Profile for E. Bovee > Reviews

Browse

E. Bovee's Profile

Customer Reviews: 2
Top Reviewer Ranking: 18,513,908
Helpful Votes: 4




Community Features
Review Discussion Boards
Top Reviewers

Guidelines: Learn more about the ins and outs of Your Profile.

Reviews Written by
E. Bovee RSS Feed
(REAL NAME)   

Show:  
Page: 1
pixel
The Wave: In Pursuit of the Rogues, Freaks, and Giants of the Ocean
The Wave: In Pursuit of the Rogues, Freaks, and Giants of the Ocean
by Susan Casey
Edition: Paperback
Price: $13.63
198 used & new from $0.01

3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Poorly Researched. Poorly Articulated. Poorly Written., April 16, 2012
The one- and two-star reviews on 'The Wave' are consistent, and I have to agree with most of them. This book isn't about waves. You will learn little or nothing about them, or about the professionals who study or interact with them: salvage experts, oceanographers, physicists, ship captains, yachtsmen, divers, fishermen. There are a few vignettes, but the bulk of the book comprises sketches of big wave surfers preparing for sessions, or surfing. And these sections are as cursory and inarticulate as the rest of the book. How do big wave surfers train? How did they learn to do what they do? Why are they exceptional? How do their obsessions affect the rest of their lives? The reader won't come away with much insight into what is probably the least interesting subject matter in the book, men who slide down waves again and again for fun. And even the surfers are largely unable to describe themselves.

The book is written in the style of a chatty email and there is little effort to convey, even in simple terms, any of the science behind waves. The author attends a conference on waves and claims that it was all too hard to understand, so she doesn't bother. Why is she writing a book 'in pursuit of the [...] giants of the ocean'? She doesn't seem to find any real answers on Laird Hamilton's patio, either.

Compare this book to an excellent example of popular science and oceanography - Dava Sobel's 'Longitude'. Both books were best sellers. Both won accolades (Casey's book has a surprising endorsement from the New York Times). It's stupefying that both books could achieve very similar credit in the same universe.
Comment Comments (2) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Dec 14, 2013 10:09 PM PST


The Wave: In Pursuit of the Rogues, Freaks and Giants of the Ocean
The Wave: In Pursuit of the Rogues, Freaks and Giants of the Ocean
by Susan Casey
Edition: Hardcover
Price: $18.96
323 used & new from $0.01

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Poorly Researched. Poorly Articulated. Poorly Written., April 16, 2012
The one- and two-star reviews on 'The Wave' are consistent, and I have to agree with most of them. This book isn't about waves. You will learn little or nothing about them, or about the professionals who study or interact with them: salvage experts, oceanographers, physicists, ship captains, yachtsmen, divers, fishermen. There are a few vignettes, but the bulk of the book comprises sketches of big wave surfers preparing for sessions, or surfing. And these sections are as cursory and inarticulate as the rest of the book. How do big wave surfers train? How did they learn to do what they do? Why are they exceptional? How do their obsessions affect the rest of their lives? The reader won't come away with much insight into what is probably the least interesting subject matter in the book, men who slide down waves again and again for fun. And even the surfers are largely unable to describe themselves.

The book is written in the style of a chatty email and there is little effort to convey, even in simple terms, any of the science behind waves. The author attends a conference on waves and claims that it was all too hard to understand, so she doesn't bother. Why is she writing a book 'in pursuit of the [...] giants of the ocean'? She doesn't seem to find any real answers on Laird Hamilton's patio, either.

Compare this book to an excellent example of popular science and oceanography - Dava Sobel's 'Longitude'. Both books were best sellers. Both won accolades (Casey's book has a surprising endorsement from the New York Times). It's stupefying that both books could achieve very similar credit in the same universe.


Page: 1