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STARZ Play (Kindle Tablet Edition)
STARZ Play (Kindle Tablet Edition)
Offered by Appstore - US - MP - Offer
Price: $0.00

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Serious Stability Issues, March 2, 2014
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This app seriously needs a work over. The video freezes and the app crashes constantly on bith my Kindle Fire HDX's! The video quality is also subpar...SD at best. considering bow vood the HBO Go app is, starz needs to do some work!


Firefly Season 1 [HD]
Firefly Season 1 [HD]
Price: $31.99

5.0 out of 5 stars Great Series that Fox Killed For No Good Reason, February 28, 2014
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
Ahhh... Firefly!!! One of the greatest Science Fiction/Westerns ever to grace the small screen. Unfortunately, Fox exercised terrible judgment in killing it off after 13 episodes. If only this could have been produced today, where it would have been featured on cable (FX, SyFy etc.) on something other than a lousy Friday night slot. I know this will never be brought back, but it would have been nice to at least have a quasi-spin off that takes place within the Firefly universe--perhaps with different characters and storyline. Summer Glau has been pretty quiet lately--I am sure they could use her as main character. :) Joss, I know you're busy with your movies, but food for thought???


Flick Golf Extreme
Flick Golf Extreme
Offered by Appstore - US - MP - Offer
Price: $1.99

1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Lots of fun!, December 5, 2013
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Flick Golf Extreme (App)
I am not of a gamer, but this a fun one. I ended up staying up 3 hours later than planned playing this stupid game. :-)


Battlestar Galactica: Blood & Chrome (Unrated Edition)
Battlestar Galactica: Blood & Chrome (Unrated Edition)
DVD ~ Luke Pasqualino
Price: $5.00
20 used & new from $1.99

2 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This deserves to be a full fledged series!, February 19, 2013
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
They "pilot" really was well done and has enough going for it to warrant the greenlight for at east a season. God, they gave Caprica a full two 10 episode seasons and that wasn't a tenth if the show that the pilot was. It's a shame that SyFy is no longer interested in science fiction any longer. They killed of the franchises that made them relevant with nothing inspired to take their places. Sure, I could use a little more edge and less Hans Solo and Luke Skywalker, but B&C at least was exciting to watch.


QCELL 2X SAMSUNG GALAXY SIII 2100MAH BATTERY + FREE UNIVERSAL BATTERY CHARGER (COMPATIBLE WITH SAMSUNG GALAXY S3 GT-I9300, SPRINT L710, VERIZON I535, T-MOBILE T999, AT&T SAMSUNG I747, U.S. CELLULAR R530)**WITH NFC CAPABILITIES FOR S BEAM & GOOGLE WALLET**
QCELL 2X SAMSUNG GALAXY SIII 2100MAH BATTERY + FREE UNIVERSAL BATTERY CHARGER (COMPATIBLE WITH SAMSUNG GALAXY S3 GT-I9300, SPRINT L710, VERIZON I535, T-MOBILE T999, AT&T SAMSUNG I747, U.S. CELLULAR R530)**WITH NFC CAPABILITIES FOR S BEAM & GOOGLE WALLET**
Offered by QCellDirect

0 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great deal!!! AS good as OEM!, July 25, 2012
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
The appears to perform as advertised. I have been using both batteries for about a week and they both seem to perform identically to the Samsung OEM battery. I really see no difference at all in performance. I have not tested the NFC functionality of these batteries (or the factory battery for that matter), so I cannot comment on that feature. Nevertheless, this battery is priced similarly to other non-OEM batteries and appears to be the only aftermarket battery available for the GS3 that has NFC capability. That puts it ahead of the pack even without testing. My only gripe with this package is the included wall charger. The battery hangs over the charger a bit. This is not a big deal, but this charger is clearly a generic. It also charges the batteries very SLOWLY. From 20% to full charge can take 12 hours!!!! I have been charging the phone on a Blackberry quick charger 10v, which seems to charge the battery from 20% to full charge in about 4 hours (pretty slow). The GS3 is a slow charger to begin with, but I was expecting a little better performance from a dedicated wall charger. With three batteries now in rotation, this isn't a big deal--but something to keep in mind. In short, this has been a great product so far and a very good deal. :)


Samsung Galaxy S III, Blue 16GB (Sprint)
Samsung Galaxy S III, Blue 16GB (Sprint)
Price: $459.99
14 used & new from $128.46

371 of 394 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Great Phone, but Not Perfect!, July 13, 2012
The GS3's sexy specs and glossy good looks (particularly in pebble blue) won me over. On launch day, I swapped my beloved Droid Razr Maxx, for the Samsung Galaxy S3. Prior to the Maxx, I briefly owned the Verizon version of the GNexus (which I can't recommend at all). Before I get into the nitty gritty details, with pro's, con's and comparisons, at the time of this review, this is the phone you have been waiting for--the phone that will make you use that upgrade or cause you to sign a ridiculous contract with Verizon. After spending ten minutes with the phone, it's an obvious step up from the Razr Maxx and Galaxy Nexus--the former top tier Android phones on Big Red's network.

Performance

As much as I loved my Razr Maxx (and its marathon 2-3 solid days of battery life), after spending a few minutes with the GS3, the performance leap is very noticeable. The GS3 is silky smooth, with no lagginess at all. Apps (particulary heavy duty games like GTA III) launch quickly and are game play is flawless. I know many of you aren't going to play anything requiring more than the occasional fling of a few angry birds, but the GS3's ability to handle hardcore mobile games with ease is a sure fire indicator that it will be able to run 99.9% of the apps out there in two years. In other words, this phone has the chops to allow you to make it through your contract without starting a countdown for your next upgrade.

How about some real world examples of the GS3's muscle? The Qualcomm S4 chipset with an industry leading 2gb of Ram can cut through 1080p video files like butter. Surprisingly, it was able to play back a 23.5 mbps AVCHD file using hardware decoding decoding!!! I was even able to take play back the file with the video in screen, while I did a couple of google searches. The average $400 laptop would have a tough time handling that!

The GS3 doesn't disappoint on the audio side either. While HTC touts its Beats Audio Technology, that's nothing more than a brand name equilizer setting with limited value-- unless you're spend $100 or more on a beats headphones (which I personally don't care for). Sammy, on the other hand, dropped in two Wolfson digital to analog converters, which allows the GS3 to pump out lossless high bit rate music with ease. Using a pair of Etyotic HF3 IEM earphones, sound quality was crisp and clean for music playback. Even lossy tracks streaming from Amazon Cloud sounded surprisingly full. Much more so than on some other phones that I own. In terms of music playback, the GS3 is every bit the equal of the iPhone and possibly a little better.

The Screen

The's GS3's 4.8", 720p HD screen is a stunner! The Super AMOLED panel provides rich color saturation and outstanding contrast. The panel used to make the screen is beautifully fabricated. the slight curve in the design makes it a pleasure to touch. Text is crisp and I see no issue with this most recent implementation of pentile technology. The fuzziness from Galaxy S, GNexus and Fascinate is a thing of the past. Watching videos on the GS3 is a treat.

All is, however, not perfect with the GSIII's screen. While the contrast and color saturation are strong points for the phone, if you like natural color tones, the pumped up saturation levels may bother you. Personally, I would dial back the saturation level if I could. The GS2 had a settings menu that allowed users to tweak brightness, contrast, tint and saturation. For reasons I don't understand, that great feature was some how left behind on this next gen phone, which is a real pity.

While saturation is a matter of taste, the real issue with the screen though is brightness. Even cranked to 100%, the screen still seems to be a few nits behind the curve. I would love to be able to dial up to 120%. The maximum brightness is noticeably less bright than the screen on the Maxx (which Motorola sourced from Sammy). So, what gives? I am not sure, but my best guess is that in the interest of improving battery life and to compensate for the size of the screen (and the power that size screen will suck), Sammy choose to put a software restriction that limits the ability of users to pump of the brightness. Hopefully, this can be cured by a future firmware update.

While the brightness could use a boost, this deficiency is further amplified by awful auto-brightness implementation. When auto-brightness is turned on, the phone makes sudden and drastic adjustments in brightness even in a consistently well lit setting. It seems as if the software has only 3 settings for brightness when it is set to auto--low, medium and high (which isn't that high to begin with). The phone will drop from high to low suddenly, leaving the screen unreadably dark. Until Sammy sends out a software update to fix the problem, I have disabled the auto-brightness feature.

Software Implementation

The user interface for this latest version of touchwiz is really very nice. This phone provides IOS levels of comfort and ease of use to a smartphone beginner, but allows the flexibility for the nerds among us to customize the phone to suit our needs and tastes. CNET and Phonedog have done excellent video reviews on the GS3's user interface and software features and highly recommend that you check them out (Amazon won't allow links to outside sites--so you'll have to google them).

I do have a few software gripes, one of which could effect some peoples' buying decision.
One of the purported advantages of the GS3 over its top competitors from the HTC One line of phones is the fact that the GS3's has a micro SD card slot and accepts up to 64gb cards. Android allows must apps to be saved and launched from the micro SD cards. This feature allows low and mid-range phones to be made with limited internal storage because users can add their own cards.

Sammy, however, wants power users to buy the bigger capacity 32gig phones for an extra $50. To force us to buy the step up model, Samsung disable the ability to move apps from internal storage to the micro SD card. I am not sure of the size of the app partition in the phone, but I hope Sammy didn't put too big of a restriction on internal storage or that could be a problem for some people down the road. I understand why Sammy made the decision to disable the feature, but it seems like a low rent Apple type move to me and, in fairness, the HTC One series doesn't accept SD cards at all (nor does the iPhone nor any of the current Windows 7 phones).

Another small grip I have is with Sammy's decision not to incorporate ICS's native ability to generate folders for apps simply by stacking one app icon on top of another . Motorola incorporated this feature on its ICS update to the Razr and its native to ICS, so why force us to have to press the menu screen, select create folder and than drag and drop files? Sammy, that's very Gingerbread of you. A good UI should use the strengths of the underlying Software and improve on the weakness--not just make changes for change sake. This is one of the few areas that the Sammy's "Nature" UI seems to fall short.

Battery Life

Gripes are over for now. :) The batter life on the GS3 seems pretty decent. I have had it off the charge since 8:30 this morning (its 4:47 in the afternoon), and have been using the phone heavily. Screen on time is about 2:53 minutes. I have done some light web surfing--shopped on ebay and amazon for a new case for the sammy. Send about 7 or 8 emails, 10-12 tests, and made about 80 minutes worth of phone calls. Brightness is set to around 90% (auto-brightness is disabled). I even played about 15 to 20 minutes of GTA III, and watch about 20 minutes of an episode of Lost on Netflix. It's now 6:33 in the evening and the battery says it has 62% remaining. I would still be in the mid-80's with the Razr Maxx and the GNexus would have been dead or on the charger a few hours ago.

I would say the battery is good--but it's not close to being in the same league as the Maxx. The fact that it is removable, however, does give it a major step up on phones like the HTC One (X-S), Razr (original), Sony ION, iPhone 4S and Atrix HD. In short, if you are on Verizon and don't need the Maxx's 2 full days worth of battery life, I would take the GS3 over the Razr Maxx (which is exactly what I did).

Camera

The camera on the GS3 gets top marks. It uses an updated version of the same 8MP Sony sensor used in the iPhone 4S. Unlike the iPhone 4S, there are options galore for tweaking your photos. I am really impressed with the sharpness of the phones, even in low light. Depending on the shot, the camera on the GS3 (and photo quality in general) is very comparable to photo quality on the Nokia 808 and iPhone 4S.

Video quality is on par with the photo quality. It shoots very smooth 1080p video. Color is good and the video quality is genuine HD quality for most shots. If you shooting a sporting events or other fast paced action, or are pan quickly, there is a lag in time while the camera gets in focus. In fairness, I see the same issue with the iPhone 4S and I have yet to see a smart phone camera do better. Audio quality on the camera is also quite good.

Call Quality and Reception

I have had no problems with reception at all. Unlike its GNexus stable mate, the qualcomm radio and baseband in the GS3 are top notch. I have excellent signal strength on Verizon's network. Call quality is excellent. The people I called say that I sound like I am on a landline--and they sound just as clear to me. Data on Verizon's 4G LTE Network is also strong. I located in the metro NY area. I am consistently pulling 18-24mbps download and 9-16mbps upload speeds on the 4G Network. I get strong reception for Wifi and great broadcasting for Bluetooth as well.

Comparison with Competitors

I have no regrets about trading up from the GNexus to the Razr Maxx and even less regret about trading from the Maxx to the GS3. Despite its plastic build, I think the phone does have a premium feel. It's not as solid as the Maxx, but no one is going to look at the pebble blue version of the GS3 and thinks--that thing looks cheap. It's comfortable to hold. The HTC One X has a sharper, brighter screen and a camera that is on par with the GSC's. The lack of a user removable battery is a big knock against the HTC One series however. The iPhone is, well, an iPhone. As nice as the iPhone 4S may be (and it's great phone), the lack of LTE capability and low data rates on Verizon's CDMA network make it a no go for me. On ATT, however, it can take advantage of higher HSPA+ speeds, but ATT's network has been having some issues lately. For that reason alone, if I am married to ATT or am on Sprint or Verizon for that matter, I am taking the GS3 over the iPhone 4S.

Conclusion

This is a solid phone and a no brainer if you are on the market for a phone right now and have $200.00 in your pocket!
Comment Comments (8) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Dec 31, 2013 11:32 AM PST


Samsung Galaxy S3, Blue 16GB (AT&T)
Samsung Galaxy S3, Blue 16GB (AT&T)
11 used & new from $189.00

45 of 52 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Great Phone, but Not Perfect!, July 13, 2012
The GS3's sexy specs and glossy good looks (particularly in pebble blue) won me over. On launch day, I swapped my beloved Droid Razr Maxx, for the Samsung Galaxy S3. Prior to the Maxx, I briefly owned the Verizon version of the GNexus (which I can't recommend at all). Before I get into the nitty gritty details, with pro's, con's and comparisons, at the time of this review, this is the phone you have been waiting for--the phone that will make you use that upgrade or cause you to sign a ridiculous contract with Verizon. After spending ten minutes with the phone, it's an obvious step up from the Razr Maxx and Galaxy Nexus--the former top tier Android phones on Big Red's network.

Performance

As much as I loved my Razr Maxx (and its marathon 2-3 solid days of battery life), after spending a few minutes with the GS3, the performance leap is very noticeable. The GS3 is silky smooth, with no lagginess at all. Apps (particulary heavy duty games like GTA III) launch quickly and are game play is flawless. I know many of you aren't going to play anything requiring more than the occasional fling of a few angry birds, but the GS3's ability to handle hardcore mobile games with ease is a sure fire indicator that it will be able to run 99.9% of the apps out there in two years. In other words, this phone has the chops to allow you to make it through your contract without starting a countdown for your next upgrade.

How about some real world examples of the GS3's muscle? The Qualcomm S4 chipset with an industry leading 2gb of Ram can cut through 1080p video files like butter. Surprisingly, it was able to play back a 23.5 mbps AVCHD file using hardware decoding decoding!!! I was even able to take play back the file with the video in screen, while I did a couple of google searches. The average $400 laptop would have a tough time handling that!

The GS3 doesn't disappoint on the audio side either. While HTC touts its Beats Audio Technology, that's nothing more than a brand name equilizer setting with limited value-- unless you're spend $100 or more on a beats headphones (which I personally don't care for). Sammy, on the other hand, dropped in two Wolfson digital to analog converters, which allows the GS3 to pump out lossless high bit rate music with ease. Using a pair of Etyotic HF3 IEM earphones, sound quality was crisp and clean for music playback. Even lossy tracks streaming from Amazon Cloud sounded surprisingly full. Much more so than on some other phones that I own. In terms of music playback, the GS3 is every bit the equal of the iPhone and possibly a little better.

The Screen

The's GS3's 4.8", 720p HD screen is a stunner! The Super AMOLED panel provides rich color saturation and outstanding contrast. The panel used to make the screen is beautifully fabricated. the slight curve in the design makes it a pleasure to touch. Text is crisp and I see no issue with this most recent implementation of pentile technology. The fuzziness from Galaxy S, GNexus and Fascinate is a thing of the past. Watching videos on the GS3 is a treat.

All is, however, not perfect with the GSIII's screen. While the contrast and color saturation are strong points for the phone, if you like natural color tones, the pumped up saturation levels may bother you. Personally, I would dial back the saturation level if I could. The GS2 had a settings menu that allowed users to tweak brightness, contrast, tint and saturation. For reasons I don't understand, that great feature was some how left behind on this next gen phone, which is a real pity.

While saturation is a matter of taste, the real issue with the screen though is brightness. Even cranked to 100%, the screen still seems to be a few nits behind the curve. I would love to be able to dial up to 120%. The maximum brightness is noticeably less bright than the screen on the Maxx (which Motorola sourced from Sammy). So, what gives? I am not sure, but my best guess is that in the interest of improving battery life and to compensate for the size of the screen (and the power that size screen will suck), Sammy choose to put a software restriction that limits the ability of users to pump of the brightness. Hopefully, this can be cured by a future firmware update.

While the brightness could use a boost, this deficiency is further amplified by awful auto-brightness implementation. When auto-brightness is turned on, the phone makes sudden and drastic adjustments in brightness even in a consistently well lit setting. It seems as if the software has only 3 settings for brightness when it is set to auto--low, medium and high (which isn't that high to begin with). The phone will drop from high to low suddenly, leaving the screen unreadably dark. Until Sammy sends out a software update to fix the problem, I have disabled the auto-brightness feature.

Software Implementation

The user interface for this latest version of touchwiz is really very nice. This phone provides IOS levels of comfort and ease of use to a smartphone beginner, but allows the flexibility for the nerds among us to customize the phone to suit our needs and tastes. CNET and Phonedog have done excellent video reviews on the GS3's user interface and software features and highly recommend that you check them out (Amazon won't allow links to outside sites--so you'll have to google them).

I do have a few software gripes, one of which could effect some peoples' buying decision.
One of the purported advantages of the GS3 over its top competitors from the HTC One line of phones is the fact that the GS3's has a micro SD card slot and accepts up to 64gb cards. Android allows must apps to be saved and launched from the micro SD cards. This feature allows low and mid-range phones to be made with limited internal storage because users can add their own cards.

Sammy, however, wants power users to buy the bigger capacity 32gig phones for an extra $50. To force us to buy the step up model, Samsung disable the ability to move apps from internal storage to the micro SD card. I am not sure of the size of the app partition in the phone, but I hope Sammy didn't put too big of a restriction on internal storage or that could be a problem for some people down the road. I understand why Sammy made the decision to disable the feature, but it seems like a low rent Apple type move to me and, in fairness, the HTC One series doesn't accept SD cards at all (nor does the iPhone nor any of the current Windows 7 phones).

Another small grip I have is with Sammy's decision not to incorporate ICS's native ability to generate folders for apps simply by stacking one app icon on top of another . Motorola incorporated this feature on its ICS update to the Razr and its native to ICS, so why force us to have to press the menu screen, select create folder and than drag and drop files? Sammy, that's very Gingerbread of you. A good UI should use the strengths of the underlying Software and improve on the weakness--not just make changes for change sake. This is one of the few areas that the Sammy's "Nature" UI seems to fall short.

Battery Life

Gripes are over for now. :) The batter life on the GS3 seems pretty decent. I have had it off the charge since 8:30 this morning (its 4:47 in the afternoon), and have been using the phone heavily. Screen on time is about 2:53 minutes. I have done some light web surfing--shopped on ebay and amazon for a new case for the sammy. Send about 7 or 8 emails, 10-12 tests, and made about 80 minutes worth of phone calls. Brightness is set to around 90% (auto-brightness is disabled). I even played about 15 to 20 minutes of GTA III, and watch about 20 minutes of an episode of Lost on Netflix. It's now 6:33 in the evening and the battery says it has 62% remaining. I would still be in the mid-80's with the Razr Maxx and the GNexus would have been dead or on the charger a few hours ago.

I would say the battery is good--but it's not close to being in the same league as the Maxx. The fact that it is removable, however, does give it a major step up on phones like the HTC One (X-S), Razr (original), Sony ION, iPhone 4S and Atrix HD. In short, if you are on Verizon and don't need the Maxx's 2 full days worth of battery life, I would take the GS3 over the Razr Maxx (which is exactly what I did).

Camera

The camera on the GS3 gets top marks. It uses an updated version of the same 8MP Sony sensor used in the iPhone 4S. Unlike the iPhone 4S, there are options galore for tweaking your photos. I am really impressed with the sharpness of the phones, even in low light. Depending on the shot, the camera on the GS3 (and photo quality in general) is very comparable to photo quality on the Nokia 808 and iPhone 4S.

Video quality is on par with the photo quality. It shoots very smooth 1080p video. Color is good and the video quality is genuine HD quality for most shots. If you shooting a sporting events or other fast paced action, or are pan quickly, there is a lag in time while the camera gets in focus. In fairness, I see the same issue with the iPhone 4S and I have yet to see a smart phone camera do better. Audio quality on the camera is also quite good.

Call Quality and Reception

I have had no problems with reception at all. Unlike its GNexus stable mate, the qualcomm radio and baseband in the GS3 are top notch. I have excellent signal strength on Verizon's network. Call quality is excellent. The people I called say that I sound like I am on a landline--and they sound just as clear to me. Data on Verizon's 4G LTE Network is also strong. I located in the metro NY area. I am consistently pulling 18-24mbps download and 9-16mbps upload speeds on the 4G Network. I get strong reception for Wifi and great broadcasting for Bluetooth as well.

Comparison with Competitors

I have no regrets about trading up from the GNexus to the Razr Maxx and even less regret about trading from the Maxx to the GS3. Despite its plastic build, I think the phone does have a premium feel. It's not as solid as the Maxx, but no one is going to look at the pebble blue version of the GS3 and thinks--that thing looks cheap. It's comfortable to hold. The HTC One X has a sharper, brighter screen and a camera that is on par with the GSC's. The lack of a user removable battery is a big knock against the HTC One series however. The iPhone is, well, an iPhone. As nice as the iPhone 4S may be (and it's great phone), the lack of LTE capability and low data rates on Verizon's CDMA network make it a no go for me. On ATT, however, it can take advantage of higher HSPA+ speeds, but ATT's network has been having some issues lately. For that reason alone, if I am married to ATT or am on Sprint or Verizon for that matter, I am taking the GS3 over the iPhone 4S.

Conclusion

This is a solid phone and a no brainer if you are on the market for a phone right now and have $200.00 in your pocket!
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Sep 30, 2012 11:43 AM PDT


Samsung Galaxy S3, Blue 16GB (Verizon Wireless)
Samsung Galaxy S3, Blue 16GB (Verizon Wireless)
Price: $449.00
8 used & new from $165.00

676 of 700 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars I love my GS3, but its not perfect!, July 13, 2012
The GS3's sexy specs and glossy good looks (particularly in pebble blue) won me over. On launch day, I swapped my beloved Droid Razr Maxx, for the Samsung Galaxy S3. Prior to the Maxx, I briefly owned the Verizon version of the GNexus (which I can't recommend at all). Before I get into the nitty gritty details, with pro's, con's and comparisons, at the time of this review, this is the phone you have been waiting for--the phone that will make you use that upgrade or cause you to sign a ridiculous contract with Verizon. After spending ten minutes with the phone, it's an obvious step up from the Razr Maxx and Galaxy Nexus--the former top tier Android phones on Big Red's network.

Performance

As much as I loved my Razr Maxx (and its marathon 2-3 solid days of battery life), after spending a few minutes with the GS3, the performance leap is very noticeable. The GS3 is silky smooth, with no lagginess at all. Apps (particulary heavy duty games like GTA III) launch quickly and are game play is flawless. I know many of you aren't going to play anything requiring more than the occasional fling of a few angry birds, but the GS3's ability to handle hardcore mobile games with ease is a sure fire indicator that it will be able to run 99.9% of the apps out there in two years. In other words, this phone has the chops to allow you to make it through your contract without starting a countdown for your next upgrade.

How about some real world examples of the GS3's muscle? The Qualcomm S4 chipset with an industry leading 2gb of Ram can cut through 1080p video files like butter. Surprisingly, it was able to play back a 23.5 mbps AVCHD file using hardware decoding decoding!!! I was even able to take play back the file with the video in screen, while I did a couple of google searches. The average $400 laptop would have a tough time handling that!

The GS3 doesn't disappoint on the audio side either. While HTC touts its Beats Audio Technology, that's nothing more than a brand name equilizer setting with limited value-- unless you're spend $100 or more on a beats headphones (which I personally don't care for). Sammy, on the other hand, dropped in two Wolfson digital to analog converters, which allows the GS3 to pump out lossless high bit rate music with ease. Using a pair of Etyotic HF3 IEM earphones, sound quality was crisp and clean for music playback. Even lossy tracks streaming from Amazon Cloud sounded surprisingly full. Much more so than on some other phones that I own. In terms of music playback, the GS3 is every bit the equal of the iPhone and possibly a little better.

The Screen

The's GS3's 4.8", 720p HD screen is a stunner! The Super AMOLED panel provides rich color saturation and outstanding contrast. The panel used to make the screen is beautifully fabricated. the slight curve in the design makes it a pleasure to touch. Text is crisp and I see no issue with this most recent implementation of pentile technology. The fuzziness from Galaxy S, GNexus and Fascinate is a thing of the past. Watching videos on the GS3 is a treat.

All is, however, not perfect with the GSIII's screen. While the contrast and color saturation are strong points for the phone, if you like natural color tones, the pumped up saturation levels may bother you. Personally, I would dial back the saturation level if I could. The GS2 had a settings menu that allowed users to tweak brightness, contrast, tint and saturation. For reasons I don't understand, that great feature was some how left behind on this next gen phone, which is a real pity.

While saturation is a matter of taste, the real issue with the screen though is brightness. Even cranked to 100%, the screen still seems to be a few nits behind the curve. I would love to be able to dial up to 120%. The maximum brightness is noticeably less bright than the screen on the Maxx (which Motorola sourced from Sammy). So, what gives? I am not sure, but my best guess is that in the interest of improving battery life and to compensate for the size of the screen (and the power that size screen will suck), Sammy choose to put a software restriction that limits the ability of users to pump of the brightness. Hopefully, this can be cured by a future firmware update.

While the brightness could use a boost, this deficiency is further amplified by awful auto-brightness implementation. When auto-brightness is turned on, the phone makes sudden and drastic adjustments in brightness even in a consistently well lit setting. It seems as if the software has only 3 settings for brightness when it is set to auto--low, medium and high (which isn't that high to begin with). The phone will drop from high to low suddenly, leaving the screen unreadably dark. Until Sammy sends out a software update to fix the problem, I have disabled the auto-brightness feature.

Software Implementation

The user interface for this latest version of touchwiz is really very nice. This phone provides IOS levels of comfort and ease of use to a smartphone beginner, but allows the flexibility for the nerds among us to customize the phone to suit our needs and tastes. CNET and Phonedog have done excellent video reviews on the GS3's user interface and software features and highly recommend that you check them out (Amazon won't allow links to outside sites--so you'll have to google them).

I do have a few software gripes, one of which could effect some peoples' buying decision.
One of the purported advantages of the GS3 over its top competitors from the HTC One line of phones is the fact that the GS3's has a micro SD card slot and accepts up to 64gb cards. Android allows must apps to be saved and launched from the micro SD cards. This feature allows low and mid-range phones to be made with limited internal storage because users can add their own cards.

Sammy, however, wants power users to buy the bigger capacity 32gig phones for an extra $50. To force us to buy the step up model, Samsung disable the ability to move apps from internal storage to the micro SD card. I am not sure of the size of the app partition in the phone, but I hope Sammy didn't put too big of a restriction on internal storage or that could be a problem for some people down the road. I understand why Sammy made the decision to disable the feature, but it seems like a low rent Apple type move to me and, in fairness, the HTC One series doesn't accept SD cards at all (nor does the iPhone nor any of the current Windows 7 phones).

Another small grip I have is with Sammy's decision not to incorporate ICS's native ability to generate folders for apps simply by stacking one app icon on top of another . Motorola incorporated this feature on its ICS update to the Razr and its native to ICS, so why force us to have to press the menu screen, select create folder and than drag and drop files? Sammy, that's very Gingerbread of you. A good UI should use the strengths of the underlying Software and improve on the weakness--not just make changes for change sake. This is one of the few areas that the Sammy's "Nature" UI seems to fall short.

Battery Life

Gripes are over for now. :) The batter life on the GS3 seems pretty decent. I have had it off the charge since 8:30 this morning (its 4:47 in the afternoon), and have been using the phone heavily. Screen on time is about 2:53 minutes. I have done some light web surfing--shopped on ebay and amazon for a new case for the sammy. Send about 7 or 8 emails, 10-12 tests, and made about 80 minutes worth of phone calls. Brightness is set to around 90% (auto-brightness is disabled). I even played about 15 to 20 minutes of GTA III, and watch about 20 minutes of an episode of Lost on Netflix. It's now 6:33 in the evening and the battery says it has 62% remaining. I would still be in the mid-80's with the Razr Maxx and the GNexus would have been dead or on the charger a few hours ago.

I would say the battery is good--but it's not close to being in the same league as the Maxx. The fact that it is removable, however, does give it a major step up on phones like the HTC One (X-S), Razr (original), Sony ION, iPhone 4S and Atrix HD. In short, if you are on Verizon and don't need the Maxx's 2 full days worth of battery life, I would take the GS3 over the Razr Maxx (which is exactly what I did). [Edited 7/26/12: I ordered two 2300mah batteries with a wall charge from QCell for $24.00 from Amazon last week. These batteries performed as good or better than OEM and had NFC capabilities. This eliminated the need for a huge internal battery from my perspective, although there are plenty of 3500 and 4000mah extended batteries available for the GS3. If you're coming from anything other than a flip phone or Razr Maxx, you will have no complaints about the battery life--This phone absolutely smokes my old iPhone 4 in terms of battery life).

Camera

The camera on the GS3 gets top marks. It uses an updated version of the same 8MP Sony sensor used in the iPhone 4S. Unlike the iPhone 4S, there are options galore for tweaking your photos. I am really impressed with the sharpness of the phones, even in low light. Depending on the shot, the camera on the GS3 (and photo quality in general) is very comparable to photo quality on the Nokia 808 and iPhone 4S.

Video quality is on par with the photo quality. It shoots very smooth 1080p video. Color is good and the video quality is genuine HD quality for most shots. If you shooting a sporting events or other fast paced action, or are pan quickly, there is a lag in time while the camera gets in focus. In fairness, I see the same issue with the iPhone 4S and I have yet to see a smart phone camera do better. Audio quality on the camera is also quite good.

Call Quality and Reception

I have had no problems with reception at all. Unlike its GNexus stable mate, the qualcomm radio and baseband in the GS3 are top notch. I have excellent signal strength on Verizon's network. Call quality is excellent. The people I called say that I sound like I am on a landline--and they sound just as clear to me. Data on Verizon's 4G LTE Network is also strong. I located in the metro NY area. I am consistently pulling 18-24mbps download and 9-16mbps upload speeds on the 4G Network. I get strong reception for Wifi and great broadcasting for Bluetooth as well.

Comparison with Competitors

I have no regrets about trading up from the GNexus to the Razr Maxx and even less regret about trading from the Maxx to the GS3. Despite its plastic build, I think the phone does have a premium feel. It's not as solid as the Maxx, but no one is going to look at the pebble blue version of the GS3 and thinks--that thing looks cheap. It's comfortable to hold. The HTC One X has a sharper, brighter screen and a camera that is on par with the GSC's. The lack of a user removable battery is a big knock against the HTC One series however. The iPhone is, well, an iPhone. As nice as the iPhone 4S may be (and it's great phone), the lack of LTE capability and low data rates on Verizon's CDMA network make it a no go for me. On ATT, however, it can take advantage of higher HSPA+ speeds, but ATT's network has been having some issues lately. For that reason alone, if I am married to ATT or am on Sprint or Verizon for that matter, I am taking the GS3 over the iPhone 4S.

Conclusion

This is a solid phone and a no brainer if you are on the market for a phone right now and have $200.00 in your pocket!
Comment Comments (11) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Jan 7, 2013 10:13 AM PST


Blue Cushion Sapphire Loose Unset Gemstone 8mm (Qty=1)
Blue Cushion Sapphire Loose Unset Gemstone 8mm (Qty=1)

5.0 out of 5 stars Beautiful Stone, July 12, 2012
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
Although this is a lab created sapphire, just as with natural gems, the lab created variety are also graded and sorted based on quality. This particular stone happens to be a very fine quality lab created sapphire. While most lab stones have good uniformity in color and the blue is a really nice medium shade---I would say somewhere between cornflower and ceylon (leaning closer to cornflower). It really is a lovely shade. The this stone is translucent and has lots of fire! The quality of the cut is really quite decent for a lab stone. I don't know what method was used, but the there are no visible grooves in the stone surface and the stone is very well polished. The stone near perfect symmetry is the only tell tale sign to me that this is a synthetic just going by the naked eye, but that's not a bad thing. Even under 10x magnification, I had a hard time finding gas bubble inclusions, which is common for most synthetics (and a tell time sign of origin). I don't suggest that you try to pass this stone off as the real mccoy. IMHO, any gemologist would be able to spot it as synthetic, but I think this stone is good enough to fool a good chunk of the bench jewelers out there. :) Excellent choice for a low cost option as a replacement stone or as a stop gap in a engagement setting until you save up for the real thing. :)

I bought this stone to replace an aquamarine that fractured in its setting. For a daily driver ring that is going to need to take a beating and continue to look fabulous, this is one of the best low cost options out there.


Kindle Fire (1st Generation)
Kindle Fire (1st Generation)
274 used & new from $44.99

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Great value, but some improvements needed, June 11, 2012
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
I am a technogeek, that guy that waited that pre-ordered the first gen iPad and google Nexus One. I am not a fanboy of any one manufacturer's produce and like to sample different wares. When a refurbished Kindle Fire refurb was offered for $139.00, I couldn't help but make an impulse purchase. Although the Kindle Fire does not have state of the art specs, it does offer superb integration with the Amazon ecosystem that is unavailable on any other android tablet (or phone for that matter). While other tablets have access to the Kindle reading and mp3 apps, none can access Amazon's video streaming apps (including 1000's of free streaming videos for Prime members). That's a major selling point!! In fact, there is no other equivalent service online that will allow you to download or stream the most recent episodes of your favorite tv shows like Mad Men or Breaking Bad. IOS has this with iTunes, but no one else besides Amazon is currently able to offer this kind of access. For me, this is a huge distinguishing factor that makes the Fire a standout product.

As the number 1 selling android-based tablet, third-party developers have invested effort and time designing optimized versions of their apps to run on the Fire. Although one of the initial concerns for many at launch time was the lack of access to the Google Play marketplace, in some respects the App store for Amazon has more of the top games available for easy download. For example, if you want to download Call of Duty 3 or N.O.V.A. 3 for android, you typically have to go to Gameloft's website and download from there. With the Fire, the apps are available to purchase through the App Store itself. Nice!

As others have written, set up is easy enough that I think even my techno-phobe mother could figure it out. The only thing you have to do is select your router and you're good to go. I do recommend downloading a third party email client though as the native client leaves a lot to be desired.

Areas for Improvement

Although I am really impressed with the Fire, it is a first generation device and there are aspects that could stand some improvement. While the video playback is smooth, video quality is very much SD. Video feeds could take far greater advantage of the 1026x600 res screen than they do and the TI OMAP 4360 chipset could certainly handle a 720p stream without issue (I have the same chip in my Razr Maxx and it can stream 1080p without a problem!). So, I can't really understand why the video feed seems to be capped at standard definition (480) lines of resolution. I was hoping this would be rectified by a fw upgrade, but apparently that's not in the offing. In any cause, video quality doesn't look particular sharp on the screen and there's no reason it couldn't look much better if Amazon allowed the Kindle to take advantage of the hardware power. My only guess is that the 512mb of RAM may cause some video to drop frames and stutter, so they decided that the SD playback was a reasonable compromise. They might be right for most people, but it's a major let down for me.

The onscreen settings menus can also stand some improvement. It shnould not require multiple touches to reach a basic function like volume--particularly when most devices have hardware buttons (like the Nook Tablet). There should be a shortcut to faster/easier access to critical settings like volume and screen brightness that would make it a one or two step process at most, rather than the present three steps. Hopefully this can be cleaned up in the future.

The notification features also fail to take advantage of gingerbread's native notification bar. While a notice will flash for a couple of seconds in the upper left hand corner, it then disappears until you touch the notification corner. This is a major step backwards, making a naturally terrific notification system (an android strong suit) into a weakness (similar to IOS).

When the Fire debuted nine months ago, it was really a game changer. The android competition has caught up with the likes of the Samsung Galaxy Tab 2 and the soon to be released Google Nexus Tablet--both sporting better designs and, with respect to the rumored Google Nexus Tablet (to be released in the next 30 days), superior hardware (Nvidia Tegra-3 quad-core, 1gig of ram, 16gb of internal storage, support for up to 64gb microSD card, 1280x720 screen etc, for a list price of $200.00. While the specs for the Galaxy Tab 7 2 and Google Nexus Tablet, in particular, may blow away the Kindle Fire, those devices will likely be more attractive to a gadget hound like me. For the average consumer, however, the Kindle Fire offers a solid user experience and access to media that trumps every other device except for the iPad. It's easy to recommend a Kindle Fire as a gift for friends and family. In short, the Fire easily does 85% of everything the iPad 2 can do at a fraction of the cost.
Comment Comments (4) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Jun 11, 2012 2:30 PM PDT


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