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Silver
Silver
Price: $4.99

4.0 out of 5 stars Wild, Wild West, September 15, 2014
This review is from: Silver (Kindle Edition)
Set in the small mining town of Silver in the late eighteen sixties, the story concerns the adventures of-Adelaide Johnson. Addie grew up in the mid-west, traveling to Silver to search for her father who had arrived in town some time earlier, hoping to strike it rich. Her father died when his mine caved in. Addie inherits his silver mine. Even though she has no interest in being a prospector, she falls in love with the town and decides to stay.

She becomes the teacher for the town’s school and, as the book opens, has taken a second job as a reporter for the local newspaper, writing a column about the citizens of the town and current events. The town’s sheriff, Dan Forrester, falls in love with Addie, and, even though she does not return his feelings, he becomes her special friend and protector.

The reader is treated to a light-hearted look at the activities in the town− the fourth of July festivities, dances, book clubs, and musical events. We read about the pompous mayor, the blacksmith, the owner of the dry goods store, and the miners. We learn about crime – fighting, drinking, prostitution, even murder. While a western mining town might seem to be far removed from large cities in the East, if it happened in the East, it happened in Silver.

The story is written in the style that one might have expected to find in a book written in Addie’s time. The language and the phraseology are those of that period, rather than of the twenty-first century. Addie’s newspaper columns, for example, sound exactly like the narrative, itself. The style is unusual, and it contributes to one’s enjoyment of the book. The author manages to present events in a rather lighthearted fashion, with the result that, even though some very tragic events occur, the story is a joy to read.

I thoroughly enjoyed Silver. The writing was good, the dialogue was convincing, and the story was entertaining. Good book!

David Burnett for the Kindle Book Review
I received a copy of the book in exchange for a fair and unbiased review.


Bringing Up Mike
Bringing Up Mike
Price: $7.00

3.0 out of 5 stars Can an AI Be Taught Morality?, September 14, 2014
This review is from: Bringing Up Mike (Kindle Edition)
Joe Dacy II (The Kindle Book Review).

This story starts with a rather stereotypical character: a socially-awkward teen prodigy with long hair, thick glasses and an aversion to authority. Using the resources of the government he’s developed a functional Artificial Intelligence program (AI) he calls Mike. The quirky program has passed the Turin test in the lab, but can “he” do so in the real world? Over the 11 months related in the book, our geek, Joe, is determined to find out.

When the novel stays on point it provides some intriguing comparisons between how humans grow to be moral (or don’t in some cases) and how an AI might be taught those lessons.

There are some interesting parallels drawn between those two types of “students” and how a horse is trained to be accepted in the human world. The author obviously knows a lot about horses. In fact, one can tell that, as a whole, the book was well-researched. The characters are well drawn and the novel is well edited. As a movie it would be rated PG.

I do have some issues with the writing itself. Readers will find many long stretches of dialogue written in a simplistic, Socratic-method pattern of question/answer, question/answer, question/answer.

Effectively, the technique forces moral topics (of all kinds) into the plot. In this “injection” mode, the characters all speak in perfectly-formed, complete sentences. These scripts can come across as didactic or “preachy,” and tend to detract from the narrative.

The novel is really more of a morality play, less science-fiction than social fiction with a “soft” SF component. Given the character set it’s definitely geared to a teen audience. Potential readers should keep that in mind when considering it.

The Kindle Book Review received a free copy of this book for an independent, fair, and honest review. We are not associated with the author or Amazon.


Once Upon a Road Trip
Once Upon a Road Trip
Price: $4.99

4.0 out of 5 stars This is a great story about a young lady growing up and becoming herself., September 13, 2014
I just finished reading Once Upon a Road Trip and it was an enjoyable novel. The main character is a young woman who sets out to find herself. She takes us, the reader, on the trip with her. She decides to take this road trip alone. However she does not realize how this trip will change her life. All of her outlooks will change and she will have to make decisions that she had not planned on. This was a true story and I felt as though Angeli could have traveled through Connecticut, and I would be able to recognize her. There are many adventures, both good and bad. This is a great story about a young lady growing up and becoming herself. I give this book a 4/5. I was given this book via The Kindle Book Review for the purpose of a review and all opinions are my own.
Vicky ~ Kindle Book Review


Predator & Prey
Predator & Prey
Price: $0.99

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fabulous!, September 11, 2014
This review is from: Predator & Prey (Kindle Edition)
I have never been a fan of short stories. I love getting enthralled for hours in a good, solid contemporary romance novel. With that being said, WOW was the first word that came to mind after finishing this story. Before I had finished reading the first page, I was hooked.
Intense, magical, stunning, amazing, and exciting are just a few adjectives that describe what you will find written on the pages of this short story.
I am making a plea to author James Horton; please, please expand this story into a novel. The possibilities are endless. Do I hear MGM calling?

Stephanie Lasley, from The Kindle Book Review
The Kindle Book Review received a free copy of this book for an independent, fair, and honest review. We are not associated with the author or Amazon.


The World's Game
The World's Game
Price: $2.99

4.0 out of 5 stars Secrets scam stupefied storied spies!, September 11, 2014
This review is from: The World's Game (Kindle Edition)
Joe Dacy II (The Kindle Book Review)

The world’s greatest fictional spies (first names only) enjoy a well-deserved retirement in a gated community drinking martinis and posing by the pool. Trouble is: they have no memory of who they really are.

But a few know that something’s not quite right. Conspirators conspire. Femmes become fatale. Henchmen hordes harass inhabitants. Liars lurk in lairs. And, vile villains visit vicious volleys versus very vexed victims.

“O Conspiracy! Sham'st thou to show thy dang'rous brow by night, when evils are most free? O then, by day where wilt thou find a cavern dark enought o mask thy monstrous visage?” (Shakespeare, Julius Caesar)

Sorry, got carried away there. And so does this quirky novel! Oh, yes, review. Forgot about that.

So, points off for treating a very old concept, bringing to mind the SF TV series The Prisoner (1967-68) and its Village. (“I am not a number; I am a free man!”) …And for long stretches of dialogue the reader may need a secret decoder ring to decipher.

Points added for cleverness, fall-on-the-floor humor and an unexpected ending.

In sum, the work may leave you shaken, but not stirred.

Note: The Kindle Book Review received a free copy of this book for an independent, fair, and honest review. We are not associated with the author or Amazon.


Lady Alene and the Widower (Shorts-off Book 1)
Lady Alene and the Widower (Shorts-off Book 1)
Price: $0.99

3.0 out of 5 stars Letting Go of Grief, September 9, 2014
Letting Go of Grief
This extremely short story tells of the pain and torture, of body and mind, a husband continues to endure fourteen months after the death of this wife. How can he learn to let go of the loving memories that plague him every moment of the day?
His body is craving the company of a woman, but his mind is filled with misery at the thought of acting upon that desire.
Read how Lady Alene soothes his soul and eases his sorrow.
Stephanie Lasley, from The Kindle Book Review
The Kindle Book Review received a free copy of this book for an independent, fair, and honest review. We are not associated with the author or Amazon.


The Guardian Angels
The Guardian Angels
Price: $0.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Moved to Tears, September 9, 2014
Do you believe in destiny? I guarantee you will after reading this outstanding, heartfelt, mesmerizing book.
Adi met Radha when he was twelve. He was being beaten by three bullies behind his school and Radha came to his rescue. Later that year, the same bullies beat Radha within an inch of her life and Ari saved her. From that day forward their hearts and lives were entwined.
Adi is a son of a billionaire and Radha is the daughter of a socialist which throughout the years has caused many spirited debates. Due to their sociopolitical differences their lives take totally different journeys, though their bond remained steadfast.
I am an avid reader of Contemporary Romance novels so I feel qualified to say Rohit Gore is a gifted author. I felt such an array of emotions while engrossed in this book.
In summation: This story is really a tribute to soul mates and guardian angels everywhere.
Stephanie Lasley, from The Kindle Book Review
The Kindle Book Review received a free copy of this book for an independent, fair, and honest review. We are not associated with the author or Amazon.


The Firedragon (Flynn Nightsider)
The Firedragon (Flynn Nightsider)
Price: $0.99

4.0 out of 5 stars Suspenseful and gripping with an unforgettable lead character!, September 8, 2014
Firedragon stars Aurelia Sun, a non-magical human who is as adept at fighting monsters as the magic-wielding Enchanters. Firedragon is the story of Aurelia’s participation in a monster-fighting competition where she competes against those with magic to prove once-and-for-all that magic is not necessary to fight against monsters. Unfortunately for her, the competition is riddled with politics and the government is rigging the games to discredit non-magical fighters. Determined to prove the worth of her kind, Aurelia must choose between the corrupt government she’s always been loyal to, or the rebels who fight for the rights of humans.

Mary Fan’s greatest asset is her ability to develop a strong lead character. Aurelia is spunky, confident, and driven by a powerful goal. I love when the underdog proves herself a hero. I also love a story that ends with a twist! I only wish Firedragon was a little longer. Aurelia was a great character with a good purpose motivating her actions, but when the story begins she is already the best fighter in the world and already overly-confident. Watching a character grow to become their best self is one of the best ways to get a reader emotionally attached. I would love for the story to be a bit longer so that I could watch Aurelia develop into that person. Hopefully Mary Fan will write a prequel!

Firedragon kept me on the edge of my seat with every new monster! Excellent characters with well-developed chemistry. Great job Mary Fan, I am excited to read more about Aurelia Sun!

-Lindsay Hiller, from The Kindle Book Review
Author of bestselling Young Adult novel Reaper

“The Kindle Book Review received a free copy of this book for an independent, fair, and honest review. We are not associated with the author or Amazon.”


Kitty Hawk and the Icelandic Intrigue (Kitty Hawk Flying Detective Agency Series Book 3)
Kitty Hawk and the Icelandic Intrigue (Kitty Hawk Flying Detective Agency Series Book 3)
Price: $2.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The third book in this enjoyable series offers loads of intriguing facts, September 8, 2014
A mock self-help book I once read suggested a list of activities call "Things I'll Never Do". The point of this anti-bucket list was to come to terms with the fact that most of us will not, say, climb Mount Everest. Once we recognize our limitations, we can move on with our lives. Certainly, one thing on my list would be, "Fly around the world in my own airplane." Fortunately for me, I can experience this pleasure vicariously instead, through the adventures of Kitty Hawk, teenage aviatrix extraordinaire.

In this third installment of the series, Kitty finds herself in Iceland, land of well, ice, very long names, and rotting shark meat. As tends to happen to our fair Canadian heroine, she stumbles upon yet another mystery. This time, someone is sabotaging construction equipment in hopes of derailing plans for an aluminum smelting plant. Could it be elves? Or is it something more sinister? Or is it sinister elves? If anyone can find the answer to these questions, it is Kitty Hawk.

Of the three books in this series that I have read, this was my favorite thus far. The mystery portion of the book was not quite as engrossing as that of the first book, but the wealth of interesting information about Iceland made up for the somewhat bare-bones plot. Before reading this book, I knew next to nothing about Iceland, but my interest was piqued from the beginning. The notes at the end of the book provided reassurance that the deftly woven facts that appear throughout the book were a result of extensive research on the part of the author. (In case you were wondering, rotting shark meat is a food actually consumed by some Icelanders.)

One small thing that is missing from this series, I think, it the presences of recurring characters, but given the premise, I don't see an easy way around that problem. Fortunately, Kitty herself is quite endearing, and I look forward to spending more time with her on future adventures.

Lisa Runge (The Kindle Book Review)
The reviewer received a free copy of this book in exchange for an honest, independent review. She is not affiliated with the author or Amazon.


PsyBot: A Novel of the Near Future
PsyBot: A Novel of the Near Future
Price: $2.99

4.0 out of 5 stars When VR Supplants Real Life, September 8, 2014
Joe Dacy II (The Kindle Book Review)

In the near future a computer programmer, already somewhat dysfunctional, finds his dreams taken over by a series of malicious nightmares that he can neither control nor escape from, all urging that he undertake some deadly mission he can’t define.

He suspects he’s the victim of a Virtual Reality (VR) program from his workplace. Finding clues to his dilemma in the vivid horrors themselves, both sleeping and waking, he embarks on a lengthy quest to fight back.

But who’s responsible? His drone of a boss? His quirky co-workers? His flighty lovers? The firm’s defense-contractor clients? Evil gamers? Aliens? Or is the whole thing solely in his paranoia-riven brain? He becomes unmoored from his “normal life,” moving farther and farther from that shore with every decision he makes.

The stream-of-consciousness writing style takes some getting used to. Our protagonist journeys on ships of high-masted prose navigating through seas of sentence fragments. (Flows? Floes? Get my drift?)

That said the work is a compelling look at the nature of reality, an interesting mystery and a warning about the possible misuses and consequences, intended or not, of future VR.

Note: The Kindle Book Review received a free copy of this book for an independent, fair, and honest review. We are not associated with the author or Amazon.


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