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Apley's System of Orthopaedics and Fractures, Ninth edition ISE
Apley's System of Orthopaedics and Fractures, Ninth edition ISE
by Louis Solomon
Edition: Hardcover
Price: $164.95
37 used & new from $71.23

7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Time for a real review, November 23, 2011
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
I was extremely disappointed with this title. I try and research the books that I read carefully, and the general positive feedback for this book did not live up to the gossip. Largely speaking, this is a dated text from a legend in the field of orthopaedics. However, given the most recent books being published, this book is way out of its league.
The book is divided into three sections: general orthopaedics, regional orthopaedics, and fractures and joint injuries. Although each chapter and section follows a similar style of authorship, the depth of information is extremely varied. One chapter may be just skimming the surface where another is pointing out things is grotesque detail. Another huge fall of each chapter is the dated text that is geared to an international audience. In almost every section of regional orthopaedics, it speaks about the catastrophic nature of tuberculosis. After reading this book, one might think that at the very core of orthopaedics is the treatment of tuberculosis. In reality, how often is this seen? Rarely!
The first section is tragically disappointing in that its primary focus is general information that is learned in medical school. It is really information that a primary care physician would need. Forgive me, but I just don't see how reading about medical management of rheumatoid arthritis is going to help me with orthopaedic surgery. Even still, if I was a primary care physician, this is definitely not the source that I would pick up, which should be for orthopaedic surgeons.
The next section, regional orthopaedics, is the golden egg of the book. In rather simplistic detail, it explains physical exam maneuvers, orthopaedic conditions and basic treatments. It is helpful for a beginner. The down side is just that; it's for a beginner. Details for each condition are scanty and incomplete. The information in this text certainly isn't updated enough and doesn't cover surgical interventions in the depth that you would expect if this text were for an orthopaedic surgeon. There is very little information on surgical technique. I would feel very uncomfortable treating my patients or even recommending surgery if this book were my primary source.
The final section, fractures and joint injuries, isn't the worst thing in the world. It is, however, plagued by overly wordy and boring sections on ATLS and how the emergency medical system runs in the UK. The sad thing is that pocket books, like handbook of fractures, give more information on fracture classification and treatment than this big book can deliver in 300 pages on fractures. It's sad and very wordy!
Final thoughts: Don't listen to the critics that exclaim this book is a must have for orthopaedic surgeons or that it will help you do well on your exam. Trust me, I have taken the OITE, this book didn't own up. Even for a general or beginner text, I would probably recommend the clinical diagnosis and treatment book on orthopaedics before this one. It is more concise and better written. If your about to take your first leap into orthopaedics, don't pick this one. If your an advanced learner, there is nothing more to learn here. It's an expensive, dated text that from a legendary orthopaedist. Perhaps the book remains in print just to keep his memory alive.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Jan 21, 2013 4:52 AM PST


First Aid for the USMLE Step 1: 2008 (First Aid USMLE)
First Aid for the USMLE Step 1: 2008 (First Aid USMLE)
by Vikas Bhushan
Edition: Paperback
84 used & new from $0.01

5.0 out of 5 stars Dead On!, November 30, 2010
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This book has enough good ratings that I will keep mine short and to the point. It was exactly what I needed to know for usmle step 1. No questions that you should use this book to its full extent before taking step 1. Enough said!


Handbook of Fractures
Handbook of Fractures
by Kenneth Egol MD
Edition: Paperback
Price: $78.11
41 used & new from $52.34

5.0 out of 5 stars Pocket book phhhh...more like primary source!, November 30, 2010
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Handbook of Fractures (Paperback)
I wanted to sing the praises of this book even though I haven't finished reading the entire thing yet. At the level of a 4th year medical student, this book is very understandable. It provides quick bits of information on almost all types of fractures and even includes a couple chapters that have very relevant bits of information, like a chapter on pain management. It really comes in most handy while on the trauma services, and I generally see most of the new interns carrying it around in their pocket. I have very frequently referenced its pages when trying to figure out how to fix a fracture, and its bullet point style makes it very easy to check specific points. Memorizing one chapter on a specific type of fracture will make you competent enough to know how to manage a fracture. Senior residents may find this book to be too simple, but for the beginner to orthopaedics, this is a valuable pocket manual that really is used more like a primary source. I highly recommend this book if you are going to rotate on a trauma service and want to impress someone.


Essentials of Orthopedic Surgery
Essentials of Orthopedic Surgery
by Sam W. Wiesel
Edition: Paperback
31 used & new from $27.00

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Generic Info, November 30, 2010
I originally got this book because of my interest in orthopaedics and because a senior classmate recommended it for its simplicity. In that respect, I agree with him in that it is rather simple in its approach. In the end, however, even though this book is well written, I really didn't like it. For starters, I wanted to read a book that would give me useful knowledge for orthopaedic rotations that I was about to take, but this book failed miserably. The first several chapters rehash basic science stuff about osteoclasts and osteoblasts, and though it is useful knowledge, it is not very clinically relevant. While the basic science chapters in the beginning didn't have much clinical relevance, I had high hopes for later chapters. Unfortunately, I was only let down. Clinical chapters were so simplistic and vague that it really didn't help me manage a patient or answer relevant questions on my rotation. Rather, the information was generic and would have been covered by just doing a rotation and watching what was happening. For example, while reading about joint replacements, the book goes on to explain porous and cemented joints. While this info is good, the book doesn't give enough information to allow one to make a good decision on which joint would be better, rather, it seeks to just tell you that the two joint classes exist. I picked up on this information in less than one week of just doing a rotation, and I really didn't need to spend time reading this book to figure that out. This kind of information is rather abundant throughout the book. Also, don't expect this book to teach a physical exam, or you are going to be disappointed. If you are looking for a broad overview of orthopaedics, then this book is well suited for your tastes, but if you want to impress an attending on an orthopaedic rotation, best look elsewhere.


Crush Step 2: The Ultimate USMLE Step 2 Review, 3e
Crush Step 2: The Ultimate USMLE Step 2 Review, 3e
by Adam Brochert
Edition: Paperback
112 used & new from $0.01

4.0 out of 5 stars Simple, Simple, Simple...Simon, November 17, 2010
This is a really simple book, which becomes its weakness and its strength. The book will cover very high-yield items in a narrative format. It is easy to read and simple in its approach. However, topics are covered in a matter of pages that are obviously not comprehensive enough to get all high-yield step 2 info, and not everything on step 2 is simple. USMLE step 2 is a different animal than step 1, and it is my opinion that memorizing high-yield info will not cut it! It is a thought provoking test, and this book doesn't really help master the thought process. Don't get me wrong, if you don't know the stuff in this book, you should read it! However, I found that I knew almost all of it even before I picked it up. It was just too simple for me, and I imagine others had the same thoughts. The author of the book has supposedly scored off the charts on step 2, but don't expect this book to do the same if it is all you use. Because the USMLE step 2 secrets book covers very similar information and is given in more of a question and answer format, I would recommend it over this one. Overall, great book with high-yield stuff, but don't be surprised if you know a lot of it already and feel less challenged.


Basics of Anesthesia: with Evolve Website, 5e (Stoelting, Basics of Anesthesia: with Evolve Website)
Basics of Anesthesia: with Evolve Website, 5e (Stoelting, Basics of Anesthesia: with Evolve Website)
by Robert K. Stoelting
Edition: Hardcover
38 used & new from $21.46

4 of 6 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars MY TURN..., November 17, 2010
I read through almost all of this book while on an anesthesiology rotation during 4th year of medical school. I quickly came to find out that most people headed into anesthesiology at my institution had read the book cover to cover several times, and they all seem to think that it is a fair resource, though not great. My line of thought tends to be along those lines. The good things about this book are that it is incredibly simplistic. Any 3rd or 4th year medical student should have no problem taking in the information in this book, and that goes without question for interns as well. The text is very friendly and quickly readable; however, the flip side to this is that it lacks impressionability. Though certain principles are explained at a preschool level, they aren't sounded out with enough emphasis to help a young anesthesiologist make difficult decisions. I was frequently getting to the end of a chapter and wondering what in the world I had just read. There are tables and charts that help drive home concepts and do a good job of summarizing textual information, but if I was a young anesthesiologist, I would still feel uneasy using this book as a primary source or a reference. The other qualm I have in regards to the text is that is extremely redundant. For example, the cardiology section goes over each type of pathology and how anesthesia should be optimized for each condition, but the recommendations are nearly identical for all of the conditions. In other words, you continually read the exact same thing over and over again for pages. They could have summarized the entire chapter by doing a bullet point saying, "Ensure hemodynamic stability of patients with cardiac disease." I became additionally frustrated with the books attempt to explain pathology. Rather than just talk about the anesthesiology related to a condition, the book rambled on giving descriptions of pathological conditions which most of its audience already know about in much greater detail than what is explained. In the end, I cannot say that this book didn't enhance my knowledge of anesthesiology. In fact, it was well equipped for what I wanted to get from the experience as an individual not interested in going into the field. This leads me to think that this book is an excellent primer that can easily help a beginner wrap up the basic ideas of anesthesia, but mastering anesthesiology seems to be an entirely different matter indeed.


Netter's Concise Orthopaedic Anatomy, 2e (Netter Basic Science)
Netter's Concise Orthopaedic Anatomy, 2e (Netter Basic Science)
by Jon C. Thompson
Edition: Paperback
Price: $55.95
84 used & new from $45.67

7 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Them are some impressive bones..., November 17, 2010
Like most people, I picked this one up during the 4th year of medical school to help me with orthopaedic rotations. After using netter's atlas extensively during the 1st year of medical school, I was a little concerned that the book would be filled with too many points that didn't relate to orthopaedics, even with the word "concise" in its title. I was pleasantly surprised, however, to find that the information in this book had very little superfluous information. In additional to pointing out relevant anatomy, the book did a fantastic job giving tid-bits of information about various orthopaedic conditions that are commonly encountered. Don't get me wrong, you would by no means be an expert on a topic after glancing at the clinical cliff notes of this book, but you at least understand the pathology and treatment behind certain conditions. Another helpful aspect of this book included tables that very clearly spelled out different muscles and their innervations. This came in handy when I was on hand surgical rotations, and several faculty commented that my knowledge of upper extremity anatomy was impressive. The only downside to this book is that it doesn't orient the reader to different surgical approaches. It makes a weak attempt, but many times I found myself guessing on what I was looking at on the surgical field. If you want your anatomy to apply to exactly what the surgeon views, I would recommend Hoppenfields surgical exposure book, which is an excellent companion to this one. Together, they make a great combination that can be used to learn orthopaedic anatomy. As a side note, I cannot say that this book would be a good choice for a beginning medical student. It really is geared toward teaching orthopaedic anatomy alone, and a medical student would miss out on a tremendous amount of anatomy by using this book as their atlas. Better pick another atlas unless you are using this one for its given purpose-to study orthopaedics.


Case Files Family Medicine, Second Edition (LANGE Case Files)
Case Files Family Medicine, Second Edition (LANGE Case Files)
by Eugene Toy
Edition: Paperback
41 used & new from $7.03

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Happy with a good source., November 10, 2010
If hindsight is 20/20 and I had to do it again, this book is definitely a keeper. Studying for the family medicine shelf exam is a lot like studying for step 2, and in my experience, I found myself relying on step 2 review material and question banks more than I did on books geared towards family medicine. Though the topics for the family medicine shelf are broad in nature, I was pleasantly surprised with the scope of material that this book covered. It really gave key hitters for things that were seen in the clinic and things that were tested on the shelf exam. However, don't expect it to cover the entire shelf exam. If you want to do well, then I recommend supplementing this book with other review materials for step 2. In my case, I started with case files to cover the basics and then moved on to usmleworld's internal medicine questions. My shelf score came out tip top!


Boards and Wards (Boards and Wards Series)
Boards and Wards (Boards and Wards Series)
by Brad Spellberg
Edition: Paperback
48 used & new from $3.07

6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars NOT BAD BUT NOT PERFECT, November 10, 2010
Let's start with the good. The book is an excellent for keeping in your pocket while around the hospital and looking things up quickly. Its writing style, mostly in bullet points, is relatively friendly, and allows for a quick reference on a good number of topics. It is very concise, and in my opinion it contains less errors than other similar step 2 review books like First Aid step 2. I was particularly happy with pictures, especially on the cardiology section showing EKG's. Now let's talk about the bad. Its brevity really keeps it from covering all of the topics that you might want to review for step 2, and it is frequently not detailed enough to cover any one particular topic. It often misses topics completely, which really prevent it from being a thorough review of step 2 material. I do not recommend this as a good source for internal medicine. Its doesn't cover enough material for the internal medicine shelf exam. Additionally, the sections of the book make it difficult to study one topic at a time. For example, the section called "outpatient medicine" covers material that should have been covered in other sections, like derm or cardiology. This ultimately makes it difficutl to study each topic without skimming other chapters to see if you have missed out on other information. In my own experience, I read through the cardiology section to brush up and was frustrated to find other cardiac information in different sections that was not covered in the cardiology section. All in all, this is a good resource, and it is easy to learn from; however, don't be surprised if you can't answer specifics about a disease, like hidradenitis suppurative, if this is your only source.


First Aid for the® Medicine Clerkship: Second Edition (First Aid Series)
First Aid for the® Medicine Clerkship: Second Edition (First Aid Series)
by Latha G. Stead
Edition: Paperback
64 used & new from $0.01

3.0 out of 5 stars What a sinking dissappointment., November 10, 2010
Ugh, I have been very frustrated with the lack of good FA books. They were superior for step 1 and psychiatry, but other renditions are just feeding off the good name. I am afraid that this book is one of the parasites the plague the series and keeps it from being top notch. I have to agree that there are multiple errors in the book. Not just minor errors, but major problems. For example, MUDPILES is commonly used to denote conditions that cause increased anion gap metabolic acidosis. The "E" stands for ethylene glycol, antifreeze, but this book indicated that it is ethanol. This is a glaring error. Unfortunately these mishaps here and there make this book somewhat of a disaster. I commonly found myself wondering if the book was accurate enough to trust. I also had a hard time translating the dry bullet points into something of clinical relevance, and key points on the side margins just didn't fill the gap of clinical relevancy enough for me. That is not to say that it is all bad. Its bullet point style cuts the length of the book down to a reasonable length. It is long enough to cover most all of the topics that you will find on the shelf exam. Overall, I would be wary of this book. I found the step up to internal medicine, though lengthy, to be a much better source.
Comment Comments (2) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Jan 9, 2011 11:51 AM PST


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