hysterectomy causes your metabolism to slow down, which means you won't burn calories the way you did before the surgery. If you eat the same quantity and the same food that you ate before the surgery, you will now gain weight.

You can lose the weight. Put on a plate what you would normally eat for breakfast. Take a quarter of it off your plate, and save it for the next days breakfast. Do the same with lunch and dinner. In two weeks, take another quarter off your plate at each meal, and you will succeed in shrinking your stomach, which means you will need less food, and you will lose weight.

It's also important to do some exercise. A very good form of exercise is jumping rope. It's an excellent cardiovascular workout, and builds strong muscles that help support your legs, hips and back. It's exercise that you can do at home, there's no need to go to a gym, and you can exercise in any weather. It's best to jump rope the first thing in the morning after emptying your bladder. Jump with your feet together, not one after the other. Don't be surprised if the rope only goes around two or three times the first few days, by the end of the second week you will have more stamina, and feel better.

For more information about hysterectomy and weight, and other effects of the surgery go to www.hersfoundation.org/anatomy.

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 17, 2010 7:52:57 PM PDT
NWC says:
Well, Belle, you're average! The average weight gain the first year after hysterectomy is 25 lbs. Hysterectomy causes your metabolism to slow down, which means you won't burn calories the way you did before the surgery. If you eat the same quantity and the same food that you ate before the surgery, you will now gain weight.

You can lose the weight. Put on a plate what you would normally eat for breakfast. Take a quarter of it off your plate, and save it for the next days breakfast. Do the same with lunch and dinner. In two weeks, take another quarter off your plate at each meal, and you will succeed in shrinking your stomach, which means you will need less food, and you will lose weight.

It's also important to do some exercise. A very good form of exercise is jumping rope. It's an excellent cardiovascular workout, and builds strong muscles that help support your legs, hips and back. It's exercise that you can do at home, there's no need to go to a gym, and you can exercise in any weather. It's best to jump rope the first thing in the morning after emptying your bladder. Jump with your feet together, not one after the other. Don't be surprised if the rope only goes around two or three times the first few days, by the end of the second week you will have more stamina, and feel better.

For more information about hysterectomy and weight, and other effects of the surgery go to www.hersfoundation.org/anatomy.

Posted on Aug 19, 2010 9:50:40 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Aug 19, 2010 9:53:05 AM PDT
bothellbuyer says:
Sandy: I think it's more important to consider what types of food you are eating than to suddenly restrict your food intake by half over 2 weeks as you suggest. Besides, many of us have found that caloric restriction isn't the answer. Eating the proper foods for the hormonal issue at stake can make all the difference. I've lost 27 pounds since mid-May by following an anti-inflammatory diet geared towards regaining leptin sensitivity as well as some added restrictions which I chose to expedite weight loss (which reduces inflammation). My caloric intake has certainly NOT been halved (since I've been eating more high-fat foods like nuts and avocado)but the foods I eat have substantial differences from my prior diet, although I've been eating organic, minimially processed foods for quite awhile. I cut out anything with added sugar and have greatly reduced my starchy carb intake via whole grain products and high glycemic veggies. I usually eat only one grain product (usually organic oatmeal/steel cut oats in the morning OR quinoa in the pm) per day although I can eliminate this totally if I choose.

Jumping rope is a very high impact exercise. For those with awesome joints, it's great for awhile although over time problems can arise simply due to the high impact nature of the behavior. I prefer stationary bike ( or real cycling if you live in an area where bike riding is safe) or, for those who like it, swimming. I hate swimming so stick with gardening, dog walking and biking. All are more low impact activities. I spent 6 hours working in the yard yesterday!

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 19, 2010 12:10:53 PM PDT
belle says:
Progress Report
I did well on the Fat Resistance Diet for the first 10 days. I lost 5 pounds. However, I had to cut out the snacks and therefore my calories before I started losing. I had to cut the exersize down because I lacked energy and was so procupied with shopping for the foods and cooking them. Then, my husband's vacation began. Due to my diet, we didn't plan a trip, however we were social and out and about. For eight days I had at least one meal out. I must admit that I did "cheat" minimally, which in itself is a great accomplishment for me. I remained conscious of the diet and tried to choose foods from the diet. However, I did take a bite from my husbands choices here and there, including desserts. I have gained one pound back in the eight days, rather than the eight-10 pounds I usually gain when eating out as often as I have. He is back at work, but I haven't lost anything in the past 4 days. I am having some trouble getting back to following the diet as strictly as I did before. I went back to drinking coffee, instead of tea and I'm hungry at night. I have also stopped exercising. I'm getting good at looking for excuses and putting it off. So, I've make some progress, but cannot consider myself succeeding in changing my lifestyle. I took the week off from accupuncture and returned for my weekly visit the other day. My knee is better so I'm crediting the accupuncture as well as my improved eating habits.

I appreciate your continued support, encouragement and motivation. 27 pounds since May is wonderful!
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Initial post:  Jul 28, 2010
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