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WWE The American Dream: The Dusty Rhodes Story
WWE The American Dream: The Dusty Rhodes Story
DVD

4.0 out of 5 stars The Sport Cannot Do Without "The Dream", October 30, 2014
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Trying to write the history of professional wrestling without including the former Virgil Runnels is parallel to talking about the Founding Fathers without mentioning "The Federalist Papers." This documentary captures brilliantly the excitement Dusty created whichever ring he exercised a well-aimed elbow or figure-four leglock. You will wish you lived back in the times when Rhodes dominated the Florida and Georgia scenes. A very poignant counterpoint to all the match action is being honest about the falling out Dusty had with his eldest son Dustin (Goldust). At present Rhodes is doing behind the scenes work for WWE, but I look forward to the day when the plumber's son steps into the arena again to "manage" both Goldust and Cody Rhodes to tag team glory. Dusty's late fellow Texas Outlaw, Dick Murdoch, would assuredly approve that move.


Sherlock Holmes
Sherlock Holmes
DVD
Price: $3.99

4.0 out of 5 stars If You Are A Fan of One or Both, See It!, October 30, 2014
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Last month I saw this silent restoration as part of a Holmes film festival. Both in private and public venues it holds up magnificently. Roland Young is a revelation to watch as Dr. Watson - it was hard not to compare his mute presence here to what he added to many good talkies in the Thirties including "Ruggles of Red Gap" and "Topper." The chief attraction however is "The Great Profile." It is impossible to look away whenever Barrymore is on screen as "The Great Detective." His granddaughter Drew has a certain amount of that same quality, a fact enormously apparent in "Grey Gardens." Any Holmes or Barrymore fan would be misguided to pass up this classic.


I Never Met a Kid I Liked Edited by Paul Mason
I Never Met a Kid I Liked Edited by Paul Mason
by W. C. Fields
Edition: Hardcover
21 used & new from $0.09

4.0 out of 5 stars Step Up From A Previous Effort, October 30, 2014
Stanyan Books did better organization of this book of quotes by Mr. Fields than "Never Trust a Man Who Doesn't Drink." When dealing with a pioneering film comedian it is better to have a logical balance of photographs and comments. Mr. Mason achieves this end with satisfying results. Enjoy my chickadees!


Never trust a man who doesn't drink (A Stanyan book, 32)
Never trust a man who doesn't drink (A Stanyan book, 32)
by W. C. Fields
Edition: Hardcover
51 used & new from $0.01

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A Collection Viewed With Perspective, October 29, 2014
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The book jacket to this thin collection attributes the often crimson nose of Mr. Fields to alcohol. His surviving relatives point to pictures of W.C.'s mother in order to say it was a family trait. Such a debate would be an interesting read in and of itself. "Never Trust A Man" centers its interest in quotations by Chairman Fields from numerous sources. Perhaps we have reached a point that we look upon the alcoholic element of the Fields character with a cynical eye given what we know now about the disease. What started as something kept about in order not to be lonely along the vaudeville road turned into an escape when things went not according to plan. The quote that ends this book concerning saloons is thus poignant: " I don't know why I ever come in here. The flies get the best of everything."


Self-Love
Self-Love
by Robert H. Schuller
Edition: Mass Market Paperback
137 used & new from $0.01

4.0 out of 5 stars A Must For Fans of Schuller, October 29, 2014
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This review is from: Self-Love (Mass Market Paperback)
This was perhaps the most important book Schuller wrote outside of "More Ahead With Possibility Thinking." He came to realize there was a reason why some people did not adapt the Bible-based teachings for which he became known. An exerpt:

It’s not a sin to experience a wonderful feeling of self-affection. It is a sin not to love what God loves. True religion teaches that God loves every person. No person will love God so long as he fails to love himself. Jesus Christ had this remarkable perception when He offered the eleventh commandment, Thou shall love the Lord thy God and thy neigbbor as thyself. A member of my church who was a millionaire lost his entire fortune. Worse yet – he lost all of his self-respect. As his spiritual aiming to rebuild his broken spirit, I asked, “Do you love God?” “Yes” was the reply.“Do you love yourself?”“No.”
Then you do not really love God, for God lives within you too,” I said.
He understood the fact that if you say you love God and do not love yourself, you are not being honest! Understanding this he decided to learn to love himself. When he succeeded, his earlier “love of God” turned into a really powerful belief in God. So strong was this belief that started over again and is today moving ahead rapidly

Even if this is your first time with Schuller, it is well worth the read since it deals with a condition afflicting many at the core..


You Can Become the Person You Want to Be
You Can Become the Person You Want to Be
by Robert Harold Schuller
Edition: Mass Market Paperback
78 used & new from $0.01

4.0 out of 5 stars And You'll Benefit From Reading About It, October 29, 2014
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An exerpt from a most useful volume:
The author and playwright William Saroyan was inspired to self-confidence at the age of thirteen. He had just purchased a typewriter. His esteemed granduncle Garabed visited him not too long after. “My boy, what’s that contraption?” the old gent asked. “A typewriter, sir,” the lad answered. “What’s it for?” “For clear writing, sir.” And William handed him a sample. “What’s this writing?” “Philosophical sayings.” “Whose?” “Mine, sir.” The wise old fellow studied the sheet and then handed it back to his nephew and said, “Proceed, for it is not impossible to walk on water.” “I knew then I could do it,” William Saroyan recalls. Self-confidence, strong enough, to last him a lifetime, was born within him then and there.
This is only a sample of the anecdotes Schuller utilized to balance out clear teaching on his subject. For more, by all means turn the pages!


Minsky's Follies
Minsky's Follies
VHS

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Burlesque For Some, But Not For All, October 11, 2014
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This review is from: Minsky's Follies (VHS Tape)
This 1982 HBO variety special is all right for some good reasons. A top one is it serves as a reminder of how much long gone performers such as Stubby Kaye, Phyllis Diller and Edie Adams are missed by lovers of good entertainment. Miss Adams is especially good in fans and paired with statuesque Jeanne Linero in the duet "Why is a Nice Girl Like Me Working in a Joint Like This?" Edie also throws in her Mae West impression into the mayhem that constitutes the "Crazy Train" ensemble sketch that at one point becomes a Pullman car version of the joke wall from "Rowan and Martin's Laugh-In." Rip Taylor and Julie Newmar are hysterical in an insurance sketch all hinging on a case of misunderstanding that threatens to make the Ripper a nervous wreck. Dancing is sadlly limited to topless showgirls opening and closing the show plus a cutie chorus in the production number "Nymphos of the Nile" to which Taylor provides the male point of view. Solo artist Brandi Doran expertly bumps, grinds and peels her way to "Night Train" in an otherwise predictable premise of ballerina turned stripper. If you just want familiar faces thrust into the world of Minsky's these "Follies" are worth the time. If you expect more, look elsewhere.


A Man Called Paladin
A Man Called Paladin
by Frank G. Robertson
Edition: Paperback
5 used & new from $30.00

4.0 out of 5 stars A Volume for the Hardcore, June 3, 2014
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This review is from: A Man Called Paladin (Paperback)
Robertson's novel inspired by an origins episode done late in the run of the CBS-TV series should be a must for hardcore "Have Gun Will Travel fans," especially those relishing its current revival on YouTube and the Encore Westerns channel.


Widow's Peak
Widow's Peak
DVD
Price: $2.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars How I Like To Remember Natasha, May 22, 2014
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When I first heard of the sudden death of actress Natasha Richardson it was cause for deep shock. To see her on screen was to never forget her. This was especially true in "Widow's Peak" where as the sexy stranger Edwina Natasha Richardson stops you dead in your tracks. The movie itself is firm proof you can make an intricate plot entertaining. I read a while back that "Widow's Peak" was a project a then young Mia Farrow had wanted to film with her actress mother Maureen O'Sullivan. That dream never was fulfilled, but Miss Farrow was able to bring an aspect of it to life. I love the scenes she shares with the great Jim Broadbent as Clancy the town dentist. This was around the starting point of Mr. Broadbent getting recognition from American audiences along with his role in "Enchanted April." Although not playing the pleasantest of people Joan Plowright is marvelous as the town's richest widow. But most of all, "Widow's Peak" is how I like to remember the beautiful Natasha Richardson. She captivates every scene in which she appears in this film. Assuredly her grandfather Michael Redgrave would have approved that outcome.


Radio Unnameable
Radio Unnameable
DVD
Price: $3.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars When A Radio Station Was A Societal Hub, May 22, 2014
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This documentary is testimony to what one man can bring about in the media. Bob Fass began bringing the world he experienced as an actor in Greenwich Village to people still up at what is still called by some "ungodly hours." He gave exposure to musical and spoken word artists such as Bob Dylan, Arlo Guthrie and Jerry Jeff Walker. Fass was the first to treat callers to the program as part of a community and not just as a way of making the host sound good. "Radio Unnameable" was a conduit towards activism that found housing for fire victims and cleaning up parts of Manhattan after a calamitous winter garbage collectors' strike. I was touched by the Verizon overnight worker who said she felt connected and a companion to Fass in one ear while she was at work. No matter what your opinion is of the politics espoused among the people who gathered and/or were drawn together by Bob Fass "Radio Unnameable" illustrates quite clearly how one personality's approach made and still makes an impact on the listener's world.


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