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Medical Statistics: A Textbook for the Health Sciences
Medical Statistics: A Textbook for the Health Sciences
by Michael J. Campbell
Edition: Paperback
Price: $38.69
73 used & new from $30.00

5.0 out of 5 stars The progression of material is excellent, the examples are clear, July 16, 2014
I've taught out of this book three time (graduate students, fellows). It's an outstanding text for folks in a medical school environment who haven't had a basic statistics course or had one a long time ago. The progression of material is excellent, the examples are clear, and the material is pitched at exactly the right level. My copy (4th edition) does not appear to have the typos mentioned by others here.


Extending the Linear Model with R: Generalized Linear, Mixed Effects and Nonparametric Regression Models (Chapman & Hall/CRC Texts in Statistical Science)
Extending the Linear Model with R: Generalized Linear, Mixed Effects and Nonparametric Regression Models (Chapman & Hall/CRC Texts in Statistical Science)
by Julian James Faraway
Edition: Hardcover
Price: $85.41
51 used & new from $50.00

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Different Opinion, July 23, 2012
I just checked this page to find the table of contents for the book (I'm updating a syllabus) and I was shocked at these tepid reviews. I've used the book since 2005 at two different universities for a GLM course with social science graduate students. My experience is that it is a very effective teaching tool and a very well-written text. Professor Faraway does a very nice job of integrating statistical theory with the exact R code needed to run the models. Each chapter is relatively short and nicely corresponds to a single lecture of about 2 hours. The exercises are carefully constructed and appropriate given the discussion in the chapters. I also like the way that the author builds topics in fairly modular units around increased development through R code. The only aspect that I would change is that most of the data examples are from biostatistics, but that too is understandable.


Data Analysis Using Regression and Multilevel/Hierarchical Models
Data Analysis Using Regression and Multilevel/Hierarchical Models
by Jennifer Hill
Edition: Hardcover
Price: $118.28
27 used & new from $72.99

151 of 156 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Integrated Material, January 9, 2007
Gelman and Hill have put together a fabulously well-integrated look at general modeling with a focus on hierarchical structures. The book starts with simple modeling principles and continues well into material that would satisfy a third semester course in many social science grad programs. This book does something that is extremely hard: presenting serious technical ideas without overwhelming language and detail, making the chapters unusally easy to read and digest. They also do a very nice job of balancing Bayesian and traditional approaches without denigrating or over-promoting either. This should considerably broaden the appeal. Furthermore, the emphasis on R and WinBugs means that readers can immediately (and for free) run through the techniques.

I see this book as primarily a teaching tool, although many will use it as a reference. In this light, it is without peer right now in terms of coverage (basically all of the standard/basic regression models that get taught to social science grad students), price/page ratio (0.15366), and accessibility. Many of us have used econometric texts for such purposes over the years, living with a slightly mismatched set of criteria to rely on the quality of these works (Greene, Mittlehammer et al., etc.), but now there is a competitor that fits much more nicely with non-economic methods training (less of a fixation with asymptotics, no need for 200 named flavors of each model, and so on). Finally, the practical advice and admonitations that accompany the model descriptions will be immensely helpful to practitioners.


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