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Customer Reviews: 47
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Jeff Jones RSS Feed (Decatur, TX United States)
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Scarred Faith: This is a story about how Honesty, Grief, a Cursing Toddler, Risk-Taking, AIDS, Hope, Brokenness, Doubts, and Memphis Ignited Adventurous Faith
Scarred Faith: This is a story about how Honesty, Grief, a Cursing Toddler, Risk-Taking, AIDS, Hope, Brokenness, Doubts, and Memphis Ignited Adventurous Faith
Offered by Simon and Schuster Digital Sales Inc
Price: $9.72

5.0 out of 5 stars Faith isn't always pretty, September 25, 2013
I consider Josh a friend and know of his family's struggles well. I was looking forward to reading the book and was expecting a good one. Not to my surprise, it was GREAT. As someone who was going through some painful struggles of my own as I read the book, I appreciated Josh's direct and personal approach to dealing with pain, hurt, disappointment, loss and questions of where God is in our suffering.

Life isn't pretty and our faith can be heavily tested. Josh does a great job talking about the scars that life gives us and how our faith can be shaken and shaped by the difficult days.

This is a must read.


The In-Between: Embracing the Tension Between Now and the Next Big Thing
The In-Between: Embracing the Tension Between Now and the Next Big Thing
by Jeff Goins
Edition: Paperback
Price: $11.82
84 used & new from $3.88

5.0 out of 5 stars We are all in-between, September 25, 2013
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Jeff's new book is one that everyone needs to read at some point, hopefully at the right time to understand how they can enjoy the in-between. His writing using personal stories is inviting and real. His constant reminder that all we have is the present moment and to find ways to enjoy it, learn from it and use it for good is timely.

This is a book I am already recommending to all my friends.


A Carrot a Day: A Daily Dose of Recognition for Your Employees
A Carrot a Day: A Daily Dose of Recognition for Your Employees
by Adrian Robert Gostick
Edition: Paperback
Price: $11.26
231 used & new from $0.01

4 of 7 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Same old maxims, February 13, 2006
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I looked forward to receiving this book but was sorely disappointed with what it delivered. I've had the same thoughts on employee recognition forever. There were no new ideas and very little specifics on improving recognition.

It is set up in a format where you can have a daily reminder that employee recognition is good and that is the best part of the book.

Definitely not a must have but a decent addition for your bookshelf.


Goodbye Gutenberg: How a Bronx Teacher Defied 500 Years of Tradition and Launched an Astonishing Renaissance (Designer Writers)
Goodbye Gutenberg: How a Bronx Teacher Defied 500 Years of Tradition and Launched an Astonishing Renaissance (Designer Writers)
by Valerie Kirschenbaum
Edition: Hardcover
49 used & new from $0.74

0 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Reading in color., January 24, 2005
Reading Goodbye Gutenberg was a very different experience for me. I have long grown accustomed to the black and white print where the only changes on a page are the margins and font size. Kirschenbaum's book is certainly out of the mold and a call to consider what the future of book printing will be.

As I watch my children read now, I see their favorite books changing from colors and graphics to the same old bland print I have been reading from for years. As the change is made, I see them going from reading for pleasure as a first choice to music, movies and video games being a preferred relaxation activity. Can it be that the books changing to dull "imagery" are having a negative effect on their joy for reading? Both children read in the 98 percentile or higher level for their age group and long trips have always been taken while they read. This summer, the change occurred where reading wasn't the best way to pass the miles. I don't think this is simple coincidence, especially after reading this book.

While I do agree with one reviewer that the writing can be repetitious and, to some degree, condescending, I find the book overall to be fascinating and thought-provoking as to what the future of books will be.

Congratulations Valerie.


Digital Fortress: A Thriller
Digital Fortress: A Thriller
by Dan Brown
Edition: Paperback
Price: $12.44
651 used & new from $0.01

1 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Entertaining-if you enjoy the technogeek stuff, February 6, 2004
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The DaVinci Code was my first exposure to Dan Brown and I looked forward to reading Digital Fortress. His writing combines a great deal of thought provoking ideas and conspiracy theories.
Digital Fortress is about a computer genius gone mad. You've heard the story before and this one follows the pattern. However, if you enjoy the technological aspects of the book, you will enjoy the storyline also. It's a fun read and one that will entertain you for a few hours but don't expect anything new.


The Five People You Meet In Heaven
The Five People You Meet In Heaven
by Mitch Albom
Edition: Hardcover
Price: $20.00
3329 used & new from $0.01

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars 5 people - 3 actions. Read. Think. Act., January 12, 2004
If you haven't read Albom's first book, this one will hit you right between the eyes. If you've read Tuesdays with Morrie, you'll be prepared for Five People. Other reviewers have laid out the premise of the book. Let me tell you what I think will happen to you. First, this will likely be a book you read and re-read. It's a keeper that will occupy a prime spot on your bookshelf because it will make you think...and think some more. Albom has a quality of making you read about others and reflecting on yourself without pushing his writing as another self-help manual. It's a cute story, a parable I suppose, that has you thinking about the relationships you have, have had or wish you had. It then spurs you to think how you should improve or revive those relationships.
If you have or have ever had a relationship you wanted to be better, read Five People and you will be challenged, encouraged and very likely delighted to act on that desire. If you find your attitude headed the wrong direction, the ideas from this book will help you to change your outlook. If you think your job doesn't matter, this will help you understand why almost anything you do is worthwhile to someone.
This is a must-have book. I rank it in the top-10 of any contemporary book I have read.


The Da Vinci Code
The Da Vinci Code
by Dan Brown
Edition: Hardcover
Price: $21.21
5428 used & new from $0.01

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Thought provoking after you are finished., January 1, 2004
This review is from: The Da Vinci Code (Hardcover)
I was slow to get around to this book and then finished it in 2 days. I simply couldn't put it down. You probably know the basics of the story if you've read the publisher's review. It's another suspense-thriller, this time wrapped in the ancient secrets of religion. The book is a thrill ride for the first half and then becomes somewhat predictable, but still fun. At times, I felt I was watching a soap opera where you can miss several days and still know what is happening. At the same time, I couldn't quit reading it because I was pulling for the hero. I predicted the finish and imagine most readers do but would still recommend the book as a pleasurable read to anyone.
What I most enjoyed about the book is how it covers topics I'd heard about but know very little about. It seems the author did plenty of research and through that, has pushed me to begin doing my own research. If you are interested in religious history at all, you will enjoy reading this book and likely be challenged to learn more about the past.


The Servant: A Simple Story About the True Essence of Leadership
The Servant: A Simple Story About the True Essence of Leadership
by James C. Hunter
Edition: Hardcover
Price: $14.14
205 used & new from $5.11

5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Inspiring., August 31, 2003
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This may be one of the best books on leadership I have ever read. It certainly rang a chord within me and has prompted me to begin a leadership training program at my job using some of the examples from this book as the basis.
The Servant is a story of a ragged businessman having trouble in his personal and professional life. He's on the edge emotionally, mentally and spiritually. (Sound like anyone you know?) He winds up at a program in a monestary and finds one of his teachers to be a former Wall Street hot-shot executive. He initially works diligently to find the secret to instant success from the former Wall Streeter but learns that true leadership, true success comes from giving, not getting; from being a servant instead of being served. As you might know, Jesus is the model for servant leadership and the thesis of the book is based on principles illustrated by Christ while on earth.
Whether you are a Christian believer or not, the stories and principles found here are beneficial and can help you be a better person/boss/employer/husband/father. If you really want to find out what the top of the ladder is like, read The Servant. It will help you climb every step of the way.


Everyone Dies: A Kevin Kerney Novel (Kevin Kerney Novels)
Everyone Dies: A Kevin Kerney Novel (Kevin Kerney Novels)
by Michael McGarrity
Edition: Hardcover
136 used & new from $0.01

2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A thriller I couldn't put down., August 31, 2003
Everyone Dies is my first Michael McGarrity book and the start of a new series I will be reading. I don't know how this guy has stayed below the radar but this book is as good as any I've read in this genre.
Everyone Dies is the latest Kevin Kearney novel, Kearney being the main figure of the book and the series. In this book, killings in Santa Fe ruin a good vacation for Kearney, the Police Chief. At first, the killings don't seemed link but Kearney finally finds out that he, his pregnant wife and his son's family are on the death list. What ensues is a mad dash to find the killer and save his family from their destruction.
I think what makes the story so good is that Kearney isn't some daring, dashing hero but just a guy who is looking forward to retirement and moving to his little ranch. He has a rather bizarre marriage as his wife is in the military and stationed in another location, he has a son he only recently learned about and has a down-home quality that makes him the guy you invite over to dinner so he doesn't have to eat alone in some greasy diner.
The action in the story is always moving. The characters are added on the fly and he doesn't bog you down in mundane details. However, when he describes locations and settings in the book, you can easily picture them, especially if you've visited the parts of the country he is describing.
The only thing I didn't understand in the book was the need to address a gay character and gay community. It doesn't add to the book so I question why McGarrity would find the need to address it.
That said, I have begun my quest to go back to Tularosa and catch up with Kevin Kearney and his travels, pitfalls and career up to Everybody Dies. Pick this book up and you'll have travel putting it down until you are done.


The One Minute Manager
The One Minute Manager
by Ken Blanchard
Edition: Paperback
507 used & new from $0.01

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Ken Blanchard hits another home run, August 2, 2003
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This review is from: The One Minute Manager (Paperback)
I had put off reading this book because of the idea that management can't occur in one minute. Wrong. While it takes much longer to become a good manager, the tiny minutes in a day gives us ample opportunity to manage people for positive results. This book isn't rocket science. It's written in Ken Blanchard's sensible, easy to read parable format that makes it as much fun to read as it is insightful. Managers, whether aspiring, new or old-hands will find something that challenges them to be better working with their people. I suggest you make it required reading for your management staff.


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