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Kyjen PP01043 Squeakin' Animals Hide-A-Bird Replacement Dog Toys Squeak Toys 3-Pack, Large, Multicolor
Kyjen PP01043 Squeakin' Animals Hide-A-Bird Replacement Dog Toys Squeak Toys 3-Pack, Large, Multicolor
Price: $4.99
25 used & new from $4.81

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great replacement toy for plush puzzles., September 12, 2014
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
I got this as a replacement for my dog's plush puzzles. She loves to rip toys that are hidden inside other toys like the Kyjen Playtus or Squirrel toy. These birds fit great inside of her various plush puzzles (she has a chicken house and a platypus).

My dog loves them. They're great for indoor play (she sometimes tosses them around and plays catch by herself).

Other reviewers have commented on the durability of these toys. While we've only had these for a few weeks, they've held up fine but my dog isn't too much of chewer. She's mostly interested in tossing them and pulling them out of their hiding places. For those purposes I don't really see any danger coming out of it but if your dog is much rougher you might want to be careful due to its size and durability (but I think this goes for any stuffed toy in this price range).


Monopoly Deal Card Game with Exclusive Robot Token Included
Monopoly Deal Card Game with Exclusive Robot Token Included
Offered by starworldtoys
Price: $10.50
14 used & new from $9.99

5.0 out of 5 stars One of our favorites - back in a reprint!, September 12, 2014
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
My husband and I came across this game several years ago and its one of our favorites - definitely the best out of all the card games based on board games like Scrabble Slam or Yahtzee Hands Down - honestly one of our all-time favorites. We lost a few cards out of original deck (red backing) and I'm so happy that this game came back in a reprint (the set I got included the robot token and the card backs are green).

The game definitely has the predatory Monopoly board game feel to it but instead of running for hours and permanently damaging feelings and relationships, games are usually over in 20 minutes leaving players wanting more. The object of the game is to collect 3 complete sets of properties. (When just the two of us, my husband and I might play to 5). Other players can demand money from you in the form of birthday presents, rent, etc and if not careful these payments may have to come out of your property collection if you run out of money in your 'bank'. Players can also steal your property but if you have a 'Just Say No' card you can cancel other players' demands. This game is pretty light on strategy - basically a lot of decisions are based on timing - but we still find the game oddly addicting.

Easy to teach others. Great game for multiple players but also plays well with only two players. Great travel game and light gaming fun for those nights you don't really want to pull out anything too cerebral. It's nice go between for us when we don't want to play anything so random as Fluxx but don't want to get involved in something more involved like Risk, Ticket to Ride or Battle Line.

The robot token was a nice touch (probably would have prefered a plastic storage case as a bonus instead) but we hardly ever play the board game version of Monopoly.


Gloom
Gloom
Price: $23.08
17 used & new from $19.56

4.0 out of 5 stars Great for adult party settings, September 12, 2014
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Gloom (Toy)
I picked up Gloom expecting an engrossing and replayable experience. My husband and enjoy gaming together (board, card and video games) However, we're both coming short on time at the end of the workday so longer delves into our favorite video games or board games aren't always an option.

Gloom was not what I was expected. While it is unique in its theme, story-telling aspect aesthetic (great artwork and see-through cards!). I feel that it is lacking in its actual gameplay.

Basically, you must make the characters of your chosen family endure the most miserable life possible while perhaps helping your opponents' family members see the brighter sides of life. You play the cards that deal points to each character with the purpose of getting the most negative values as possible while covering up your opponents points with positive points. I didn't really feel that there was much strategy or decision-making involved in the gameplay as action cards add a high level randomity to game.

The storytelling aspect of the game is enjoyable. We have an appreciation for dark humor so filling in the events between two cards can be a sick delight to some. For others, it might be a turn-off so it's important to know your audience, Relatedly, some of the cards have heavy text which was a bit of a turn off for me as the it required so much verbal brainwork for little strategic payoff.

For the right kind of gaming group, this game can be a hit but I think it's important to know your audience. My husband and I mainly game together and occasionally with some friends. We played the game a few times and while we enjoyed it, but we didn't really see much playtime in the future with the game so it has been passed on to other gamers. I can imagine this game being a bigger hit in an adult party setting with the right kind of personalities in the room. Otherwise, the experience really isn't that rich based on the game alone.


Battle Line
Battle Line

5.0 out of 5 stars Strong strategy and deduction packed into a small 2-player game, September 12, 2014
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Battle Line (Toy)
My husband and I both enjoy games: video games, card games, board games and we're on the hunt for games with an easy set-up, short game time but still with an engrossing experience. We enjoy games like Risk and Ticket to Ride but have been finding that we lack the time to put in daily gaming time with the set-up or playtime required with these types of board games. Luckily, Battle Line fits a lot of our requirements: short, easy to set-up and very engrossing.

Battle Line is a blends some poker and rummy with capture the flag. You need need to create formations on one side of the flag that will overpower your opponents formation on the other. Claim three adjacent or five total flags, and you win. The rules are simple and easy to learn. Tactic cards are available and can throw an unexpected spin a turn but I find that they aren't necessary to win but nor do they ruin the overall experience.

The game can move rather quickly though there are moments of analysis paralysis when a player agonizes over the decision of when and where to place a troop card and if you're opponent has a clue on what your strategy is and is purposely withholding information from you.

I wasn't totally sold on the theme at first, but it fits pretty well (you feel like a general assigning incoming troops to different parts of a battlefield), If ancient battallion formations do not interest you, the theme can be ignored and we typically use usual vocabulary like "straight flush" rather than a "Wedge". The game, at 70 cards and 9 red pawn markers travels pretty well. We sleeved our set and store them in an Ultra Pro Deck Box (probably not necessary for most). The pawn markers stay home and we usually use coins, bits of paper or even sugar packets as flags when we play at cafes or restaurants.

Highly recommended for two-player gamers!


100 Most Beautiful Songs Ever: for Fingerpicking Guitar
100 Most Beautiful Songs Ever: for Fingerpicking Guitar
by Hal Leonard Corp.
Edition: Paperback
Price: $17.92
24 used & new from $13.85

22 of 22 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Great for beginners, March 31, 2014
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
Length:: 1:18 Mins

I've been self-teaching my guitar for a few years now. I initially started off with Fingerpicking songbooks from Hal Leonard. This thick volume is very similar to those books. If you are a beginner to fingerstyle guitar, this volume may be a useful practice tool. I was a big fan of these types of songbooks when I was new to guitar and especially fingerstyle solo guitar.

However, now that I'm a bit more skilled, the series is not challenging enough for me. The arrangements are mostly single notes arpeggios with an occasional thumb-picked baseline here and there. Arrangements are mostly limited to the first five frets with a focus on the first three frets. The songs are recognizable but very simplistic. For a beginner, it is great to be able to play more contemporary tunes. However, as you progress these arrangements quickly grow repetitive and tiresome. If you're a beginner interested in fingerpicking guitar and don't already have some of the Hal Leonard Fingerpicking song books (i.e Fingerpicking Acoustic Rock - Guitar Solo, Fingerpicking Pop: 15 Songs Arranged for Solo Guitar in Standard Notation & Tab), this volume has quite a selection of songs to keep you entertained for a while. I had many of the Hal Leanoard Fingerpicking books and a lot of the songs in that series are replicated in this volume. (You can check the Hal Leonard website for the complete songlist)

If you've feel you moved beyond simple fingerstyle patterns and have your sights at more complicated fingerstyle arrangements like Sungha Jung, Chet Atkins or Tommy Emmanuel OR you are looking for companion fingerstyle guitar I'd probably skip this.
Comment Comments (3) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Apr 13, 2014 3:46 PM PDT


Rocksmith [Download]
Rocksmith [Download]
Price: $17.99

3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great game and learning tool!, June 21, 2013
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
I purchased Rocksmith for the XBOX 360. Having the real tone cable, I decided to pick up the PC version as well to be able to play Rocksmith if I'm on the road or to not take up the TV (what also helped me decision was that the PC version was less than $10 when I bought it). I will review the Rocksmith game as well as compare my experience with the XBOX console version and the PC version. FYI, this download requires a Steam account. It took about an hour to download on my connection. No huge issues for me during download or installation.

Rocksmith is a pretty awesome tool for guitarists of all levels. I consider myself an intermediate guitarist. I am self-taught and mostly play acoustic/fingerstyle guitar. I caught Rocksmith on sale and decided to pick up an electric guitar to give it a shot. So far, I am not disappointed. The games main premise is to teach you songs. Learn the songs on a real guitar, score high enough and you unlock rewards and even more songs.

PROS:
+Rocksmith magically adjusts to match your skill level. It catches on pretty quickly to how many notes or chords you can handle. You never have to worry about never getting to the end of the song because Rocksmith constantly adjusts the song difficulty.

+Different rehearsal modes help master songs. I really enjoy the riff repeater feature. It takes a section of the song and you can either play the section slowly, gradually picking up speed each time you complete the section perfectly. My favorite is the Leveler mode. Each time you complete the section, it adds on more notes until you reach 100% mastery. If you feel that rehearsal mode doesn't give you enough credit in attempting more complexity you can manually adjust the settings in riff repeater.

+Song selection is varied. While i'm not familiar with a lot of the songs, it was a great way to get to know other genres of music and gain appreciation for them. I think for added variety they can add some jazz and blues types of songs.

+Virtual amp & cable: You only get one tone until you start unlocking custom tones and other gears. The virtual amp is pretty awesome and is one of the biggest reasons I invested in Rocksmith. I didn't want to invest in an amp, and for a beginner, I think what Rocksmith has to offer is more than adequate. Once you start unlocking gear, you can mess around and create your own tones. Score high enough on songs and you get that song tones as well.

This edition does not come with the cable but can be purchased seperately. The cable is cross-platform so I can use it on both the XBOX and on the PC.

TO BE IMPROVED - I found the game really innovative and interesting that it's difficult to really find anything that I absolutely didn't like. Here are a few points that could be improved upon, though.

-Rhythm/Strumming - There is zero instruction on rhythm and strumming patterns. Beginning guitarists will have to go elsewhere to learn how to create appropriate strumming patterns. For strumming sections, you can get away with all downstrokes.

-Finger placement - I think that Rocksmith could have easily added an option to display suggest finger placement on the fretboard. It already shows you, quite uselessly with fingerprints, that you should move your finger from one fret to another. However, it doesn't suggest which ones.

-Guitarcade - Guitarcade is a bit of a letdown. Some of the games can be useful tools such as Ducks/Superducks which lets you practice finding the right note on the fretboard. however, for many of the games, they are just that, games. I think there could have been more added value with a bit more focus on learning or another mode that was focused on learning scales/chords rather than playing (yes, I know it's a game).

-Audio latency - This was a bigger problem on the XBOX than on my PC. There is still a slight delay in the PC version on my computer but nothing to the point of the game being unplayable. I'm sure that performance varies from computer to computer.

-Visual display - The Rocksmith display is innovative but as someone with a bit of experience reading music and tablature, it was confusing. Standard tab is read so that you look at the tablature or chord diagram and then project it onto the guitar fretboard. The Rocksmith display, however, is read as if the notes are coming towards your guitar. This may be simple for absolute beginners but for guitar tab readers, it looks backwards/upside down and downright confusing. There is an option to invert the display so it more closely resembles tab (high e-string on the top rather than the bottom. Honestly, I recommend that you immediately start playing the game with the inverted setting as it will be easier to read standard tab when you want to play outside of Rocksmith. On top of that, the display moves around unnecessarily at times and can be a bit disconcerting or distracting.

-Tuner - Before every song, the game asks you to pluck each string so it can check the guitar's tuning. Unless it's absolutely off, it really won't care or ask you to adjust the tuning. It's a pretty useless and tedious feature since it doesn't really check for precision. I recommend using the built-in precision tuner or your own guitar tuner at the start of each game session to ensure that your guitar is well-tuned.

-Menus and loading times - Menus are not intuitive and constant loading screens are annoying.

XBOX vs PC Version
Should you buy the console version or PC version of Rocksmith? From my experience having both, it all depends on what you have and what technical issues you're willing to work with. There are a couple things that might give the PC more of an advantage of over the console version of Rocksmith. First off, with a little tinkering, you can play user-made, custom songs on Rocksmith on the PC. As far as I know, this feature isn't available on the Xbox or PS3. Secondly, laptops are portable; bring Rocksmith with you. Thirdly, for me it's a bit easier glancing from a laptop screen to the guitar fretboard than from a TV screen.

Overall though, it really depends on what kind of computer you have. I have a run-of-the-mill budget laptop from the $500-$600 range. It is not intended for gaming but the PC version of Rocksmith ran well enough until I got to more difficult levels. There is a graphic lag when I run the game on my PC so when the songs really start throwing a lot of notes and chords at you, it's difficult to visually keep track of it when it starts lagging. Unlike the console version, there really wasn't a huge issue with audio latency for me.

The Xbox has a known audio latency issue that's easily fixed by using analog audio without fiddling with your HDMI set-up. In my opinion, it's not as huge an issue as trying to figure out the graphic lag on the PC. Graphics were hands-down much better on the Xbox than on my PC.

All in all, if you do have a fancy gaming computer, I don't see any reason why not to get Rocksmith for the PC. If you don't have a powerful machine, it might be best to stay away and get a console edition if you have a PS3 or Xbox.

Conclusion

If you really want to give guitar a shot, this isn't a bad way to start out. Rocksmith has its faults but it can be a really great tool for learning songs. I want to remind buyers that is a game/tool. There are still a lot of missing elements that you won't get from Rocksmith (like how to strum a guitar) but for it provides, it's an excellent practice and learning tool, especially if you want to simulate playing guitar in a band-like environment.

If it's important to you, I am using a short-scale Ibanez GRGM21 Mikro Electric Guitar (Black Night). If you also get a cheap guitar to play Rocksmith, I recommend getting it profesionally set-up as having good intonation is key to playing this game. Out of the box, the guitar did not work that great with the game. After getting the intonation fixed, it works like a charm with the game.
Comment Comments (2) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Jul 14, 2013 12:57 PM PDT


Adam Hall SGS103 Universal Guitar Stand
Adam Hall SGS103 Universal Guitar Stand
Price: $14.30

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Works fine but has quality control issues, June 13, 2013
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
The main reason I ordered two Adam Hall guitars stands was because they were less than $10 when I purchased them from Amazon. For that price, I'm not super disappointed. However, the stand didn't really meet my expectations.

First some pros: It's foldable for storage. Also, the angle of the legs can be set at three different angles in order to accommodate guitars of different sizes. Structurally, it seems pretty sturdy. Accommodate both acoustic and electric guitars.

The bad: Padding that supports the back of the guitar is much smaller than what appears in the stock picture. Padding keeps slipping off on both of the stands and probably requires more adhesive. The stand doesn't lie completely flush on hardwood so it wobbles a teensy bit but nowhere near the point that I think it would be hazard to the guitar.

I have a love for smaller-sized guitars. The stand works perfectly fine for my Taylor GS Mini. However, my Ibanez Mikro is far too small to make use of the small, shoddy padding on the back support (see pictures I uploaded in customer photos). I can't really fault the stand for my guitar's small stature but if the padding was more generous, it would better fit the guitar.

For a bargain price, I'm not that disappointed. However, if price is no longer a competing factor I might just purchase another stand that is more tried and true.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Oct 8, 2014 6:45 AM PDT


Rocksmith Guitar and Bass - Xbox 360
Rocksmith Guitar and Bass - Xbox 360
Offered by Digitalville
Price: $34.00
23 used & new from $19.98

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An awesome game and learning tool- highly recommended!, May 22, 2013
= Fun:5.0 out of 5 stars 
Rocksmith is a pretty awesome tool for guitarists of all levels. I consider myself an intermediate guitarist. I am self-taught and mostly play acoustic/fingerstyle guitar. I caught Rocksmith on sale and decided to pick up an electric guitar to give it a shot. So far, I am not disappointed. The games main premise is to teach you songs. Learn the songs on a real guitar, score high enough and you unlock rewards and even more songs.

PROS:
+Rocksmith magically adjusts to match your skill level. It catches on pretty quickly to how many notes or chords you can handle. You never have to worry about never getting to the end of the song because Rocksmith constantly adjusts the song difficulty.

+Different rehearsal modes help master songs. I really enjoy the riff repeater feature. It takes a section of the song and you can either play the section slowly, gradually picking up speed each time you complete the section perfectly. My favorite is the Leveler mode. Each time you complete the section, it adds on more notes until you reach 100% mastery. If you feel that rehearsal mode doesn't give you enough credit in attempting more complexity you can manually adjust the settings in riff repeater.

+Song selection is varied. While i'm not familiar with a lot of the songs, it was a great way to get to know other genres of music and gain appreciation for them. I think for added variety they can add some jazz and blues types of songs.

+Virtual amp & cable: You only get one tone until you start unlocking custom tones and other gears. The virtual amp is pretty awesome and is one of the biggest reasons I invested in Rocksmith. I didn't want to invest in an amp, and for a beginner, I think what Rocksmith has to offer is more than adequate. Once you start unlocking gear, you can mess around and create your own tones. Score high enough on songs and you get that song tones as well. The cable is cross-platform so you can also turn your PC into a virtual amp if you have the right software.

TO BE IMPROVED - I found the game really innovative and interesting that it's difficult to really find anything that I absolutely didn't like. Here are a few points that could be improved upon, though.

-Rhythm/Strumming - There is zero instruction on rhythm and strumming patterns. Beginning guitarists will have to go elsewhere to learn how to create appropriate strumming patterns. For strumming sections, you can get away with all downstrokes.

-Finger placement - I think that Rocksmith could have easily added an option to display suggest finger placement on the fretboard. It already shows you, quite uselessly with fingerprints, that you should move your finger from one fret to another. However, it doesn't suggest which ones.

-Guitarcade - Guitarcade is a bit of a letdown. Some of the games can be useful tools such as Ducks/Superducks which lets you practice finding the right note on the fretboard. however, for many of the games, they are just that, games. I think there could have been more added value with a bit more focus on learning or another mode that was focused on learning scales/chords rather than playing (yes, I know it's a game).

-Audio latency - This really wasn't such a huge issue for me since I knew about it beforehand. We have HDMI audio set up and there is a pretty significant delay from when you pluck a note and when you hear it from the speakers. We left our HDMI set up as is and plugged into the standard audio port of the Xbox 360. When I play Rocksmith, I mute our HDMI audio and just use the audio coming out of the regular port through a separate set of speakers or headphones. Our HDMI set-up is still in tact and we don't deal with latency issues. It's not a huge deal to get around but for some of you may have to go a little out of your way to get it to work.

-Visual display - The Rocksmith display is innovative but as someone with a bit of experience reading music and tablature, it was confusing. Standard tab is read so that you look at the tablature or chord diagram and then project it onto the guitar fretboard. The Rocksmith display, however, is read as if the notes are coming towards your guitar. This may be simple for absolute beginners but for guitar tab readers, it looks backwards/upside down and downright confusing. There is an option to invert the display so it more closely resembles tab (high e-string on the top rather than the bottom. Honestly, I recommend that you immediately start playing the game with the inverted setting as it will be easier to read standard tab when you want to play outside of Rocksmith.

On top of that, the display moves around unnecessarily at times and can be a bit disconcerting or distracting.

-Tuner - Before every song, the game asks you to pluck each string so it can check the guitar's tuning. Unless it's absolutely off, it really won't care or ask you to adjust the tuning. It's a pretty useless and tedious feature since it doesn't really check for precision. I recommend using the built-in precision tuner or your own guitar tuner at the start of each game session to ensure that your guitar is well-tuned.

Conclusion

If you really want to give guitar a shot, this isn't a bad way to start out. Rocksmith has its faults but it can be a really great tool for learning songs. I want to remind buyers that is a game/tool. There are still a lot of missing elements that you won't get from Rocksmith (like how to strum a guitar) but for it provides, it's an excellent practice and learning tool, especially if you want to simulate playing guitar in a band-like environment.

If it's important to you, I am using a short-scale Ibanez GRGM21 Mikro Electric Guitar (Black Night). If you also get a cheap guitar to play Rocksmith, I recommend getting it profesionally set-up as having good intonation is key to playing this game. Out of the box, the guitar did not work that great with the game. After getting the intonation fixed, it works like a charm with the game.


No Title Available

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great for adults, too! Review from intermediate guitarist, May 20, 2013
I've been playing acoustic guitar on and off for a few years. I recently acquired the Rocksmith video game for the Xbox 360. It is basically a video game that teaches some guitar skills and uses a real guitar rather than a guitar controller.

I decided to try out the Mikro after picking up the short-scale Taylor GS Mini to replace my acoustic and had a great time with the short scale. I am a short female with small hands and short fingers. It's difficult to to maneuver my hand up and down the fretboard or to fret more advanced chords on a regular sized guitar. This is where the Mikro is great.

Out of the box, the guitar definitely needs a set-up. The intonation was so off that the video game wouldn't register the notes or would think I was playing the wrong note. After taking it to the luthier and putting thicker gauge strings on the Mikro, it plays great. The intonation isn't spot on according to my tuner but it's close enough that the game now registers the notes.

Tuners on my guitar work great and keeps the guitar in tune for quite a while. No real issues with fret buzzing. No sharp frets on my Mikro but I have come across a couple copies in stores that have pretty sharp frets and this seems to be a known issues in other reviews.

This guitar doesn't feel too much like a toy. It's pretty hefty for it's size. It produces a great sound though (in my opinion and I'm not expert). The guitar is definitely not for everyone though. If you don't have thin fingers, it can be pretty difficult further up the fretboard as the frets are noticeably smaller. While putting heavier gauge strings on the guitar helps with intonation and tuning, I felt that it was a bit more difficult to bend the strings. For a child, I think this would be a great guitar but it is pretty heavy compared to other budget short-scale guitars.

Overall, this is a great guitar even for adults. It's a perfect fit for me and after played great after a professional set-up. It may not be a high-end guitar but it's definitely a fun guitar to have around the house or to travel with.

Other budget short-scale guitars I've looked at were the Laguna LE50 Short-Scale Electric Guitar, Black Satin Finish and the Squier by Fender Mini Guitar, Torino Red. They are both about $50 cheaper than the mikro but I ultimately chose the Mikro for it's look and feel over the other two as I couldn't really find much difference in sound (again, not an expert). I didn't really like the look of a strat while the Laguna didn't feel as well-built as the Mikro. The Squier and the Laguna also both felt more like toys compared to the Mikro.


Brick City: Global Icons to Make from LEGO
Brick City: Global Icons to Make from LEGO
by Warren Elsmore
Edition: Paperback
Price: $11.00
72 used & new from $2.28

16 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great resource for aspiring LEGO artists, April 10, 2013
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
Whether you are a builder or just fan who likes admiring LEGO artwork, this is probably a great book for you. I am thoroughly enjoying it. Photography and production quality is very high. Comes with two pull-out posters which is great to check out more detail in the two mega structures presented but nothing I would really want hanging on a wall.

This book focuses on real world icons from major cities across the world. The book mostly focuses on architecture but there are models of other things that you might find in a particular major city like a New York hot dog stand or a London phone booth. The author also features mosaic artwork and LEGO models in different scales (mini, minifig, mega(?), etc)

If you're a big LEGO fan you've probably already seen tons of examples of what creativity and LEGO bricks can bring. What this book might add to that is just how some of these models are done. Step-by-step instructions are given for some of the models presented. Mostly these are mini-scale models, facades or a standalone tower. I like this because it helps me picture how some of the models are created and new techniques to learn. Larger structures in the book, of course, do not have instructions but I feel that if you had the bricks, the time and creativity the book would be a good tool in achieving grander scale projects. With just over 250 pages and dozens of models to build, the instructions are not quite as detailed or step-by-step as your usual LEGO instructions. The instructions are condensed so that several layers of bricks are applied in each step. The instructions are also a bit small so it's difficult to see all the details but you still get the general idea. Older children and teenagers can manage.

For parents and children: you only have to look at the cover of the book to realize that this is meant for serious builders and LEGO collectors. A starter bucket of LEGO bricks will not be enough to pursue most of the projects presented in the book. It's a great source of inspiration but it does require a fair amount of bricks that may be difficult to acquire off retail shelves.

Overall, a great buy. I'm a huge collector of LEGO (and books about LEGO) and this is a great buy for older LEGO fans and serious builders. My only complaint is that the pages could have been bigger to accommodate more detail in the instructions.


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