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Customer Reviews: 28
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Helpful Votes: 197




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N. Henderson RSS Feed (Minneapolis MN, USA)
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Grado Prestige Series SR80e Headphones
Grado Prestige Series SR80e Headphones

7 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Lovely! Money well spent., August 1, 2014
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
I first tested these headphones with a song that I knew well; about half-way through the singer hit a certain note, and it gave me chills, as if I had never really heard it before.

The clarity is excellent; my usual consumer headphones are very obviously (and painfully) 'muddier' in comparison. I'm hearing little things I never noticed before, like a singer puckering her lips before the song, and tiny background noises on live performances.

Power is impressive. At full power (as an experiment) snare drums still sound so crisp and hard it feels truly percussive to your head, with minimal distortion (although at 'ear damaging' power levels they do seem to have a little buzz at some mid-upper frequencies.)

Grado likes to test their headphones with jazz (among other things) and I can see why! They're quite nice with anything, but they really do soar with jazz. I could pick out each note of any of the instruments on Nina Simone's "Sinnerman"; each voice is so clear!

I would agree with reviewers who complained that the earpieces can become mildly uncomfortable over time. For me, the solution was simply to gently bend the headphone's band so they gave a more relaxed fit. Still, it would be worthwhile for Grado to explore ergonomics a bit more, not just sound quality.

As others have noted, bass is normally milder than with most headphones, but what's there is just as strong, clear, and beautifully formed as the higher notes. Most music players have an equalizer that can boost the bass if you like; these headphones ARE perfectly capable of producing strong bass; they just don't automatically go beyond what the original recording called for.

I was skeptical of spending so much money on 'mere headphones', but I'm glad I gave in to this small temptation.


Case of Green Glue Noiseproofing Compound - 12 Tubes
Case of Green Glue Noiseproofing Compound - 12 Tubes
Offered by TrademarkSound
Price: $192.50
3 used & new from $192.00

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Victory, sweet victory! But it wasn't easy or cheap...., July 26, 2014
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
The main point you need to know is that GG and an extra layer of drywall can help...but don't expect anything too dramatic from just that. My problem was noise coming from a downstairs bedroom (darn kids!) going through the ceiling and into the master bedroom. So, I went all in:

1. Rip out the existing drywall ceiling. This isn't terribly hard; cut the drywall tape along the corners with a utility knife, then start a hole somewhere with a drywall saw (or hammer if you feel like it) and start pulling sections down.

2. Screw strips of drywall to the underside of the exposed upstairs floor with a layer of GG in between. Building codes aside, I would suggest using as few screws as needed to solidly secure the panels. For ALL new drywall, use the heavier 5/8" sheets; mass is your friend. The floor will be normally be about 3/4" thick, so 1.25" drywall screws will work nicely for the first layer.

3. Add a second layer of GG'd strips of drywall to the underside of the floor. If you have the patience and ambition, run a bead of acoustic sealant around the edges (so none of the floor is exposed.) At this point you have two layers of drywall and two layers of GG clinging to the underside of the floor. For this layer, you'll need longer screws to reach the floor (such as 1.75")

4. Attach whisperclips (or other sound isolation clips) to the bottoms of the trusses or floor beams (to provide support for the new ceiling.) This will take some thought, taking into account that the furring channel (25 gauge, 7/8") should be placed two feet apart, with clips at the ends and every four feet in between. You'll also want to carefully position one of the steel channels where there will be a joint between sheets of drywall (so both sheets can be screwed onto it.)

5. Clip furring channel into the clips. I found it easiest to mark where I wanted the ends to be, screw those clips into place, then clip in the channel, and then add any additional clips. (The channel is flexible enough that you can pull it down enough to slip more clips on it.) A common frustration is where to get these steel channels; I found them at a regional home supply store (Menards), or some Home Depot stores carry them. You may have to mail-order them in the end. RESILIENT CHANNEL is NOT an alternative! (This is the stuff that has holes cut in it. You want the solid stuff for use with clips.)

6. Install a layer of insulation. You actually want open insulation (such as the cheap fiberglass rolls) rather than closed-cell foam. I went with thick R-19 faced rolls.

7. Screw the first layer of 5/8" drywall to the furring channel. Your 1.25" drywall screws will work for this. To hold the sheets of (fairly heavy) drywall in place while you work on them, you'll either want to rent a panel lift or have a couple of strapping young lads to take advantage of. ;-)

8. Seal the edges and any gaps with acoustic sealant.

9. Time for more GG! Now, the second layer of 5/8" sheetrock goes up! Goop up the backside of a sheet with a random pattern of GG, using around two tubes per 4'x8' sheet. If you wish you can increase the dose to about three tubes for a small additional gain in damping. The GG is fairly watery, and dispenses quite quickly and easily. These are the 'big' tubes; you'll need a large caulk gun (not the smaller size often used for caulking in bathrooms, etc.) Repeat until the entire second layer of drywall is up (with a layer of GG in between the layers.)

10. Seal significant gaps with acoustic sealant or expanding foam or such. Finish and texture as you normally would with drywall.

Did it work? YES! Before, even normal conversational voices could often be heard between upstairs and downstairs bedrooms. Now, even with music at a 'high normal' volume (ie. about as loud as a sane person would want to listen to music for an extended period at) it remains dead silent in the other room. It was a lot of work (and all told, materials and tool costs ran close to a thousand dollars for about 170 sf of ceiling/floor) but I'm very pleased with the results! Now, it's hardly an absolute barrier to sound; loud noises (like somebody really rocking out with their stereo or loud yelling) can still penetrate. But normal noise is no more!

A few closing thoughts...

GG cures very slowly. It can still be tacky several weeks after being dispensed, so it's not surprising that it doesn't take full effect for weeks. It does generally easily wash clean with water, although if a film of it dries on your hands it can be hard to completely get rid of the tackiness. The smell is very mild and inoffensive.

If you have ductwork running through the ceiling, consider making some soundproofing efforts there as well (such as by wrapping it with an adhesive mass loaded vinyl type product.) If there is a duct feeding into the room through the ceiling, the gap between it and the new ceiling can easily be filled with expanding foam insulation, and the grill simply screwed onto the new drywall.

Light fixtures will need some consideration. Surface mounted fixtures can be easily removed; after feeding the wires through holes in the new ceiling, seal up any gaps with expanding foam or acoustic sealant. The light fixture itself can be secured to the ceiling with anchors and bolts (look around your local home store.)

If you have recessed lighting, they need special attention; search for how to assemble a box around them to prevent sound transmission through the fixture.

Good luck! It's not a small project, but if peace and quiet is important to you, there is definitely hope!


No Title Available

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Kills flukes...and some plants!, July 5, 2014
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
Well, call that a surprise; this medication largely wiped out my plants. (A rare side-effect for a medication, particularly one fine-tuned to take out specific animal life forms.) The effect was quite selective; swords were fine, tiger lotus (lilies) were fine, floating plants were fine. Anacharis, most of the cabomba, and all of the valisneria perished.

Oh well! It does appear to have wiped out my fluke problem, and with a tankful of discus the plants are by far the lower priority to protect. Minimal signs of any stress to the fish (including about fifty cardinal tetras) and no need to re-dose.

I've learned my lesson; nothing gets added to 'the big tank' without a complete quarantine and prophylactic treatment regimen first!


Green Glue Noiseproofing Whisper Clips - 10 Pack
Green Glue Noiseproofing Whisper Clips - 10 Pack
Offered by TrademarkSound
Price: $57.80

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars and I really like that you can mount these after the furring channel ..., July 5, 2014
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
Thoughtfully designed and solidly built. Lab tests suggest that it works as well as any of the competing clips, and I really like that you can mount these after the furring channel is already clipped in; it takes away one small headache. If you're looking for an isolation system, you really can't go wrong with these.

As always, attack soundproofing from a holistic standpoint; read up, understand how sound gets around and plan a total solution. No one product, in of itself, is likely to give completely satisfactory results.


Troy DPH11 Professional Series 11 Foot Drywall & Panel Lift Hoist
Troy DPH11 Professional Series 11 Foot Drywall & Panel Lift Hoist
Offered by Factory Authorized Outlet
Price: $149.99
4 used & new from $149.99

5.0 out of 5 stars A decent product at a heck of a good price, July 5, 2014
Construction is a little unpolished (some obvious paint flaws), but it feels solid and is working well around my house.


Michelangelo: Complete Works
Michelangelo: Complete Works
by Frank Zöllner
Edition: Hardcover
9 used & new from $459.74

5.0 out of 5 stars Indulgent, yes. Why is that wrong?, June 30, 2014
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
I'm one of those people (derided by another reviewer) who is happy to spend $140 on a gigantic, lushly produced art book to read once, thoroughly enjoy, and then stick on a coffee table.

If such a notion makes sense to you, buy this book and be confident that you'll enjoy the thick glossy paper, glorious photos, the scholarly (without being unbearably dense with jargon) writing, and the details of the Sistine Chapel that you just can't see very well in person. (That being said, I highly recommend seeing the work in person if you get the chance; viewed at its intended distances and under dim 'natural' light, the experience is very different; the figures are strikingly three-dimensional, seeming to project outward from the surface of the ceiling.)


Ecology of the Planted Aquarium
Ecology of the Planted Aquarium
by Diana Walstad
Edition: Hardcover
Price: $33.75
7 used & new from $33.75

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A little dry, rather technical...and brilliant., May 17, 2014
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
I can understand why some people are wary of this book; if science isn't your field, you'll have to work a bit to really absorb some of the material.

That being said, this is the single most important, useful book I've ever come across for aquarists. It gives simple, rock-solid, rigorously researched advice on how to create a thriving, healthy (and even low-maintenance) home for your fish.

So, wade on in, take the time to read (and re-read a little). You (and your fish) will be rewarded!


30 Sqft Cable Set, Electric Radiant Floor Heat Heating System with Aube Digital Floor Sensing Thermostat
30 Sqft Cable Set, Electric Radiant Floor Heat Heating System with Aube Digital Floor Sensing Thermostat
Offered by Warming Systems Factory Direct
Price: $189.00
2 used & new from $164.43

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A tremendous value!, January 19, 2014
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
The thermostat is attractive, sophisticated and fairly user-friendly (you can have it heat the floor only at times when you're home, and it can figure out when to start heating in order to reach the target temp by the programmed time.)

Importantly, the thermostat has a built-in GFI (ground fault interrupt), which is required by many local building codes (and simply a good idea.) It isn't mentioned in the product listing, but it's there, so no worries.

Test and test and test (the heating wire and the temperature probe) before you commit to cementing it into your floor. All you need is a resistance reading with a multimeter.


[ManiaGear] Motorola Moto G Black Rubberized Hard Case Shell + Screen Protector & Stylus Pen
[ManiaGear] Motorola Moto G Black Rubberized Hard Case Shell + Screen Protector & Stylus Pen
Offered by Star's Shop
Price: $8.90
4 used & new from $5.40

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Generic, practical., December 29, 2013
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
The hard case fits well on my Moto G, and has a reasonably good hand feel (not slick, but not nearly as grippy as the rubber of a heavy-duty case like an Otterbox.) The screen protector went on with no unusual trouble, and has only a slight effect on the feel and appearance of the screen.

Overall, I'm satisfied with it.


Lincoln Electric Viking Black 3350 Welding Helmet - K3034-1
Lincoln Electric Viking Black 3350 Welding Helmet - K3034-1
Offered by AirweldOnline
Price: $225.00

5.0 out of 5 stars Expensive, but nice., December 15, 2013
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
Great visibility! It's not a tank (there are tougher helmets out there) but it's very comfortable, well built, and has the features I needed (particularly a good sensitivity adjustment, so it can be de-tuned so it won't darken from other people welding in the area.)

This helmet has quickly become an object of desire around the shop; I'm sure we'll be getting more.

As others have noted, the 'grind' setting (which keeps it from auto-darkening) is a setting on the shade dial, so you have to re-select your shade level each time after using the grind mode. It's a minor annoyance (a well placed on/off switch would be better). If you're doing a lot of switching between welding and grinding, you might be better off with one of the flip-up visor designs.


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