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Jason Brill RSS Feed (Marietta, PA United States)

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Enochian World of Aleister Crowley
Enochian World of Aleister Crowley
by Lon Milo DuQuette
Edition: Paperback
Price: $15.80
69 used & new from $6.05

9 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Just like its companion, but much, much older...., April 22, 2003
The Enochian Keys are given a new dimension of life in this book. Like it's companion, Crowley's Illustrated Goetia, Uncle Al has, once again, managed to simplify, by cutting out the fat and getting right to the meat of the matter. Taking an ancient, and very hazy subject that few have written about, Aleister Crowley, et al, have taken the Angelic keys - attributed to Enoch himself - and brought them home. Now anyone can utilize the power of the ancient spirits to channel a part of themselves that lies dormant. But, beware! For, just like Solomon's Goetia, Enochian calls have been warned about for centuries. Whether for research or for practical use, this book belongs on anyone's list of invocation magick.


Aleister Crowley's Illustrated Goetia
Aleister Crowley's Illustrated Goetia
by Lon Milo DuQuette
Edition: Paperback
Price: $16.95
69 used & new from $9.59

6 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Simpicity in motion, April 22, 2003
Maybe I'm biased (I haven't read a book by Crowley that I didn't like) but this is an amazing read. Taking the Solomonic Lesser Keys to their logical conclusion and simplifying the entire Lemegeton, Crowley, et al, have managed to bring the ritualistic calls of the Goetia home. Just like his easy-to-follow-if-you're-willing-to-take-it-at-face-value version of the Enochian Keys, Crowley provides you, the reader who dares, all you need, without any of the fat, to invoke and evoke the fallen angels of Solomon and take a more powerful course of action in your life. But beware! Goetia has a bite that has been warned about for centuries. Whether for research or for practical use, this book should be at the top of your list of must-haves in the invocation genre of Magick.


The Illuminati Papers
The Illuminati Papers
by Robert Anton Wilson
Edition: Paperback
Price: $14.52
85 used & new from $2.24

24 of 40 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars To the reviewer from Dayton, April 22, 2003
This review is from: The Illuminati Papers (Paperback)
You've obviously never used a Ouija Board. By the way, R.A.W. has done it again - telling it like it is (from his point of view, anyway). To those who aren't sure whether or not to take him seriously, just remember - Hermes was a trickster, but he was the only way out of the underworld. Welcome to Wonderland.


Transcendental Magic
Transcendental Magic
by Eliphas Levi
Edition: Paperback
Price: $26.95
42 used & new from $15.57

5 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Mr. Waite's Wild Ride, April 9, 2003
This review is from: Transcendental Magic (Paperback)
This book is an excellent read for any level of initiate, though I would not necessarily recommend it to a candidate. The level of confusion that can ensue to beginners of the path of the Great Work is an ounce of help and a pound of trouble. But to any intitiate his doctine and ritual is enlightenment.
A word of warning, however. Everything within should be taken with a grain of salt, and this includes the translators footnotes. When Waite quotes, he is directly to the point. But his incessant need to nit-pick and analyze every key note within is unnerving and extraneous. As if Arthur Edward Waite had nothing better to do than to translate the adepts and tear their doctrines apart, he seems to miss the point entirely. Acting as Levi's own interpretation of Oedipus, Waite gives the answer of MAN! to the sphinx, thus crumbling an agenda and his own kingdom. Holding far too fast to the form and forgetting the force, he manages to critique to death far too many avenues, almost making the reader wonder why he/she should even bother. As an example, in the very first chapter of Doctrine (or Dogma, depending on the interpreter), with a blatant display of ignorance, Waite refuses to accept the attribution of the "Emerald Table" to Hermes Trismegistus - and a more irrelevant point could make for none the worse. Noted scholars have already addressed the issue, time and again, of Eliphas' insistence upon his oath of non-revealing to the point of encoding this work for the adept, and the adept alone, as Levi himself hints at several times within the first introduction.
The footnotes aside, the manuscript is an invaluable key for meditation on the Qabalah, the Tarot and any other system of initiation in any style. Read, think and act upon this book with fervor.


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