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TDP Far Infrared Lamp Latest Version Pain/Disease Mineral Heat Lamp for Chronic Pain, Arthritis, Rheumatoid, Carpal Tunnel, Inflammation, Migraines, Wounds, Circulatory, Menstrual Cramps, Injuries, Sprains, Diabetic Ulcers & More.
TDP Far Infrared Lamp Latest Version Pain/Disease Mineral Heat Lamp for Chronic Pain, Arthritis, Rheumatoid, Carpal Tunnel, Inflammation, Migraines, Wounds, Circulatory, Menstrual Cramps, Injuries, Sprains, Diabetic Ulcers & More.
Offered by JDS Enterprises
Price: $184.89

56 of 67 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Halogen Flood lights work better, October 2, 2011
This lamp is operating only at 738 Kelvins which produces a black body radiation spectrum. The "minerals" inside of it do not do anything. All objects that are at 738 kelvins (870 degrees F) will emit the same far infrared spectrum. This spectrum will be absorbed completely in the first few mm of water in the skin. Any effects deeper are from heat conduction. In other words, this is the same as a heating pad. An ideal lamp for healing arthritis, shoulder and knee injuries, fibromyalgia, etc is a $7 halogen flood light available at home depot or lowes. Halogen operates at about 4100 kelvins so it has a spectrum close to the 5700 k spectrum of the sun (see note below). Up to 1 inch of tissue beneath the skin in animals who are exposed to sun light (or halogen lights, or normal heat lamps at 2500 k) will kick-start the krebs cycle output into being utilized for more ATP. In injured cells, this helps them maintain function and repair faster. There is little to no effect on healthy cells as they adjust after sensing an excess of ATP. Pain from arthritis, fibromyaligia, knee and shoulder injuries, broken pinkie toes, etc is reduced from an 8 to 2 (on a scale of 10) in 15 to 60 minutes, depending on how strong the light source is. Sun light with a mirror to double the intensity and sun screen for protection will take an hour before maximum benefit is reached. Treatment can be 3 times a day. Look up Tiina Karu in Russia for the first serious work on this soon after LLLT came out. Later work has been done by Whelan in the U.S. with LEDs which started with grants from the military and NASA (for example, healing retina injuries in rabbits). Skin healing is not hardly improved as skin healing seems to be near optimum. Muscle injuries seem to have little benefit, but tendonitis is helped a great deal (first stretch the tendon, apply light, then follow with ice). I use a 75 W halogen spot light with a "lamp repair kit" (lamp cord with base that is normally used for repairing lamps) and water in a flat gin bottle to block the far infrared heat. Water in a zip lock bag can also be used. The clear water container (bottle or zip lock bag) is placed against the skin, then the halogen light source is used to shine the light through the water container to the skin. The water in the container absorbs all the far infrared so that your skin does not get hot, but almost all the red and near infrared make it through the glass and water, and about 10% of these wavelengths make it through the skin to help injuries beneath. This is stronger than LED light therapy devices that cost $1,000. Sun glasses are needed to protect eyes because halogen emits strong blue wavelengths that can be harmful if it is a spot light, even if just reflecting off the skin. Treatment on small injuries beneath the skin with this is about 5 minutes. If water is not used to block the heat, it can still be done but since the skin gets too warm, it has to be done more slowly and will take 15 to 30 minutes to see maximum benefit. Pain relief is usually immediate.

** note: The Sun, halogen, incandescent, and normal infrared lamps have a lot of light energy in the 600 to 900 nm wavelengths which are absorbed by copper and iron atoms in the CCO protein complex (4th stage in the electron transport chain) in mitochondria which pumps H+ to the inter-membrane so that ATP can be created in the final ATP step. Halogen is ideal. Incandescent and normal infrared lamps work, but they cause more far infrared heat in the skin. The item being sold here is operating a much lower temp and therefore causes too much far infrared. 600 to 700 nm is red light. 700 to 900 nm is called "near infrared" or "nearly red" light. LEDs are often used to provide the light. Fluorescents and some other light sources that operate at "2500 k" to "5700 k" are not actually operating at those temps and do not have a strong spectrum in the 600 to 900 nm range.
Comment Comments (47) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Apr 8, 2015 7:30 AM PDT


Daisy Outdoor Products Powerline 201 Pistol (Black, 9.25 Inch)
Daisy Outdoor Products Powerline 201 Pistol (Black, 9.25 Inch)
Offered by Famous Outdoors
Price: $14.99

3 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Very nice, August 22, 2011
As others said, it takes a strong pull AND push to cock this. But the good grab location made it tolerable. The trigger is also a bit stiff. I like both of these characteristics because I know my child will not be able to use it until he is old enough to be careful. Using a microphone on my computer and a good sound recording program, I measured that it took the BB 0.098 seconds to travel 24 feet which is 244 fps, so the velocity is a little more than the specs say. I can quickly cock, aim, and shoot a cardboard box 30 feet away as a fun way to take breaks away from the computer, while still sitting at the computer. It's a fun little pistol, but not accurate. Grouping is about 6 inches at 10 feet. The spring action throws the aim up before the BB has left the barrel, but the sights are apparently adjusted for this. If I hold it firm down on a post, the aim comes out low. So it is actually more accurate freehand, but not as precise. A pump air pistol would probably be a good bit more accurate. Good for testing your skill as a hunter because if you kill anything with it, you're doing pretty darn good. A good way to make a squirrel angry, and enough to put an eye out. Strong enough to go through 2 layers of cardboard at 10 feet, but not 20. Easily strong enough to enter inside an eyeball. Not enough to enter any wood objects. Murder on drywall.


Benjamin 392 Bolt Action Variable Pump Air Rifle (.22)
Benjamin 392 Bolt Action Variable Pump Air Rifle (.22)
Price: $149.95
11 used & new from $146.58

15 of 17 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great classic air gun, August 22, 2011
I'm 44 now and we had a serious fondness for this one when I was a kid. It was harder to pump than our others, and the gun sight is easy to bump out of alignment and has sharp corners, but this is the one we always wanted for accuracy and strength. I can't say it was a "fun" gun because you have to load each pellet, and use a bit of strength to pump it. It is also slightly heavier than the other BB/air guns, but not too problematic for a scrawny 10 year old. In our little BB/pellet gun hunting parties, there was the one with the Benjamin and then everyone else. It only broke when my brother swung it like a bat, breaking the stock while trying to finish a squirrel. That the older kid would swing it that hard and not know the solid wood would break shows how invincible we believed it to be. That was 30 years ago and he still uses it with a broken stock. All the other BB/air guns are long gone and we know not and care not where they be, but I'm jealous my brother still has the broken Benjamin, which is why I'm passing through here, looking for my son.

Thanks to the rifled barrel and good pellets, the scope option is not overkill. A quarter at 30 feet is an easy target. A squirrel at 25 yards is in serious danger. We always thought kids should not be allowed to use one of these like other BB guns and air rifles, unattended, and I still have that opinion.

Reviews elsewhere claim better than 1" accuracy at 20 yards, and able to penetrate 1/2" pine wood. 685 fps at 8 pumps claimed. One reviewer says his father knocked match heads at 30 yards.

Several reviewers report (as was my experience) that the sights are not adjustable enough to actually get you on target when sighting. So you have to adjust it as far as you can and then compensate. The sight is good enough for a quarter at 15 yards. Another reports 30 yards. Those wanting a better rear sight report replacing it with a peepsight. Some reviewers also complain about the trigger. But others who seem less experienced like the sights and the trigger.

I did not think anyone could ever improve upon this air gun, but the nitro piston single-cock mechanism gets the same power with 1/8 the pumping. The Benjamin trail is the new "upgrade" to this model, using the new technology and is one of the quietest out there, for $70 less than the very similar Remington with nitro. I also thought no one would be able to make and sell a more powerful air gun than the 15 ft-lb benjamins (same as remington and the very popular gamo big cat) and legally sell it, but the Walther Magnum is 25 ft-lbs (a very weak 22 gun powder pistol is 40 ft-lbs, a long rifle is about 140 ft-lbs). PCP models are a whole other class, reaching the power of a weak 22. However, looking around at reviews, this air rifle comes out on top, equal to the old gamo big cat that is cockable with 1 stroke and has a scope. I don't know if people really like the old school stuff without the nitro, or if "old" codgers like myself are biasing the reviews for sentimental reasons. Maybe the all wood construction of the benjamin is unfairly beautiful.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Apr 4, 2013 5:34 PM PDT


How the Mind Works
How the Mind Works
by Steven Pinker
Edition: Paperback
Price: $14.12
108 used & new from $3.77

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Admirable attempt, July 25, 2011
This review is from: How the Mind Works (Paperback)
He approaches the mind exactly how I would like: from an evolutionary and solid psychological point of view that tries to work towards brain structure and neurons. An improved version of this would be nice to have before studying brain structure, neurons, or A.I. It requires spanning an ocean of knowledge and viewpoints, which he does well. He spent too much text on anecdotes or examples rather than getting to the meat. Even after wading through simple examples, which were sometimes interesting or humorous, I would discover that the meat was just not there, or tucked away in 2 or 3 undefined words for those "trained in the art". Very often his ideas and anecdotes had fatal errors, but it's understandable because he's trying to cover so much in so many fields.

His objective was extremely difficult and wide-ranging. I loved his approach and way of thinking. Following a distinct outline would have been better. No single person would be able to fill in the blanks that this book creates. But it would be great if someday it could be rewritten by a collaboration of 10 genuises that are able to convey the meat with less text.

So I give high marks on approach and breadth of topics covered, but medium to low on conveyance (time is valuable) and correctness. There are few who could have filled out his outline much better.


Newtons Cradle Balance Balls 7 1/4 inch
Newtons Cradle Balance Balls 7 1/4 inch
Offered by Gift Depot
Price: $16.95
29 used & new from $9.40

48 of 50 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Works, July 16, 2011
= Durability:2.0 out of 5 stars  = Fun:3.0 out of 5 stars  = Educational:3.0 out of 5 stars 
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
As another customer experienced, I received it with one of the the fish lines broken. I fixed it with 5 min epoxy and dental floss, which was kind of tricky. The 4th ball was a little out of alignment and I managed to stretch the fish line without breaking it to get it closer in line.

The vertical distance from the supports to the balls is 5.5 inches. The balls are good quality (not chrome plated, probably nickel plated) and weight 45 grams, 2.2 cm diameter. It has 30 to 40 swings back and forth, 0.39 seconds between strikes, before becoming small and nonexistent at about 80. Reviewers complain that the balls move too much, even after the first strike, but this is normal if the balls are touching before the first strike. The 4th ball moves noticeably forward and the first 3 move back ever so slightly in accordance with a detailed physics explanation (see wikipedia). The silver support bar is cheap plastic.

As another reviewer said, I seem to remember cleaner and more distinct action as a child, but heavier balls would not improve it. A video on youtube shows what appears to be the exact same balls with a different support working much better, so the alignment must be crucial. An improvement would be if the balls were slightly separated, but this would require reworking the wire connections and being very careful about the alignment. With a separation, the first strike is a sequence of independent collisions which prevents the intermediate balls from moving. Contrary to intuition, touching balls decreases the effect, making the 4th ball move more and the 5th ball move less, at least on the 1st strike. You can confirm this by sliding quarters on a table under the two conditions of almost-touching and not touching. The almost touching condition should send the 5th quarter further.

If I manage to re-string the device with a slight separation between balls, I'll post a video to show the difference.

As others have said, I wanted a more professional very, but was not able to find it anywhere.
Comment Comment | Permalink


Korky 2001BP Korky Plus Flapper
Korky 2001BP Korky Plus Flapper
Offered by Binford Supply House
Price: $5.15
41 used & new from $0.50

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars rubber dissolves after 2 years, April 24, 2011
I bought one of these korky brand flappers and the rubber dissolved completely after 2 years, coming disconnected from the support. There should be a product recall. If the house happens to be empty when it falls apart (like a vacation house) you cold be stuck with a nasty water bill.
Comment Comments (3) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Nov 7, 2014 1:56 PM PST


Deflation: How to Survive & Thrive in the Coming Wave of Deflation
Deflation: How to Survive & Thrive in the Coming Wave of Deflation
by A. Gary Shilling
Edition: Paperback
42 used & new from $0.01

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars I love chapter 26!, March 21, 2011
The titles for this 1999 book are funny, which is why I give it 5 stars. In his 2011 book he discusses at length how great a forecaster he is....and repeats the same things this book.

Chapter 1 "Government Spending is Shrinking"
Chapter 11 "Slow Recovery in Asia"
Chapter 26 "Avoid Commodities and Real Estate"

Now take a look at what the government spent in 1999 compared to now, what Asian markets have done since he wrote chapter 11, and where commodities are today. Even housing has done better than he might have thought, still up 40% or 50% since then.

He wasn't wrong on everything. For example, if you had put all your money in a 7% 10 year treasury you would have beat Warren Buffet by a little. But you would have lost half your money in terms of commodities and Asian markets. Jim Rogers got it right starting in 1998, and he says this commodity boom has at least 5 more years, maybe 10. I'm willing to bet a lot that Jim Rogers still has it right, and that Gary Shilling will not beat Warren Buffet over the next 10 years with bonds. But I agree housing is going to stay a lot lower for a lot longer than people think.


Lindt Excellence Extra Dark Chocolate 85% Cocoa, 3.5-Ounce Packages (Pack of 12)
Lindt Excellence Extra Dark Chocolate 85% Cocoa, 3.5-Ounce Packages (Pack of 12)
Offered by World Wide Chocolate
Price: $38.95
21 used & new from $33.83

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Healthiest Chocolate that's Good Tasting, March 17, 2011
There is not enough sugar for most people to consider this the best tasting chocolate ever, but for a serious chocolate lover, this is the best there is. The ratio of protein to sugar in this is the highest of any chocolate I've seen that is not 100% cocoa. The amount of protein in it lets you know how much real cocoa is in it. My rule is to never eat anything that contains more sugar than protein, and this very nearly passes the test. No other chocolate I've found even comes close. It usually tastes better if you eat it a few months before the expiration date.


America's Protectionist Takeoff 1815-1914
America's Protectionist Takeoff 1815-1914
by Michael Hudson
Edition: Paperback
Price: $32.14
36 used & new from $24.96

9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Scholarly review of a neglected but crucial era in american economics, March 10, 2011
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This book is like a series of 20 mini biographies concerning important but nearly unknown political economy thinkers and "activists" during America's protectionist takeoff. I'm partial to biographies, so it was an enjoyable read. It's a shame this book is not getting wider exposure.

It's a 1975 rewrite of his 1968 dissertation, with some material added (I believe) in 2010. The 1975 printing had only 100 copies.

The book reviews and chronicles the diversity of protectionist thought. The title is accurate. He provides a lot of context, and I enjoyed the writing. Their thinking spanned topics such as evolution, religion, physics, slavery, and agriculture. It shows they had a lot of insight that J.S. Mill was not aware of. It's perfect for a historian who's primary interest is economics, or an economist who was not aware of these economists or needs an "off the beaten path" background in protectionism.

The 2010 preface explains why this book is important today:

"Having replaced Britain as the world's major industrial and creditor power after WWI, the US adopted free trade and open financial markets on precisely the grounds its protectionists [of the 1800's] criticized Britain for doing. American economic strategists had learned the lesson that free trade benefits the strong at the expense of the weak [by trading low-wage resources for high-wage industrial goods, undermining the ability to build capital and future potential]. Instead of examining the path by which the US built up its economic strength, foreign countries have adopted today's 'free-market' Washington Consensus. This approach misses the strategy by which the US rose to industrial supremacy after the civil war."

A key point of the book "The Shock Doctrine" is that is it possible to use "free trade" to "rape" poor countries of their low-wage resources by using those resources to manufacture expensive goods and sell them back to the poor countries at a higher price. This prevents them from being able to acquire debt-free capital or experience in high wage production. In the case of the U.S., we have preached free trade even as we have had subsidies on agriculture. This book shows in detail the thinking that was behind 1800's America doing the opposite of what we have recently advised other countries to do. The evils chronicled in the "Shock Doctrine" do not have to occur intentionally through the IMF and world bank. Merely religiously following free trade theory (wrongly believing comparative advantage can solve all ills) can achieve the same results. Protectionism has this historical evidence to back it up, and much of the thinking that led it has been lost, excepting this tome. Of particular interest to me as an engineer is that they were aware of the importance of having access to low interest loans (or direct tax revenue) to intelligently build infrastructure needed to efficiently use energy to replace low-wage human labor. Is this not the foundation of all human "progress" in the past 50 years? 200 years? People too often think technology is the driving force of modern progress. But the key is that technology should use energy more efficiently, not technology in and of itself. Has the standard of living in the U.S. improved any since the PC was born? Since we outsourced our labor with the help of an overvalued dollar? Free trade would exclaim we should have had fantastic progress, and yet even with great advances in free trade, technology, low wage foreign labor, and a previously strong dollar, it's hard for me to see much improvement since I was 15 years old 30 years ago. Unproductive financialization and modern monetary theory are two other aspects that Dr Hudson covers in his blog that explain the lack of tremendous progress in the past 30 years that we should have experienced.

England used similar protectionism in its rise, and the currency peg employed by China is like a broad-spectrum tariff or subsidy. The most fantastic growth stories of the past 40 years protected (or at least intelligently promoted) local industry in target foreign markets: Norway, Korea, Japan, Taiwan, and Singapore are the best examples. I should mention that their nearly-free access to technology from advanced countries was another key. It appears that in a world of efficiently producing industry, new entrants desperately need protectionism if they don't want to become economic colonies useful only for their resources. China's "tariff" and surplus of labor has helped the U.S. give away its primary "resource", industry, in exchange for our valued dollar. But that value can be traced to distant but important roots in protectionism. In hindsight, we needed to revert back to protectionism that would have prevented a negative balance of payments (not just trade deficit) so that all those military and trade dollars did not come back as treasury debt, getting us drunk on dollar hegemony.

More government (Democrats) or less government (Republicans), or more or less money printing is not what we need. We need more intelligent government and less dumb government, rather than religiously following a "more" or "less" doctrine. Competition with others and life itself is not easy. We have to be smart in how we run our country. We need government to invest to make us more valuable WORKERS who can better produce the things we NEED with long-enduring infrastructure that keeps our products competitvely priced. Any economics that does not have efficiently using energy to move matter for our needs as its foundation is fundamentally flawed. American economists understood this in the 1800's. The physics of energy and matter are the foundation of all science such as biology and chemistry. Economics is also not science without this foundation, and these pragmatic 1800's Americans are the only economists I know who point this out.

BTW, a lot of artificial intelligence is based on seeking energy minimization in the neural network, which is identical to seeking the lowest cost (Eric Drexler promoted economical thinking machines explicitly). But the AI machines must be given a goal toward which the minimal energy state can progress. Likewise, government is (supposed to be) guided by people to define the goal of the low prices (such as equitable distribution of wealth and minimal 3rd party costs such as pollution). The primary drawback in my mind is that there is nothing in the government-marketplace balance and check system to stop overpopulation.
Comment Comments (2) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Mar 20, 2012 7:43 AM PDT


The Shock Doctrine: The Rise of Disaster Capitalism
The Shock Doctrine: The Rise of Disaster Capitalism
by Naomi Klein
Edition: Paperback
Price: $12.33
319 used & new from $0.99

3 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Foundations of American Shock Doctrine, March 9, 2011
"Having replaced Britain as the world's major industrial and creditor power after WWI, the US adopted free trade and open financial markets on precisely the grounds its protectionists [of the 19th century] criticized Britain for doing. American economic strategists had learned the lesson that free trade benefits the strong at the expense of the weak [by trading low-wage resources for high-wage industrial goods, undermining future potential]. Instead of examining the path by which the US built up its economic strength, foreign countries have adopted today's "free-market" Washington Consensus. This approach misses the strategy by which the US rose to industrial supremacy after the civil war." - from Michael Hudson's "America's Protectionist Takeoff 1815-1914" which is a summary writers of that period who wisely influenced republican leaders enough to enact protectionism to prevent us from simply exchanging food and cotton for the industrial goods coming from Europe. We knew dependence on Europe would be a mistake. Their idea was to use tariffs to eliminate the need for income tax (non-existent until 1913) and thereby reduce the cost of our goods. More importantly, the tariff revenue was used to improve infrastructure like roads, education, and health care to further increase production efficiency and reduce labor costs, mainly by replacing low-wage unskilled labor with technology that could better utilize energy (beasts of burden, water, sun, and steam). In this way US learn to educate and use high-wage labor to eventually out-compete low-wage labor throughout the world.

Therefore there does not have to be intentional malfeasance for free trade to do great harm. It's just bad economics.


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