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E. A. Lovitt "starmoth" RSS Feed (Gladwin, MI USA)
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Embossing Folder 4.25"X5.75"-Fall Leaf Background
Embossing Folder 4.25"X5.75"-Fall Leaf Background
Price: $3.99
11 used & new from $0.95

5.0 out of 5 stars A lovely folder for many types of greeting cards, April 23, 2015
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
I make and sell greeting cards to benefit our local libraries and I like to use embossed backgrounds on many of my cards. This Autumn Leaves embossing folder adds a nice dimension to the background of my A2 (5.5" x 4.25") card faces. Please see customer image for two sympathy cards I made with this folder, one hand-colored with metallic inks and the other colored using the Distress Ink Vintage Photo ink pad. This folder embosses an intricate pattern and you might want to think about how you are going to color the raised image, if indeed you are going to color it.

I create the raised pattern on cardstock by running the cardstock and embossing folder through my Cuttlebug machine.
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Yasutomo Gel Xtreme Metallic Pens, Package of 7
Yasutomo Gel Xtreme Metallic Pens, Package of 7
Price: $7.93
26 used & new from $5.99

5.0 out of 5 stars These are easily the best metallic pens I have yet tested., April 23, 2015
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
I make and sell greeting cards to benefit our local library and am always on the lookout for pens that will add a bit of glitz and gleam to my cards. These Yasutomo Gel Xtreme Metallic pens mark beautifully on both dark and light card stock. The ink flow is very smooth. I used the copper and gold pens to color the sympathy card in the customer image. The gold has a subtle green sheen that works well for coloring leaves.

These are easily the best metallic pens I have yet tested.
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Ranger Ink Tim Holtz Distress Ink Pad Vintage Photo
Ranger Ink Tim Holtz Distress Ink Pad Vintage Photo
Offered by BIC Warehouse
Price: $6.51
6 used & new from $3.75

4.0 out of 5 stars The best ink pad for embossed paper, April 22, 2015
I generally make and sell between 150 - 200 greeting cards per year, and I like to emboss the backgrounds, and then color them so that the raised pattern stands out. I tried all sorts of ink pads until I finally found this vintage photo Distress Ink pad from Jim Holz. It's advertised as creating "an aged look on papers, fibers, photos & more" which wasn't quite what I was looking for. But it also works very well for coloring a raised pattern after I've run my cardstock through my Cuttlebug with an embossing folder. Please see the customer image for a sympathy card that I embossed with an autumn-themed folder, then colored with the vintage photo Distress Ink pad.

The only drawback to using this Distress Ink pad is that it takes a few minutes to dry. The vintage photo color will appear to be dark brown on almost any color of card stock.
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Collapsible Cat Tunnel Toy (2-Pack) [60% OFF Easter Sales!] - The Best Cat Toy - Peep Hole Design enables interactive play with your cats [2 Years Warranty & 100% Money Back Guarantee] © Pet Magasin
Collapsible Cat Tunnel Toy (2-Pack) [60% OFF Easter Sales!] - The Best Cat Toy - Peep Hole Design enables interactive play with your cats [2 Years Warranty & 100% Money Back Guarantee] © Pet Magasin
Offered by PetMagasin Direct
Price: $39.99
2 used & new from $15.75

3.0 out of 5 stars Maybe my cats are too old and set in their ways, April 22, 2015
I unpackaged the longer of these two collapsible tunnels and placed it on the living room carpet--and all four of my cats ran out of the room. I tried sprinkling cat nip into the peep hole on the top of the tunnel. That lured Reilly and Little Awful Annie back into the room, but they refused to go near their new toy. I hid some of their favorite toys in the tunnel, and the next morning, the toys were out in the middle of the floor but none of the cats would actually let me see them enter the tunnel. I tried dangling their feather toy down into the tunnel, and although Nala and Ruby came over to see what I was doing, they wouldn't go in. In the photograph, Nala is peering suspiciously into the cat tunnel and thinking, "What fresh hell is this?"

So I took the second, shorter tunnel over to my friend's house and put it on the floor. Her four cats were immediately into the tunnel and playing with the little dangling ball. Katy, the beagle also wanted to play, but the cats chased her away from their new toy.

I guess you'll have to take a chance with these tunnels. They're really cute and are advertised as durable, but their reception might depend on what mood your cat is in when you set them on the floor.

Try a little catnip if your cats ignore the tunnels. It didn't work for me, but it might work for you.

***Product supplied by manufacturer for testing and review purposes***
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Night After Night
Night After Night
Price: $7.49

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One of the most repulsive villains in all my years of reading horror fiction, April 16, 2015
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Night After Night (Kindle Edition)
Phil Rickman borrows characters from Will Kingdom's "Mean Spirit" and "The Cold Calling" for "Night after Night, but that's okay, since 'Will Kingdom' is one of Phil Rickman's pen names. My favorite and least favorite characters from the 'Kingdom' books appear in this new horror novel. Cindy Mars-Lewis, my favorite character, is a cross-dressing ventriloquist who also happens to be a shaman. In "Night after Night" he is hired to appear as a house guest in a TV mini-series called "Big Other," which is patterned after "Big Brother," a popular reality game show that originated in the Netherlands. The premise of "Big Brother," if you haven't seen it, is that a group of people live and interact together in a specially constructed house, constantly under the eyes of TV cameras. In this fictional take-off of "Big Brother," the house is supposedly haunted by the ghost of Katherine Parr, the last wife of King Henry VIII. The people chosen to inhabit the "Big Other" house are split into those who believe in ghosts and those who are skeptics.

My least favorite character from the two 'Will Kingdom' novels is Grayle Underhill, an American psychic who is hired to research the backgrounds of the 'guests' and the haunted house. She is one of nature's ditherers. The skeptical guests make her feel stupid. Actually, almost everything makes her feel stupid. Her conscience goads her to tell her boss, the ruthless head of production, the truth about Knap Hall, the haunted house that is the location of "Big Other," but she always seems to miss the most opportune moment. She vacillates and hems and haws while the horror steadily thickens.

Oh, well. We can't very well have Grayle do something decisive and spoil the steadily building climax.

In "Night after Night," Rickman has created one of the most repulsive villains in all my years of reading horror fiction. At the end of the book, he hints that many of the really foul events in this novel's back story really took place. The story is slow to build, but once the guests are assembled in gruesome old Knap Hall, the supernatural suspense slams into overdrive. Don't take this one to bed with you.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Apr 16, 2015 4:11 PM PDT


Annals of the Witch World by Andre Norton published by Doubleday Books (1994) [Hardcover]
Annals of the Witch World by Andre Norton published by Doubleday Books (1994) [Hardcover]
by Andre Norton
Edition: Hardcover
9 used & new from $9.77

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars First two Witch World books plus an unrelated fantasy that veers away from the Tregarth family, April 16, 2015
This book is actually three of Andre Norton's previous books under one title. They are "Witch World," "Web of the Witch World," and "Year of the Unicorn."

"Witch World"—Simon Tregarth is a hunted man, unjustly cashiered from the U.S. Army for dealing in the post-war blackmarket. Since he had been labeled as a crook, he figured he might as well play the game.

After seven years in the underworld, surrounded by his enemies and a gunshot away from death, Simon treats himself to a decent last meal (Andre Norton heroes and heroines NEVER whine. They assess the odds, then keep on slogging). Enter the mysterious Doctor Petronius who persuades Simon that he has nothing to lose by vanishing from his enemies' gunsights through the Siege Perilous, a Cornish megalith that is rumored to be a gate to other worlds. Simon leaves the restaurant with Petronius, almost positive that he is walking into a trap. Instead of the bullet he is expecting, our hero is transported to the foggy moors of a new world.

The action doesn't let up. The first thing Simon does is rescue a witch from a nasty bunch of snake-headed dogs and hunters (we don't learn the witch's name until the very end of the book). The next thing he knows, he's embroiled in a war where the good guys appear to be losing.

Simon allies himself with "a tall, proud-walking race with...the carriage of rulers and an odd weight of years upon them." His new home, medieval Estcarp is a matriarchate, ruled by witches, whose powers depend on their continuing virginity. Nevertheless, Simon falls in love with the witch he rescued.

The enemies that he and Estcarp must confront have invaded Witch World via a gate similar to the Siege Perilous. The alien Kolder are technically advanced, with submarines and mind-control devices that they use to command their zombie soldiers.

Estcarp's only allies are the Sulcarmen, seafaring warriors and traders who lose their main port of Gorm to the Kolder. Simon, his friend Koris of Gorm, the witch he rescued from the Hounds of Alizon, and a youthful soldier called 'Briant' tread the mysterious byways of Estcarp and its warring neighbors, in an attempt to track down and destroy the technically superior aliens.

"Web of the Witch World"—WWW (1964) is the sequel to "Witch World" (WW) and continues the story of Simon Tregarth and his witch-wife, Jaelithe. They once again find themselves in combat with the alien Kolder, who invaded Witch World through a gateway from their own dying planet. The Kolder were temporarily stymied in the WW, but Simon and his fellow warriors know that they must somehow close the gate between worlds before there will truly be an end to the alien evil.

Witch-ruled Estcarp must do battle with her own neighbors as well as the aliens. Yvian of Karsten declares open war against the witches, and they in turn believe that he has somehow been tainted by the Kolder. The Hounds of Alizon, seething with hatred against all things magical must also be tamed.

WWW is a book of battles as well as a continuation of the love stories of Simon and Jaelithe, plus pale Loyse and the sea-faring Koris of Gorm. The plot is complicated and exceptionally bloody for one of Norton's novels, but she weaves most of the plot together in the end--leaving just enough unfinished business with Alizon, the sea-faring Sulcar, Karsten, and Estcarp to bewitch the reader through many more novels.

"Year of the Unicorn"--This is my favorite Witch World novel among the many five-star novels in this series by Lifetime Grand Master of Fantasy, Andre Norton (Alice Mary North). Each setting, each character is illuminated with clear description and color, like scenes from a medieval Book of Hours. Even though I first read this book in 1965, I can still close my eyes and see Gillan and the ancient Dame Alousan gathering herbs in the high-walled garden of Norstead Abbey. I can see the twelve and one high-born maids riding forth from the Abbey – the twelve and one maids who were promised as brides to the Were-riders of the Waste.

The heroine, Gillan realizes that she is not meant for the quiet life of her vowed companions. She possesses a magic that is forbidden to the goodly Dames, and a restless curiosity that is stifled behind the stone walls of the Abbey. And so she rides forth, disguised as the bride who had threatened to kill herself rather than marry a Were-rider. In order to survive, Gillan must rely on her unschooled magic to separate illusion from reality, and true love from the snarling masks of the Were pack.

“Year of the Unicorn” is a grand adventure, a love story, a coming-of-age novel set like a jewel amidst the fantastical Dark and Light of Norton’s Witch World. ‘Unicorn’ veers away from the ‘mainstream’ WW adventures of the Tregarth family (“Witch World”, “Web of the Witch World”, “Three Against the Witch World”, etc.), but it is perfect in its own setting (the Wastes and Dales of High Hallack), and in its own right.
Comment Comments (2) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Apr 18, 2015 4:47 AM PDT


Three Against the Witch World, Beyond the Mind Barrier
Three Against the Witch World, Beyond the Mind Barrier
by Andre Norton
Edition: Paperback
12 used & new from $0.69

5.0 out of 5 stars The first book in a very fine fantasy trilogy, April 16, 2015
"Three Against the Witch World" (1965) begins a very fine trilogy of the adventures of Kemoc, Kyllan, and Kaththea, the three children of Earth-born warrior, Simon Tregarth and his witch-wife, Jaelithe. The following two books are "Warlock of the Witch World" (1967) and "Sorceress of the Witch World" (1968).

Kaththea Tregarth, born one of three triplets, could link telepathically with her birth-brothers, Kyllan and Kemoc. At an early age, she was forcibly separated from her brothers and taken to the Place of Silence to be trained in magic by Wise Women of Estcarp.

In "Three Against the Witch World" the triplets escape from witch-ruled Estcarp to the magical land of Escore. There, they accidentally destroy the false peace that had long abided between the great powers of Light and Dark. "Things awoke and gathered, and the land was troubled..." and the three learn that they must fight with the forces of Light, or be utterly annihilated by the Dark.

Kyllan, the warrior brother narrates this first book of the trilogy. After he and his brother free their sister, Kathea from the Witches, they make the long, arduous journey over-mountain to the forbidden lands of the East. Then Kaththea troubles the land by sending forth a familiar, and Kyllan is magicked and carried away by a creature of the dark in the form of a black stallion. He almost perishes but for the healing powers of the Lady of Green Silences. Once he is reunited with his brother and sister, they learn how Kaththea's witchcraft disturbed the magical balance of ancient Escore. Kyllan returns to Estcarp to recruit new soldiers for the battle to come.

The late Andre Norton was a powerful mythmaker and world-builder, and her fantasies concerning the triplets Kemoc, Kaththea, and Kyllan do not suffer in comparison with Ursula K. Le Guin's Earthsea books. In fact, my own personal preference is for Norton's Witch World.


Sorceress of the Witch World (Vintage Ace, H-84)
Sorceress of the Witch World (Vintage Ace, H-84)
by Andre Norton
Edition: Mass Market Paperback
32 used & new from $0.06

5.0 out of 5 stars This fantasy completes the very fine trilogy starring Kemoc, Kyllan, and Kaththea, April 16, 2015
Kaththea Tregarth, born one of three triplets, could link telepathically with her birth-brothers, Kyllan and Kemoc. At an early age, she was forcibly separated from her brothers and taken to the Place of Silence to be trained in magic by Wise Women of Estcarp.

In "Three Against the Witch World" (1965), the triplets escape from witch-ruled Estcarp to the magical land of Escore. There, they accidentally destroy the false peace that had long abided between the great powers of Light and Dark. "Things awoke and gathered, and the land was troubled..." and the three learn that they must fight with the forces of Light, or be utterly annihilated by the Dark.

Unfortunately, in "Warlock of the Witch World" (1967), Kaththea is wooed by the fair-seeming Dinzil, who is actually a creature of the Great Dark Ones. She who was once a powerful witch is rescued by her brother, Kemoc, but because of her near-alliance with the Dark, she is stripped of her magic. No longer can she communicate mind-to-mind with her brothers, nor perform the simplest spell of healing.

A witch without her magic is a very dangerous thing to be in Escore: a vessel waiting to be filled by the Dark. In "Sorceress of the Witch World" (1968), Kaththea attempts to return over-mountain to Estcarp to seek help from the witches, but she is caught in an avalanche and then captured by a tribe of nomadic hunters.

Andre Norton is a scholar of Amerindian history and lore, and has incorporated her knowledge in many of her novels, e.g. "Sioux Spacemen" (1960), and "The Beast Master" (1959). The dog-sleds and temporary dwellings of the Vupsall, the people who capture Kaththea, are yet another example of Norton's borrowings from history and anthropology, although this particular Escorian tribe also works metal (maybe a touch of Finno-Ugric, rather than Amerindian).

At any rate, this author's careful attention to detail will bring to life the dimly-lit interior of Utta, the Wisewoman's tent where Kaththea begins to reacquire the magic that was her birthright.

'Sorceress' completes the very fine trilogy of the adventures of Kemoc, Kyllan, and Kaththea, the three children of Earth-born warrior, Simon Tregarth and his witch-wife, Jaelithe.


Witch World (Witch World : Estcarp Cycle No. 1)
Witch World (Witch World : Estcarp Cycle No. 1)
by Andre Norton
Edition: Paperback
17 used & new from $7.59

5.0 out of 5 stars The first entry in one of the world's greatest fantasy series, April 16, 2015
How many times have you fallen asleep and dreamt you were in the fantasy world created by your favorite author? I've only had that experience once in my life and my dream took place in Andre Norton's Witch World.

This author kept me turning the pages, not only for the cliff-hangers that the hero, Simon Tregarth gets himself into, but also for glimpses of a strange new, magical landscape. She doesn't pile on the adjectives, either. Her prose is remarkably clean. Just read the lead sentence of "Witch World," which introduces us to ex-soldier, Simon Tregarth:

"The rain was a slantwise curtain across the dingy street, washing soot from city walls, the taste of it metallic on the lips of the tall, thin man who walked with a loping stride close to the buildings, watching the mouths of doorways, the gaps of alleys with a narrow-eyed intentness."

He is a hunted man, unjustly cashiered from the U.S. Army for dealing in the post-war blackmarket. Since Simon had been labeled as a crook, he figured he might as well play the game.

After seven years in the underworld, surrounded by his enemies and a gunshot away from death, Simon treats himself to a decent last meal (Andre Norton heroes and heroines NEVER whine. They assess the odds, then keep on slogging). Enter the mysterious Doctor Petronius who persuades Simon that he has nothing to lose by vanishing from his enemies' gunsights through the Siege Perilous, a Cornish megalith that is rumored to be a gate to other worlds. Simon leaves the restaurant with Petronius, almost positive that he is walking into a trap. Instead of the bullet he is expecting, our hero is transported to the foggy moors of a new world.

The action doesn't let up. The first thing Simon does is rescue a witch from a nasty bunch of snake-headed dogs and hunters (we don't learn the witch's name until the very end of the book). The next thing he knows, he's embroiled in a war where the good guys appear to be losing.

Simon allies himself with "a tall, proud-walking race with...the carriage of rulers and an odd weight of years upon them." His new home, medieval Estcarp is a matriarchate, ruled by witches, whose powers depend on their continuing virginity. Nevertheless, Simon falls in love with the witch he rescued.

The enemies that he and Estcarp must confront have invaded Witch World via a gate similar to the Siege Perilous. The alien Kolder are technically advanced, with submarines and mind-control devices that they use to command their zombie soldiers.

Estcarp's only allies are the Sulcarmen, seafaring warriors and traders who lose their main port of Gorm to the Kolder. Simon, his friend Koris of Gorm, the witch he rescued from the Hounds of Alizon, and a youthful soldier called 'Briant' tread the mysterious byways of Estcarp and its warring neighbors, in an attempt to track down and destroy the technically superior aliens.

Lifetime Grand Master of Fantasy, Andre Norton built well. There are 35 Witch World (WW) fantasies, and the count is probably still rising even though this author passed away on March 17, 2005. Many of the later WW novels were collaborations, and it wouldn't surprise me if her co-authors attempt to live on in the world that the Grand Master created. I wish them well, but so far they have not managed to penetrate the brilliantly weird landscapes of Andre Norton's imagination.


By Phil Rickman Night After Night [Hardcover]
By Phil Rickman Night After Night [Hardcover]
by Phil Rickman
Edition: Hardcover
9 used & new from $37.37

5.0 out of 5 stars One of the most repulsive villains in all my years of reading horror fiction, April 16, 2015
Phil Rickman borrows characters from Will Kingdom's "Mean Spirit" and "The Cold Calling" for "Night after Night, but that's okay, since 'Will Kingdom' is one of Phil Rickman's pen names. My favorite and least favorite characters from the 'Kingdom' books appear in this new horror novel. Cindy Mars-Lewis, my favorite character, is a cross-dressing ventriloquist who also happens to be a shaman. In "Night after Night" he is hired to appear as a house guest in a TV mini-series called "Big Other," which is patterned after "Big Brother," a popular reality game show that originated in the Netherlands. The premise of "Big Brother," if you haven't seen it, is that a group of people live and interact together in a specially constructed house, constantly under the eyes of TV cameras. In this fictional take-off of "Big Brother," the house is supposedly haunted by the ghost of Katherine Parr, the last wife of King Henry VIII. The people chosen to inhabit the "Big Other" house are split into those who believe in ghosts and those who are skeptics.

My least favorite character from the two 'Will Kingdom' novels is Grayle Underhill, an American psychic who is hired to research the backgrounds of the 'guests' and the haunted house. She is one of nature's ditherers. The skeptical guests make her feel stupid. Actually, almost everything makes her feel stupid. Her conscience goads her to tell her boss, the ruthless head of production, the truth about Knap Hall, the haunted house that is the location of "Big Other," but she always seems to miss the most opportune moment. She vacillates and hems and haws while the horror steadily thickens.

Oh, well. We can't very well have Grayle do something decisive and spoil the steadily building climax.

In "Night after Night," Rickman has created one of the most repulsive villains in all my years of reading horror fiction. At the end of the book, he hints that many of the really foul events in this novel's back story really took place. The story is slow to build, but once the guests are assembled in gruesome old Knap Hall, the supernatural suspense slams into overdrive. Don't take this one to bed with you.


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