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Cookie: A Love Story: Fun Facts, Delicious Stories, Fascinating History, Tasty Recipes, and More About Our Most Beloved Treat
Cookie: A Love Story: Fun Facts, Delicious Stories, Fascinating History, Tasty Recipes, and More About Our Most Beloved Treat
Price: $3.82

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Who Wouldn't Love This Book?, November 16, 2012
Whether you're a cookie lover (like me) or not, this book is for anyone and everyone who is interested in the history, psychology and social aspects of food. Cookie: A Love Story is jam packed with so much fun information that you'll want to share what you've learned with friends, family and colleagues. I fell in love with it because, as a travel and food writer, I'm all about what I call the "Who knew?" factor. I want to be surprised. And Cookie: A Love Story has surprises on every page.

The author includes such cookie-related quotes as: "I think my grandmother actually smelled like a cookie and that's enough to get any child's attention," which was uttered by, of all people, the buttoned-up attorney F. Lee Bailey. Ever wonder what's the most popular cookie that's baked at home? It's the chocolate chip cookie, with some 80% of homes preferring to bake this cookie type, says Brette. And, guess why? One reason, so say food psychologists, is because our moms and grandmothers or other relatives baked 'em, so we keep sharing the love.

As a cookie lover, I'm always forced to ask cookie vendors if their varieties are chewy (which I hate) or crunchy. Invariably, they'll say chewy. (uggg) Now, thanks to Cookie: A Love Story, I understand why. The author quotes Dieter Schorner, a chef and professor at the Culinary Institute, who says that we tend to underbake our cookies in the U. S. because Americans associate the crunch factor with being stale. (Who knew?)

You'll find information on cookie-related blogs; cookie festivals, including a cookie tour in the Union Square neighborhood Baltimore where you go from historic house to house eating a different cookie in each; even cookie board games and songs.

How did the railroad in this country change cookie recipes? Bet you didn't think there was a connection? There is, after all, the colonists brought their recipes with them from England and, thanks to the railroad, they had access to coconut from the south and oranges from the west. Yummy ingredients.

Read through this delightful book and you'll find out how cookie popularity trends changed over the decades, from Cajun macaroons in 1941 to cottage cheese cookies (Who knew?) in 1962.

Fortune cookies are all about the Chinese? Well, maybe not. There's some good evidence that there was a Japanese involvement in this cookie's development in that fortunes written in Japanese have been documented. (Wow.)

You're probably wondering if there are any recipes in this wonderful book? You bet. And they're fascinating, too. Brette includes a recipe for Martha Washington's (yes, George's wife) shrewsbury cookies as well as the recipes for both lace and lemon cookies that Mrs. Lyndon B. Johnson baked. The book also has a recipe that reproduces my favorite Girl Scout cookie: the mint variety, of course.

I could go on and on about what I love about this book but why don't you just buy the book and see for yourself. You'll fall in love with it just as I did.


The Rough Guide First-Time Around the World: A Trip Planner for the Ultimate Journey, 2nd Edition
The Rough Guide First-Time Around the World: A Trip Planner for the Ultimate Journey, 2nd Edition
by Doug Lansky
Edition: Paperback
92 used & new from $0.01

9 of 28 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars waste of money, March 22, 2007
Anyone savvy enough to want to travel around the world would do well to avoid buying this book. It's got information that any novice traveler would be familiar with, unless they never traveled abroad. It certainly can't help you plan a trip around the world; but maybe around the block.


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