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Juuku Wig
Juuku Wig
Offered by Vic's Salon
Price: $41.99
3 used & new from $28.38

5.0 out of 5 stars great wig!, January 2, 2016
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
My son (who was wearing this wig for a play) has an enormous head and it fit him fine. We didn't attach the adjustable straps at all, and it stayed on his head very well. It also looked GREAT. The picture is very true to life and the hair was very thick and shiny and bouncy. The tuft in the back was a bit flattened from the packaging, but that was the only downside.


Unschooling From Birth Through Early Elementary
Unschooling From Birth Through Early Elementary
Price: $7.49

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Why this book is a waste of time: more than you ever wanted to know, July 14, 2015
As advice for parents of preschoolers, the advice given here is not necessarily bad; the problem is, it does not claim to be a parenting manual but an unschooling manual, which it is most emphatically NOT. I'm going to evaluate this book three times: (1) as an unschooling manual, (2) as a parenting manual, (3) as a published book. Regarding my credentials to review this book: I have four teenage children whom I have unschooled from the beginning, I am well-read in homeschooling and unschooling literature, and I have been active in online homeschooling and unschooling communities for nearly 20 years. In addition, I have a degree in elementary education.

BOTTOM LINE (in case you want to skip my lengthy review): This is just an early childhood parenting book, and a skimpy, shoddy, poorly referenced one at that.

=== AS AN UNSCHOOLING MANUAL ===

The primary problem with this book is best demonstrated in the section titled "What is Radical Unschooling?" where it becomes clear that the author actually does not even truly understand what unschooling is.

FROM THE BOOK: "There's a continuum of unschooling, from "radical" to a more mixed/balanced approach."

No, there really isn't. Unschooling means no coercive educational methods, and that's all it means.

FROM THE BOOK: " "Radical unschooling" is usually defined as absolutely no curriculum or attempts at formal learning."

No, it isn't. That is actually a flawed definition of unschooling itself. Radical unschooling refers to taking the "no coercion" tenet of unschooling beyond academics and into all aspects of parenting and family life. It is also sometimes referred to as whole-life unschooling. Radical unschooling is about parenting choices, not academics.

FROM THE BOOK: "Most unschoolers, including our family, are more "moderate" unschoolers. That is, no formal curriculum is chosen (especially in the early years) and there is little external guidance -- it's mostly child-led learning. But, when children express an interest in a particular subject or area, parents specifically seek to help them learn all they can about it. This includes books, possibly textbooks, movies, field trips, and more. Nothing is "off limits" even if it is more typical of "formal schooling" so long as the child has an interest in it."

Again, we have here a flawed definition of unschooling, not a definition of moderate unschooling or some other made-up term. Specifically:

1. "No formal curriculum." Unschooling is about the parent not imposing COERCIVE educational measures on the child. It is about the parent working in partnership with the child to find and facilitate the interests of the child. Sometimes, especially as the child gets older, that may involve formal curriculum if the child chooses it.

2. "Little external guidance." True unschooling provides a great deal of external guidance. Unschooling is frequently misrepresented as being a laissez-faire, hands-off style of unparenting, when the opposite is true. Seeking out and nurturing a child's interests, as opposed to merely following a prescribed curriculum, takes a great deal of thought and time; often more than is required just following the teacher's guide. There are unschoolers who are unparents, just as there are homeschoolers and public schoolers who are unparents. That is a parenting issue, not an academic one.

3. "Parents help them learn." This is an accurate statement that contains the inaccurate implication that unschoolers (as opposed to "moderate" unschoolers) do not help their children learn if that learning would cross certain lines. The very heart of unschooling (again, not "moderate" unschooling as Tietje claims) is that when a child expresses an interest in something, the parent does everything possible to facilitate the child's interest. That may involve any number of things, up to and including textbooks and classes if it is the child's desire to pursue the subject in that way.

Look, unschooling is not some neo-Rousseauian utopia where the child is forcibly kept from anything that might sully the purity of a soul untouched by manmade systems. It is about living your life, and helping your child live her life. If you, an adult, want to learn to bake like a chef, you might well sign up to take a class for it, among other options. If an unschooled child wants to learn to bake or whatever, you the parent, in partnership with your child, will figure out the best way for her to achieve that goal. You won't deny her the opportunity to sign up for a class just because it will disturb the purity of your unschooling. Finding the best way for her to achieve her goals, just like any human being would, IS unschooling.

FROM THE BOOK: "This sort of unschooling walks the line between "radical unschooling" and more formal homeschooling. This is the general philosophy upon which this book is based -- a moderate approach."

Again, no. Unschooling is about no coercive academics. Radical unschooling, as already stated, is about parenting choices in addition to academics choices. Homeschooling is following some sort of schedule of learning, in a spectrum of choices from strict school-in-a-box curriculum to a very relaxed, child-led approach. This "moderate unschooling" Tietje keeps referencing is better defined as "relaxed homeschooling."

FROM THE BOOK: "Charlotte Mason focuses heavily on literature. This could be combined with unschooling, by doing a lot of reading. (Although admittedly I don't know much about CM philosophy; I just know several people who use it."

Okay … then why did you mention it as being compatible with unschooling if you know almost nothing about it? CM is literature-based, yes; but it is a very structured approach. Tietje convicts herself as being not well-versed in homeschooling literature or philosophy, but goes ahead and writes a whole book about it anyway, based apparently on nothing more than hearing the word "unschooling" and having two years of experience with one child, since at the time of publication, Tietje's oldest child was 7.

Tietje is not an experienced homeschooler, unschooler, or anything-schooler. She has minimal experience with a single child at beginning school age. She basically has done nothing more than parent her children in a normal, interactive way from birth to school age (see the next section of this review), then wrote a flimsy pamphlet that sort of touches on a philosophy she hasn't bothered to research. I don't object to the way she parents her children, but I strongly object to her passing herself off as an unschooling expert.

=== AS A PARENTING MANUAL ===

As to whether this book is worth it for its parenting or homeschooling advice: as I said, it's not awful, but I can't recommend it. It's not that it's wrong; it is that it is overly simplistic and ultimately unhelpful.

1. Brevity. This book is 90 pages long. The first 12 pages are devoted to poorly defining unschooling. Another 6 pages cover Tietje's personal story and explains how infants experience the world around them … as if somehow the parent would do something different about that if they hold an unschooling philosophy?

FROM THE BOOK: "A baby is learning from the moment they are born about the world around them…. An older baby learns to grab objects…. They learn to look at different colors and patterns…. All of these normal daily activities are unschooling!"

No, they aren't, they are normal child development experienced by every child, regardless of the parents' educational philosophy.

2. Simplistic parenting advice. A total of 18 pages are devoted to "Unschooling Birth to age 2," which contains gems such as "this age is tricky, in a way, because a newborn is vastly different from a two-year-old!" This is followed by a list of typical infant development and milestones, and then a section that defines tummy time, baby massage, rattles, peek-a-boo, floor time, and paper ripping as unschooling activities.

FROM THE BOOK (age 0-2 section): "Many babies love to play with water. Once babies can sit up well, put them in the bath tub with a few inches of water and some cups, a whisk, or other safe objects. There are baby-safe bubble baths you can use, too."

That is the entire section on water play. Who needs a book to tell them to do this? There is nothing about how water play helps with development, nothing about safety measures for babies playing in water, nothing actually helpful in any way. This is typical of everything in the book: an extremely abbreviated description of a typical infant activity, which can be found FREE, with better and more helpful detail, on any of a million good parenting or child development websites.

FROM THE BOOK (age 2-4 section): "Take advantage of local resources. Visit parks. Have play dates with like-minded friends. Be sure to enjoy the world."

FROM THE BOOK (age 2-4 section): "Play dough will become more sophisticated at this time."

FROM THE BOOK: (age 4-6 section): "Try making window clings that are seasonal."

The book is full of brilliantly insightful tidbits like this, and never digs any deeper into any topic it touches. Why would you need to pay money for advice like this?

It also doesn't explain how to make a window cling. Darn it.

3. Lack of citation, bibliography, footnotes, or references.

FROM THE BOOK: "Is there long-term value in "making" a child learn from a particular book if they don't want to? Will they actually gain knowledge, and if so, will they retain it? Studies show they don't."

FROM THE BOOK: "Studies show that before age 7, academics are really not necessary or beneficial."

Each time, the text immediately moves on, without answering the question "WHAT STUDIES?" or even detailing what these purported studies do and do not show.

=== AS A BOOK (AKA: Nitpicky Section for Grammarians and Publishers) ===

For those who notice such things, the production values of this book will drive you insane. It looks as if it were typeset in an old word processing program, with no effort made to step up to any sort of desktop publishing aesthetic. The font makes occasional random size changes from page to page, even from one paragraph to the next. There are no em dashes, only double dashes. (Seriously? What word processing program doesn't automatically convert to em dashes these days?) And the visually annoying double dashes are exceedingly overused, in places where commas, colons, semicolons, and even parentheses would keep the text from feeling like a student is straining to impress a teacher in his 8th grade theme paper.

Double spaces after each period … did a high school typing teacher do the proofreading on this book? Overuse of quotation marks (and for no apparent reason switching from doubles to singles on occasion); uncorrected, awkwardly auto-hyphenated text; internet acronyms and abbreviations; mistaken word choices ("diffuse" instead of "defuse"); breaking sentences into sentence fragments by misuse of semicolons where commas should be; publishing errors that anyone who has passing familiarity with any publication style manual would never leave uncorrected … all these make the book nearly unreadable even if the text lived up to its promises. If this were a novel I would have tossed it aside as unreadable by the third page. (For a good sampling, check all the quotes above, in my review; I was careful to type them exactly as they appear in the book, excessive quotation marks and all.)

A special note on quotation marks: Why do "unschooling" and "unschooler" have quotation marks every other time they appear? And why only every other time? Are we to assume this is some ironic use of the word, or that the author is euphemistically referring to something else? On a single two-page spread we have these words in this order, with and without parentheses as shown: "unschooling" - "school" - schooling - unschooling - schooling - "assignments" - "unschooling" - "developmental delay" - unschooling - "unschooling" - 'radical' unschooling - "unschooler." It make me dizzy!

=== BOTTOM LINE ===
This is just an early childhood parenting book, and a skimpy, shoddy, poorly referenced one at that.

.


Unschooling From Birth to Early Elementary
Unschooling From Birth to Early Elementary
by Kate Tietje
Edition: Paperback
Price: $10.49
21 used & new from $6.50

9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Why this book is a waste of time: more than you ever wanted to know, July 14, 2015
As advice for parents of preschoolers, the advice given here is not necessarily bad; the problem is, it does not claim to be a parenting manual but an unschooling manual, which it is most emphatically NOT. I'm going to evaluate this book three times: (1) as an unschooling manual, (2) as a parenting manual, (3) as a published book. Regarding my credentials to review this book: I have four teenage children whom I have unschooled from the beginning, I am well-read in homeschooling and unschooling literature, and I have been active in online homeschooling and unschooling communities for nearly 20 years. In addition, I have a degree in elementary education.

BOTTOM LINE (in case you want to skip my lengthy review): This is just an early childhood parenting book, and a skimpy, shoddy, poorly referenced one at that.

=== AS AN UNSCHOOLING MANUAL ===

The primary problem with this book is best demonstrated in the section titled "What is Radical Unschooling?" where it becomes clear that the author actually does not even truly understand what unschooling is.

FROM THE BOOK: "There's a continuum of unschooling, from "radical" to a more mixed/balanced approach."

No, there really isn't. Unschooling means no coercive educational methods, and that's all it means.

FROM THE BOOK: " "Radical unschooling" is usually defined as absolutely no curriculum or attempts at formal learning."

No, it isn't. That is actually a flawed definition of unschooling itself. Radical unschooling refers to taking the "no coercion" tenet of unschooling beyond academics and into all aspects of parenting and family life. It is also sometimes referred to as whole-life unschooling. Radical unschooling is about parenting choices, not academics.

FROM THE BOOK: "Most unschoolers, including our family, are more "moderate" unschoolers. That is, no formal curriculum is chosen (especially in the early years) and there is little external guidance -- it's mostly child-led learning. But, when children express an interest in a particular subject or area, parents specifically seek to help them learn all they can about it. This includes books, possibly textbooks, movies, field trips, and more. Nothing is "off limits" even if it is more typical of "formal schooling" so long as the child has an interest in it."

Again, we have here a flawed definition of unschooling, not a definition of moderate unschooling or some other made-up term. Specifically:

1. "No formal curriculum." Unschooling is about the parent not imposing COERCIVE educational measures on the child. It is about the parent working in partnership with the child to find and facilitate the interests of the child. Sometimes, especially as the child gets older, that may involve formal curriculum if the child chooses it.

2. "Little external guidance." True unschooling provides a great deal of external guidance. Unschooling is frequently misrepresented as being a laissez-faire, hands-off style of unparenting, when the opposite is true. Seeking out and nurturing a child's interests, as opposed to merely following a prescribed curriculum, takes a great deal of thought and time; often more than is required just following the teacher's guide. There are unschoolers who are unparents, just as there are homeschoolers and public schoolers who are unparents. That is a parenting issue, not an academic one.

3. "Parents help them learn." This is an accurate statement that contains the inaccurate implication that unschoolers (as opposed to "moderate" unschoolers) do not help their children learn if that learning would cross certain lines. The very heart of unschooling (again, not "moderate" unschooling as Tietje claims) is that when a child expresses an interest in something, the parent does everything possible to facilitate the child's interest. That may involve any number of things, up to and including textbooks and classes if it is the child's desire to pursue the subject in that way.

Look, unschooling is not some neo-Rousseauian utopia where the child is forcibly kept from anything that might sully the purity of a soul untouched by manmade systems. It is about living your life, and helping your child live her life. If you, an adult, want to learn to bake like a chef, you might well sign up to take a class for it, among other options. If an unschooled child wants to learn to bake or whatever, you the parent, in partnership with your child, will figure out the best way for her to achieve that goal. You won't deny her the opportunity to sign up for a class just because it will disturb the purity of your unschooling. Finding the best way for her to achieve her goals, just like any human being would, IS unschooling.

FROM THE BOOK: "This sort of unschooling walks the line between "radical unschooling" and more formal homeschooling. This is the general philosophy upon which this book is based -- a moderate approach."

Again, no. Unschooling is about no coercive academics. Radical unschooling, as already stated, is about parenting choices in addition to academics choices. Homeschooling is following some sort of schedule of learning, in a spectrum of choices from strict school-in-a-box curriculum to a very relaxed, child-led approach. This "moderate unschooling" Tietje keeps referencing is better defined as "relaxed homeschooling."

FROM THE BOOK: "Charlotte Mason focuses heavily on literature. This could be combined with unschooling, by doing a lot of reading. (Although admittedly I don't know much about CM philosophy; I just know several people who use it.)"

Okay … then why did you mention it as being compatible with unschooling if you know almost nothing about it? CM is literature-based, yes; but it is a very structured approach. Tietje convicts herself as being not well-versed in homeschooling literature or philosophy, but goes ahead and writes a whole book about it anyway, based apparently on nothing more than hearing the word "unschooling" and having two years of experience with one child, since at the time of publication, Tietje's oldest child was 7.

Tietje is not an experienced homeschooler, unschooler, or anything-schooler. She has minimal experience with a single child at beginning school age. She basically has done nothing more than parent her children in a normal, healthy, interactive way from birth to school age (see the next section of this review), then write a flimsy pamphlet that sort of touches on a philosophy she hasn't bothered to research thoroughly. I don't object to the way she parents her children, but I strongly object to her passing herself off as an unschooling expert.

=== AS A PARENTING MANUAL ===

As to whether this book is worth it for its parenting or homeschooling advice: as I said, it's not awful, but I can't recommend it. It's not that it's wrong; it is that it is overly simplistic and ultimately unhelpful.

1. Brevity. This book is 90 pages long. The first 12 pages are devoted to poorly defining unschooling. Another 6 pages cover Tietje's personal story and explains how infants experience the world around them … as if somehow the parent would do something different about that if they hold an unschooling philosophy?

FROM THE BOOK: "A baby is learning from the moment they are born about the world around them…. An older baby learns to grab objects…. They learn to look at different colors and patterns…. All of these normal daily activities are unschooling!"

No, they aren't, they are normal child development experienced by every child, regardless of the parents' educational philosophy.

2. Simplistic parenting advice. A total of 18 pages are devoted to "Unschooling Birth to age 2," which contains gems such as "this age is tricky, in a way, because a newborn is vastly different from a two-year-old!" This is followed by a list of typical infant development and milestones, and then a section that defines tummy time, baby massage, rattles, peek-a-boo, floor time, and paper ripping as unschooling activities.

FROM THE BOOK (age 0-2 section): "Many babies love to play with water. Once babies can sit up well, put them in the bath tub with a few inches of water and some cups, a whisk, or other safe objects. There are baby-safe bubble baths you can use, too."

That is the entire section on water play. Who needs a book to tell them to do this? There is nothing about how water play helps with development, nothing about safety measures for babies playing in water, nothing actually helpful in any way. This is typical of everything in the book: an extremely abbreviated description of a typical infant activity, which can be found FREE, with better and more helpful detail, on any of a million good parenting or child development websites.

FROM THE BOOK (age 2-4 section): "Take advantage of local resources. Visit parks. Have play dates with like-minded friends. Be sure to enjoy the world."

FROM THE BOOK (age 2-4 section): "Play dough will become more sophisticated at this time."

FROM THE BOOK: (age 4-6 section): "Try making window clings that are seasonal."

The book is full of brilliantly insightful tidbits like this, and never digs any deeper into any topic it touches. Why would you need to pay money for advice like this?

It also doesn't explain how to make a window cling. Darn it.

3. Lack of citation, bibliography, footnotes, or references.

FROM THE BOOK: "Is there long-term value in "making" a child learn from a particular book if they don't want to? Will they actually gain knowledge, and if so, will they retain it? Studies show they don't."

FROM THE BOOK: "Studies show that before age 7, academics are really not necessary or beneficial."

Each time, the text immediately moves on, without answering the question "WHAT STUDIES?" or even detailing what these purported studies do and do not show.

=== AS A BOOK (AKA: Nitpicky Section for Grammarians and Publishers) ===

For those who notice such things, the production values of this book will drive you insane. It looks as if it were typeset in an old word processing program, with no effort made to step up to any sort of desktop publishing aesthetic. The font makes occasional random size changes from page to page, even from one paragraph to the next. There are no em dashes, only double dashes. (Seriously? What word processing program doesn't automatically convert double dashes to em dashes these days?) And the visually annoying double dashes are exceedingly overused, in places where commas, colons, semicolons, and even parentheses would keep the text from feeling like a student is straining to impress a teacher in his 8th grade theme paper.

Double spaces after each period … did a high school typing teacher do the proofreading on this book? Overuse of quotation marks (and for no apparent reason switching from doubles to singles on occasion); uncorrected, awkwardly auto-hyphenated text; internet acronyms and abbreviations; mistaken word choices ("diffuse" instead of "defuse"); breaking sentences into sentence fragments by misuse of semicolons where commas should be; publishing errors that anyone who has passing familiarity with any publication style manual would never leave uncorrected … all these make the book nearly unreadable even if the text lived up to its promises. If this were a novel I would have tossed it aside as unreadable by the third page. (For a good sampling, check all the quotes above, in my review; I was careful to type them exactly as they appear in the book, excessive quotation marks and all.)

A special note on quotation marks: Why do "unschooling" and "unschooler" have quotation marks every other time they appear? And why only every other time? Are we to assume this is some ironic use of the word, or that the author is euphemistically referring to something else? On a single two-page spread we have these words in this order, with and without quotation marks as shown: "unschooling" - "school" - schooling - unschooling - schooling - "assignments" - "unschooling" - "developmental delay" - unschooling - "unschooling" - 'radical' unschooling - "unschooler." It make me dizzy!

=== BOTTOM LINE ===
This is just an early childhood parenting book, and a skimpy, shoddy, poorly referenced one at that.

.


Natures Oven by Reco Clay Baker, #117
Natures Oven by Reco Clay Baker, #117

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars The description is wrong; this is GLAZED, June 2, 2014
This is advertised as the #117 UNglazed baker, but I received item #99117 which is GLAZED. What is even the point of a clay baker if it is glazed? This is being shipped directly back.


No Title Available

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Very lightweight plastic, February 26, 2014
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
True, the swing arm that presses the cheese down feels like cast metal. However, the body of the grater is a lightweight plastic. In addition, the barrel of the grater is of course metal but the rotating handle and the circles that hold the grater barrel in place are downright flimsy. We grate a lot of cheese and I do not expect this to hold up very long at all.


Buckle Up: Design your own altered art buckles
Buckle Up: Design your own altered art buckles
by Mrs Ronda Hillis
Edition: Paperback
Price: $17.99
4 used & new from $17.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars an experienced instructor is a great help!, November 13, 2013
Ronda Hillis has been in the altered art jewelry business for over two decades, and definitely has the skills to pass on! Clear pictures and step-by-step instructions from a master will help you create exactly what you want.


To Train Up a Child
To Train Up a Child
by Debi Pearl
Edition: Paperback
175 used & new from $0.01

61 of 80 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars find a parenting book that doesn't have abuse warnings in the reviews, August 30, 2013
This review is from: To Train Up a Child (Paperback)
The advice in this book has frequently been implicated in a condition of "failure to thrive" for infants, in cases of severe abuse of children, and in the deaths of at least three children (search for Sean Paddock, Lydia Schatz, and Hana Grace-Rose Williams). When such tragedies happen, the Pearls claim that the parents' actions are "diametrically opposed to the philosophy of No Greater Joy Ministries and what is taught in the book."

Maybe so, maybe this is not what the Pearls are intentionally teaching. But clearly, at a minimum, the teachings of this book and No Greater Ministry are easily and frequently misconstrued by readers, and easily and frequently result in this type of abusive parenting. What does that say about this book, if even ONE person could so deeply misunderstand the parenting advice it conveys? And yet it is not just one isolated parent; instead it happens with such intensity that there are court cases investigating the Pearls and this book, and it happens with such frequency that there is an entire website devoted to collecting such reports, helping those who have suffered this abuse, and giving resources for a better way of parenting. Please look at the website Why NOT Train a Child before moving forward with this purchase.

When you're looking at other parenting books, check the one-star reviews. What do they say? "Poorly written" and "doesn't work" might be good reasons to pass it by, but they aren't red flags. Multiple reviews citing abusive behavior as a result of applying the "wisdom" written in the book, however, should be a 100% guaranteed NO SALE.
Comment Comments (4) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Sep 6, 2013 10:15 PM PDT


Low-Carb Slow Cooker Recipes
Low-Carb Slow Cooker Recipes
by Better Homes and Gardens
Edition: Plastic Comb
41 used & new from $0.01

2.0 out of 5 stars Low-carb buyer beware!, January 13, 2013
This looks like a perfectly decent slow cooker cookbook, which is why I gave it two stars instead of one. But putting "low carb" in the title and saying it's full of recipes "for carb counters" is wildly misleading. Hint #1: just putting the carb count on the recipe, without modifying it to actually make it low-carb (like, I don't know, maybe taking potatoes out!) does NOT make it a cookbook for low-carbers.

I'll give just one example: the Dijon Pork Chops call for a can of condensed cream of mushroom soup and potatoes to create a recipe with 39 carbs per serving. Unbelievable! Just for comparison, the two chop recipes in Dana Carpender's 200 Low-Carb Slow Cooker Recipes are Tangy Pork Chops for 11g carbs and Mustard Pork Chops for only 4g carbs. Hint #2: neither one uses a can of condensed soup or any sort of root vegetable.


How I Learned
How I Learned
by Shamus Young
Edition: Paperback
Price: $13.02
10 used & new from $10.75

11 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This is why I homeschool ..., December 14, 2011
This review is from: How I Learned (Paperback)
This. THIS is why I homeschool my kids. I did not have a terrible school experience as Shamus did; in fact I skated through pretty easily and without attracting too much attention except for my good grades. Most people would point to me as a great example of how well school works, but even so, school was not a good "fit" for me. I was rarely challenged and got the grade without having to study; I was bored out of my mind for most of every day and only my low-key personality and good home life kept me from getting into trouble. The questions Shamus so cogently asks cast my own feelings about school into sharp relief:

"Did school help this person to reach their full potential?" No, it absolutely did not.

"Could they have learned more on their own?" Oh yes, and most of what I did learn came from my own extra-curricular reading and exploring.

"Could they have learned faster using some other system of instruction?" Absolutely. I can't begin to count the times I had to sit while the class went over and over and over a point of instruction that I knew before the teacher opened her mouth, or I got on the first explanation.

Industrial factory schooling is not a good fit, in fact, for most kids, not just the obvious misfits such as Shamus. Kids like Shamus are the canaries in the mine of the public school. They're the first ones to show that there is a problem, and we need to read his story with the understanding that when the most susceptible children react so very visibly to experiences in a "normal" school, then we need to be seriously worried about how it is affecting all of our children.


Disney Tinkerbell Fairy Friends Signature Cake Topper
Disney Tinkerbell Fairy Friends Signature Cake Topper

2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars great cake topper, terrible stamps, September 22, 2011
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
As cupcake toppers for my daughter's 8th birthday, these figurines were charming. However, I doubt I would have paid this price for JUST cake toppers. I chose this set because each figurine also has a stamp on the bottom - which makes them as much of a toy for afterward as a decoration. However, as stamps these are USELESS. Each fairy has a small raised ring on the bottom, with a stamping design inside the ring. The problem is, the stamp design is actually slightly recessed inside the ring - so that all you get when you stamp is an empty circle!

Fine (though expensive) cake toppers but exceedingly poor design for the stamp.
Comment Comment | Permalink


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