Profile for Leslie > Reviews

Browse

Leslie's Profile

Customer Reviews: 399
Top Reviewer Ranking: 3,486
Helpful Votes: 764




Community Features
Review Discussion Boards
Top Reviewers

Guidelines: Learn more about the ins and outs of Your Profile.

Reviews Written by
Leslie RSS Feed (Midwestern USA)
(VINE VOICE)   

Show:  
Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11-20
pixel
Maidenform Flexees Women's Shapewear Camisole, Black, Medium/12
Maidenform Flexees Women's Shapewear Camisole, Black, Medium/12
Price: $15.35
5 used & new from $14.90

4.0 out of 5 stars Feels nice and provides light support, December 20, 2014
Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
I love the feel of the fabric - it is very soft and smooth, holds its shape and provides light support. It is well-made and survives well in the wash.

The only problem I have is that there is not enough 'give' in the fabric to allow me to easily pull it on over my head. It's a struggle to get it on and a greater struggle to get it off.

Note that these camisoles run a size small. I have been wearing this brand for years and always need to go up one size for a good fit.


American Spirit: An Exploration of the Craft Distilling Revolution
American Spirit: An Exploration of the Craft Distilling Revolution
by James Rodewald
Edition: Hardcover
Price: $13.88
51 used & new from $9.50

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A fascinating look at craft distilling from the business owners point of view, December 18, 2014
Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
I have been aware that a craft brewing industry existed for some time and enjoy sampling local beers at area restaurants, but until I read this book, I didn't know the same thing is now happening with spirits. While there was definitely a need for better and tastier beer, spirits, on the other hand, already had a wide variety of tasty offerings. So I wondered: Why the boom in craft distilling?

Author James Rodewald, former drinks editor for the now shuttered Gourmet magazine, shows us why the craft spirit industry is flourishing. In this unique book he takes us across America and introduces us to several dozen individuals who have chosen to start a distilling business - at times against great odds - and lets them tell their stories.

The book is broken into chapters by regional areas and profiles some of the stand-out businesses and their owners. Sprinkled throughout are photos, drink recipes and short asides with interesting tidbits of information.

It's fascinating that the industry thrives at all considering the mish-mash of laws governing the business. Regulations vary between states, and local ordinances can be challenging; a remnant of the prohibition era. Plus, the distillers are at a disadvantage when compared to beer and wine producers: laws are stricter, tastings are not allowed, and home distilling is illegal. One interesting observation was that almost every distiller was, at one time, a lawbreaker as most of them had to learn how to distill somewhere before they opened their businesses.

I was expecting this book to be more of a historical account about the world of craft distilling - its history, progress, and where we are today. Instead, I found a book about the people involved in the business rather than a linear history. We do learn about the business, but it is through individual experiences and personal stories; a book those interested in the subject are sure to enjoy.


Household Essentials High Side Magazine Rack, Rattan
Household Essentials High Side Magazine Rack, Rattan
Price: $27.30
5 used & new from $27.30

5.0 out of 5 stars Attractive and well-made with metal framing and thick weaving, December 18, 2014
Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
This is a large magazine holder with high sides, about 11 inches tall, and can easily hold over a dozen magazines. I filled it with my magazines that were scattered about the house and they now look neat and orderly. The high sides keep them standing straight and there is no flopping over.

The rack is very well-made with metal framing and thick weaving. Rattan holds up well over time - I have a basket that has been in constant use for 30 years and this is a similar quality.

The color and style is attractive and looks great in my living room. Now I need one to tidy up my office.


SOYJOY Snack Bar, Cranberry, 1.05 Ounce, 12 Count
SOYJOY Snack Bar, Cranberry, 1.05 Ounce, 12 Count
Price: $15.99
3 used & new from $15.99

4.0 out of 5 stars Sensible snack containing natural ingredients, December 18, 2014
Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
I usually carry granola bars in my purse or pocket for a quick burst of energy and to avoid the temptation to stop at a fast-food place. I'm always on the look-out for other healthy options and alternatives to junk food and candy bars, so the SOYJOY Bars seemed like a good choice.

The SOYJOY Bars are made from natural ingredients. They're not very large - about an ounce - but I found eating only one to be quite filling. Each bar contains 140 calories, with 50 of those derived from fat, and one bar contains 12 grams of sugar.

I usually find soy to be a bit bland tasting, but these are pretty good. The addition of the cranberries are big plus - they give it a little burst of flavor. While the bars feel like they would be moist, the texture is a little dry. It's difficult to describe because they are not like any other snack bar I've eaten; different but ok. Because they contain real fruit and are gluten free, I will recommend them to my friends/family on a gluten-free diet, but for me I still prefer my granola bars.


When Books Went to War: The Stories that Helped Us Win World War II
When Books Went to War: The Stories that Helped Us Win World War II
by Molly Guptill Manning
Edition: Hardcover
Price: $19.66
11 used & new from $15.66

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The perfect read for history buffs or anyone who just loves books., December 16, 2014
Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
During World War II millions of books were distributed to soldiers during a little known part of history that is brought to life in When Books Went to War.

Initially libraries, publishers, and the public banded together to collect books in a nationwide Victory Book Campaign, but it soon became apparent that it wasn’t working as well as they would like. Most of the books were hardcover and many were inappropriate cast-offs, such as knitting or children’s books, which needed to be sorted and disposed of. But many books did make it to the soldiers who enjoyed the reading material and wanted even more titles.

The book program was so popular that the Army created the Council on Books in Wartime to take over the task of getting appropriate books to soldiers. The Army, along with publishers, devised a lightweight, portable book specific for shipment overseas – the Armed Services Edition, or ASE.

I knew there was a book program during WWII, but I had no idea of its extent and influence. The paperbacks we have today owe their existence to the need to reduce the bulk and weight of the books. Previously books were mostly hardcovers with Penguin and Pocket Books being the only paperback labels. The Great Gatsby was rescued from obscurity to become the classic it is today thanks to ASEs.

Mixed in with the story of the books is an account of America’s involvement in the war and the challenges facing soldiers sent far from home, away from their family and friends. Not only do we learn how the army was able to get millions of books to the soldiers, but also what the books meant to them, and how many became lifelong readers because of these books. Towards the end of the war more non-fiction was included, and this often inspired them to choose a career and attend college on the GI bill.

I learned a lot from this book – not because I didn’t read history, but because I had not previously come across this information. It’s all here in an interesting and very readable style. A short but thoroughly researched book, this is the perfect read for history buffs or anyone who just loves books.


The Innovators: How a Group of Hackers, Geniuses, and Geeks Created the Digital Revolution
The Innovators: How a Group of Hackers, Geniuses, and Geeks Created the Digital Revolution
by Walter Isaacson
Edition: Hardcover
Price: $21.00
83 used & new from $11.63

5.0 out of 5 stars A very readable historical account for anyone interested in the digital revolution, December 16, 2014
After reading, and absolutely loving, Isaacson’s biography of Steve Jobs, his new book about the people who were instrumental in the computer revolution was a must-read for me. Unlike the in-depth biography of Jobs, this was an expansive survey of the many individuals who played a part in the development of the tech world we know today.

Isaacson begins in the mid-1800s with one of the earliest innovators, the mathematician Ada Lovelace, poet Lord Byron’s daughter, and moves through history in a linear fashion to today’s internet. I was pleased to see Ada and other women pioneers – programmers during the Enigma code breaking period – getting their fair share of time in the book. An illustrated timeline is included in the front of the book, which is a helpful reference to have as the large number of people introduced in the book can be a little overwhelming at times, especially during the early years.

This is a very readable historical account for anyone interested in the subject, and is suitable even for those with only a moderate background in tech – and that’s most of us. If you use a computer, tablet, laptop, or smartphone, you already know the basics.

Unlike people born during the 80s who have not experienced a time without personal computers, I went to school in the 70s – a world that barely had pocket calculators much less mobile phones or PCs. I am still in awe of the tech revolution and found most of the book very relatable. The first half was an enlightening history lesson to for me, but once we arrived in the 1980s, it was a fun trip down memory lane as I revisited the ‘innovations’ I grew up with – 300 baud modems, bulletin boards, CompuServe, Gopher, dialing up AOL to access the internet, and my outrageously expensive computer with its 486DX2-66 processor and 8MB RAM. Yes, that’s MB not GB, but I digress.

While the book is not 100 percent inclusive, it’s an interesting and entertaining look at the people who had the most influence on the tech we use today.


Juice Beauty Blemish Clearing Cleanser, 6.75 fl. oz.
Juice Beauty Blemish Clearing Cleanser, 6.75 fl. oz.
Price: $22.00

3.0 out of 5 stars Works best on oily areas of my skin, December 15, 2014
Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
Juice Beauty Blemish Clearing Cleanser is a good cleanser, but not one I can use every day with my combination skin. Everyday use was far too drying for my skin type. I found it to be most effective when used several times a week and only on the areas of my face that are oily and prone to blemishes.

I like that it doesn't contain harsh chemicals and is made from natural ingredients. It has a mild scent but for the most part it's fragrance-free. For skin in need of a deep cleansing, this would be a good product to try.


A Thousand Pieces of You (Firebird)
A Thousand Pieces of You (Firebird)
by Claudia Gray
Edition: Hardcover
Price: $11.37
51 used & new from $7.85

4.0 out of 5 stars Enjoyable trip through the multiverse, December 14, 2014
Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
Marguerite's parents have invented a device - the Firebird - that allows travel throughout the multiverse. The multiverse is a possible set of hypothetical universes also known as parallel or alternate universes. As the story opens, Marguerite's father is murdered and the prime suspect is Paul, a physics graduate student and her father's assistant. He steals the Firebird and jumps to another universe.

With the help of friend Theo, Marguerite chases Paul through the multiverse and along the way learns much about herself, her relationship with Paul and Theo, and who really wants control of the Firebird.

I don't usually read YA books, but I'm a sucker for time-travel and alternate universe stories regardless of whether or not I'm the target audience. I picked this one up on a whim after gazing at the beautiful cover and was under the impression that it was primarily science fiction.

YA always has its share of teen angst, and that's ok. What I wasn't expecting in this book was a lot of romance. At first I was a little annoyed, but the writing was good and the underlying story was holding my interest. I enjoyed the world-building in the different universes and it was enough for me to almost overlook the inclusion of a love triangle. As much as that device is overused in YA books, and it seemed unnecessary at first, it did work in the end due to a couple of plot twists.

The story is narrated by Marguerite and we view the different universes through her eyes. There aren't a lot of technical details, and this is science fiction only because characters are able to jump to alternate universes. When they arrive in the new universe they temporarily take over the body of the person who actually belongs there but how the device works isn't explained.

This is the first book of a new trilogy, but it is a complete story with an ending and no cliffhanger. It was enjoyable, escapist reading that I liked a lot more than I expected to.


AmazonBasics Portable External Battery Charger - 5,600 mAh
AmazonBasics Portable External Battery Charger - 5,600 mAh
Price: $24.99

5.0 out of 5 stars Quickly recharges phone, tablet batteries, December 13, 2014
Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
The AmazonBasics 5,600 mAh Battery Charger arrived almost fully charged, out of the box. It comes with a short USB cord and a cloth carrying case. It is lightweight and has a slim, attractive profile.

After topping off the battery to a full charge, I tested it on my nearly depleted Galaxy S4 phone battery. The S4 was at 15% - it took the external battery 1 hour and 45 min to bring it to a full charge. This is just as fast as using the OEM charger and a wall outlet. There are four LED lights on the battery, each indicating 25% power. The battery was 50% depleted after the first charge and had enough left in it for a second charge of my husband's Galaxy S5.

The external battery does not come with a wall charger but will readily connect to most smartphone chargers or a USB port. To recharge the battery, it took about 4 hours using a 5.0V, 2.1A wall charger. It will charge slower using a computer USB port.

I'm pleased with the performance of the external battery. It performs well and does what it is supposed to do.


Viva Labs Magnesium Bisglycinate Chelate: Highest Level of Absorption, 200mg Elemental Magnesium per Serving, 240 Tablets
Viva Labs Magnesium Bisglycinate Chelate: Highest Level of Absorption, 200mg Elemental Magnesium per Serving, 240 Tablets

4.0 out of 5 stars Quality product, December 11, 2014
Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
I take a magnesium supplement to reduce leg and muscle cramps. I recently switched to the Viva Labs brand of magnesium and have been taking it for the past few weeks.

My concerns when taking supplements - or changing brands - are possible stomach upset or skin reactions to the inactive ingredients that may be lurking in the pills. That was not a problem with the Viva Labs. I have taken them with or without food and they have digested just fine.

Other than the large size of the pill, I am happy with the product.


Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11-20