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Cindy L. RSS Feed (Saint Paul, MN USA)

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Going to the Top: A Road Map for Success from America's Leading Women Executives
Going to the Top: A Road Map for Success from America's Leading Women Executives
by Carol Gallagher
Edition: Paperback
112 used & new from $0.01

4.0 out of 5 stars Helpful guide for current & potential female executives, June 14, 2004
This practical book provides useful insights for aspiring female executives that were gained from Carol Gallagher's interviews with more than 200 senior executive women at Fortune 1000 companies and many of their CEOs. It is divided into three parts. Part I introduces the reader to the windows in the glass ceiling these women discovered by knowing themselves and what they wanted, learning about their companies and their unwritten rules, and finding and emulating role models. Readers are asked to begin evaluating themselves and their own companies. Part II addresses six common myths and offers replacement lessons for success. For example, although results are important, four critical success factors (CORE - competence, outcomes, relationships, and endurance) are important in the big picture. Part III outlines several issues related to life at the top, including the parenting choice, work/life juggling, the experiences of minority women, and proven strategies for advancing one's career. While the guidance is sound and would also benefit current female executives by offering relief from a frequent sense of isolation, the 300+ pages made me yearn for an executive summary of the main points. Many professional women with limited time for reading would benefit from this addition to the book.


Power and Wisdom:  The New Path for Women
Power and Wisdom: The New Path for Women
by Priscilla V. Marotta
Edition: Paperback
37 used & new from $0.94

5.0 out of 5 stars A positive view of power for women, June 14, 2004
In this excellent book, psychologist Priscilla V. Marotta, PhD, provides helpful guidance for women seeking to become more comfortable with their own power. A key premise is that, while many women have learned to associate the word "power" with domination, control, and power over others, positive power is the ability to achieve, take action, and use one's power in cooperation with others. Marotta describes 10 power robbers common to many women (all of which felt very familiar) and 10 useful power lessons to replace them. I appreciated her summary of feminism from 1792 to the present; she included this because of her belief that our past provides needed keys to our future. This summary leads to a thoughtful chapter titled "Feminism Needs a Facelift," which emphasizes the need to eliminate internal conflict and focus on a common theme where all options are available to everyone...men and women. In "The Wisdom of Women," Marotta describes strengths common to many women that we need to better value and appreciate; my only concern here is that she alternates between including terms like "tend to" and using terminology that makes it sound like all women share certain characteristics (which doesn't take individual differences into account). This is a minor issue, though. She concludes with an invitation to celebrate and further women's accomplishments. Throughout, Marotta uses helpful examples with real women and a cognitive approach that provides a positive alternative to limiting ways of thinking.


The Woman Who Found Her Voice: A Tale of Transforming
The Woman Who Found Her Voice: A Tale of Transforming
by Susan O'Halloran
Edition: Paperback
37 used & new from $0.01

5.0 out of 5 stars Delightful, insightful tale of transformation, February 4, 2004
"Once upon a time, long, long ago, feudal lords ruled and serfs and peasants worked the land. In that time, there was a place, and in that place, there was a valley through which a winding river flowed." This is the beginning of a magical, hopeful fable for adults about a woman named Maria. She begins a journey of self-discovery and transformation after she loses her family to the Great Fever and is unable to protect a young runaway serf from being recaptured. As Maria rails against life's unfairness and her inability to make a difference, a hawk appears. This magical hawk enables Maria to take two different animal forms: a wolf and a turtle. She gradually learns valuable lessons about life from each animal during her challenging journey, including when to "do" and when to "be." In the end, Maria literally regains her voice and develops the ability to speak up for what she believes in a way that inspires others to action, rather than alienating them. This is an excellent gift book, for yourself or a friend.


Toward a New Psychology of Women
Toward a New Psychology of Women
by Jean Baker Miller
Edition: Paperback
Price: $16.20
232 used & new from $0.01

19 of 19 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent classic that is still insightful in 2004, February 4, 2004
This book is a classic. In the foreword to the 1986 edition, psychiatrist Jean Baker Miller mentioned her reasons for writing this groundbreaking book that was first published in 1976. First, in her work with women, she noticed that women had psychological strengths that they didn't seem to recognize or appreciate. Second, she was concerned that the model of the "new" woman seemed to be based on a male model, as if that were the only model of a complete person. Miller's goal was to "recognize, re-define and understand the day-to-day experience of women and to show how the mental and emotional lives of individual women reflect the social and political system" (back cover). She highlighted the need for change by describing the psychological damage that can result from unequal status and power in relationships. Although Miller focused on male and female relationships, the same outcome occurs whenever one or more groups are considered subordinate to the dominant group(s) because of such differences as race, sex, class, nationality, or religion; everyone involved is hurt by the inability to be authentic and complete. I appreciated her even-handed and realistic approach to differences: "Differences are a source of strength for each of us-so long as they are not used against us" (p. 136). Almost 30 years later, this landmark work continues to illuminate the problems caused by unequal relationships and opportunities for growth, which could explain why it can still be found in most bookstores.


In a Different Voice: Psychological Theory and Women's Development
In a Different Voice: Psychological Theory and Women's Development
by Carol Gilligan
Edition: Paperback
Price: $15.53
589 used & new from $0.01

62 of 69 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Good starting point for learning about women's psychology, February 4, 2004
Originally published in 1982, this book was in its 33rd printing when it was reissued in 1993. It describes the developmental differences between men and women and what that means. Harvard professor Carol Gilligan explains that male development has typically focused on separation, individuation, logic, and hierarchy. Female development, on the other hand, has emphasized attachment, relationship, connection, and communication. I had several "ahas!" while reading this book for the first time in 2003. While I've always discounted some of Sigmund Freud's work, it had never occurred to me that much of traditional psychological theory, including the work of Jean Piaget, Erik Erickson, and Lawrence Kohlberg, has also been based on observations of men, then applied to women. As a result of comparisons to male norms that don't fit their own experience, women have often felt discounted and inferior, rather than simply different. It made sense to me that these comparisons and significant developmental differences often result in women feeling selfish and guilty when focusing on their own needs, rather than those of others. It also fit my experience that men and women tend to respond differently to attachment and separation issues. According to Gilligan, men see danger more often in intimacy than in achievement, while women sense more danger in impersonal and competitive situations. Gilligan's observations have generated quite a bit of controversy over the years (as indicated by some of the previous reviews on this list!), but ring true for many women (including me), and have been used as a stepping stone for the work of many later authors.


Meeting at the Crossroads
Meeting at the Crossroads
by Carol Gilligan
Edition: Paperback
182 used & new from $0.01

18 of 20 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Articulate description of girls' journey to adolescence, February 4, 2004
This book was based on five years of interviews with nearly 100 girls between the ages of seven and eighteen at a private girls' school in Cleveland, Ohio, from 1986 - 1990. The goal of this Harvard project was to explore girls' psychological journey from childhood to adolescence. The researchers began with a more traditional approach, separating the girls into an experimental group (using open-ended, more flexible interviews) and a control group (using more standardized methods). They soon discovered that this strategy was preventing the authentic relationships needed to gather useful information, so the researchers wisely re-evaluated and revised their approach. In this well-written book, the authors clarified the issues faced by the girls studied at three stages of development-childhood, pre-adolescence, and adolescence-primarily by describing the journeys of three individual guides for each stage. For example, the stories of Jessie, Sonia, and Lauren, the three childhood guides, connect the reader to the real-life issues faced by each girl over time. The guides' moving stories clearly documented the challenging journey from being able to speak clearly, directly, and honestly about relationship issues in childhood to often negating real feelings and thoughts through disassociation by adolescence. The researchers highlighted the psychological perils of silencing one's own voice and the potential political risks of not doing so. Given the all-girl setting, one might wonder how different the results would be in a mixed-gender school. There were hopeful signs, too. By the end of the project, the school's adult women realized that they needed to overcome their own self-silencing to provide healthier role models for the girls. Also, by listening to and validating girls' experience, adults, particularly women, can serve as hopeful beacons for change.


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