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Her Colton P.I. (The Coltons of Texas)
Her Colton P.I. (The Coltons of Texas)
Offered by Harlequin Digital Sales Corp.
Price: $4.49

5.0 out of 5 stars A Wonderful Read, May 2, 2016
I admit it. I read a ton of romances. This is a first-time author for me, and I'm so glad I was offered the chance to review the title. Ms. Autin manages to intertwine romance and suspense in such a way that it's flawless.

You can't help but fall a little bit in love with Chris Colton yourself. He's a hero--even though he doesn't think so. Pained by a dark family history--he's not sure he'll ever want to open his heart--but he's more than sure he's up for the job of protecting widowed single-mother, Holly. Holly has regrets of her own. Can these two, with the scars of their past, find their way together?

Danger lurks for all in this Texas town. Someone wants Holly dead. Ones that should care for her the most. Someone is killing women ...is Holly a potential target?

Chris's sister have been missing for years--is the a killer, a victim, or is she hiding?

This is a fast-paced read. You'll be rooting for Holly and Chris. You'll root for them to find their way, despite the darkness surrounding them all.

The writing is flawless. The characters are well drawn out, and the plot is more than a little engaging. This is a new author for me--but this won't be the last of her titles I read. Well done!

While there are a few things we've yet to discover, I'm assuming they will be divulged in the next in the Colton series.

Hope Welsh for The Kindle Romance Review *I was given a copy of this title for review purposes*

So many questions in this continuation of the Colton family saga. (Each book IS stand-alone, but I'd suggest reading them all)


Surreptitiously Yours
Surreptitiously Yours
Price: $4.99

3.0 out of 5 stars A Secret Eye in New Orleans, April 29, 2016
Claudette Lawrence doesn't seem to be that much of a wallflower - but seems to be mildly confused about a lot of things outside her friendly old house. Perhaps that's because her social circle is so small - or perhaps because she grew up under such unusual circumstances. One way she's trying to bridge the gap between herself and the workaday world outside is secret videotaping: a camera peering through a hole she's torn in a big shoulder bag that she hauls around the streets of New Orleans. (Later she learns that a smartphone will do the job of recording strangers in a more elegant way, but the metaphor of the "secret eye" is woven all through this narrative, so it's understandable that she starts out with an arrangement that's so clumsy and unreliable). In any case, Claudette's confusion is about to increase as she abruptly loses a close relative, collects the attention of a rather incompetent stalker, begins a romance with her professor, and tries to figure out what's happening with the two dominatrices who live upstairs. The chief issue with this book is that the city of New Orleans - the heat, the food, the reckless atmosphere - definitely takes a backseat to Claudette's fascination with herself. Things happen - although it doesn't feel like much is happening, since Claudette always comes back to herself. Because of this lack of external perspective, the narrative also feels a trifle incomplete, although reasonable people can disagree on that. [Nate Briggs for the Kindle Book Review]


Word of Honor (Knights of Valor Book 1)
Word of Honor (Knights of Valor Book 1)
Price: $2.99

4.0 out of 5 stars His Word is His Bond, April 28, 2016
Set in the fourteenth century during the reign of Edward I, Word of Honor, is the story of Geoffrey de Montfort, the lord of Kinwick Castle, a knight in service to his king,. While at war in France, Geoffrey exposes the treason of one of his neighbors and watches as the man is executed. The man’s father swears that Geoffrey will suffer for what he has done.

Geoffrey returns home and weds his childhood sweetheart. The day after the wedding, the man’s father kidnaps Geoffrey and locks him away. No one knows where he is, and, years later, he gains his freedom only by promising never to tell what happened to him. He keeps his word, telling neither his wife nor his king, winning the respect of both.

The main character in the story is really Merryn, Geoffrey’s wife. She is able to hold together an estate on her own at a time when women were frequently merely pawns in the games of power played by men and to bear and raise two children without her husband. The author gives us a strong, loving woman who is fiercely loyal to her husband and her children.

The book is enjoyable and easy to read. It has love and betrayal, good and evil, even humor. For a medieval romance, the book has a rather complex plot and at each turn, even though the reader believes he knows what is going to happen, he generally does not. If you enjoy this genre, you will definitely like Word of Honor.

David Burnett for the Kindle Book Review
I received a copy of the book in exchange for a fair and unbiased review.


UNPLUGGED: 15 Steps to Disconnect from Technology and Reconnect with Nature, Yourself, Friends, and Family
UNPLUGGED: 15 Steps to Disconnect from Technology and Reconnect with Nature, Yourself, Friends, and Family
Price: $3.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Nature lovers, unite! (And this book will tell you just how to do it), April 27, 2016
By now, many of us parents know that our kids would benefit from more time spent in nature. We hear about "nature deficit disorder" and the joys of free-range parenting. When it comes to putting our nature-aspiring ideals into practice, sometimes the Discovery channel is as far as we get. The process of leaving the couch and hitting the trail can be overwhelming. Fortunately for us, Jason Sperling's new book, Unplugged, has all the tools a family needs to stop watching nature documentaries on TV and start living them.

Unplugged, subtitled "15 Steps to Disconnect from Technology and Reconnect with Nature, Yourself, Friends, and Family", is about the author's family nature club, Running Wild, and how it came to be. As the title implies, this book takes the reader step-by-step through the process of creating the club, and at each step offers practical suggestions about how the steps could be adapted to fit the reader's needs. Each chapter begins with a brief description of an event from his own club, then expounds upon one of the steps in the nature club creation process.

Unplugged is the very definition of a how-to book. As I read it, I got increasingly excited about the idea of starting a family nature club, even though I was approaching this book as a reviewer. For someone who already wants to start a club like the author's, this book is a great tool. For someone like me, who hadn't really even considered the idea, this book was an inspiration. Some of the book's descriptions of Running Wild's club activities were a bit over-the-top, which is unfortunate because the adventures they've had were exciting enough without the addition of flowery language. I found the overall structure of the book to be logical and thorough, just what I look for into a guide book such as this. At times there were almost too many details, but the chapter breaks and headings make skimming for needed information easy.

Whether you are itching to start a family nature club, or have never heard of such a thing, Unplugged, the new book by nature-loving dad Jason Sperling will inspire you to pack up the kids and head for the hills, perhaps in the company of others. And, as the title suggests, what your kids find out there in the hills will be better than anything they've seen on TV.

Lisa Runge (The Kindle Book Review)
The reviewer received a free copy of this book in exchange for an honest, independent review. She is not associated with the author or Amazon.


Hunter's Daughter
Hunter's Daughter
Price: $4.99

4.0 out of 5 stars Crime in the Cold and Snow, April 16, 2016
This review is from: Hunter's Daughter (Kindle Edition)
For any “local detective” novel reader are looking for a sense of place. Not in the sense of a travelogue - although some crime fiction does combine sightseeing with violent death - but more in the sense of what it is like to be a resident of a location that is different, in many ways, from any other place. In the best of these books, the landscape becomes an additional character. As it does here: the white, empty, and hostile terrain of far northern Quebec. Jack McLain, RCMP, is the only law in sight - and not particularly happy to be so. He’s lonely and frustrated with his job. It’s 1963, so the only way to get around through the snow is dog power. And the Inuit, among whom he lives and works, have their own way of dealing with things. They certainly don’t want any khalunat cop sticking his long nose where it doesn’t belong. This book uses a hybrid technique of storytelling - first person combined with third person - to get parallel perspectives on the same events. It’s not much of a WhoDunIt (that issue is solved long before the end). But it does offer fascinating insights into the culture of a native people who are proud that they have survived, generation after generation, in a landscape so harsh and comfortless. This book is officially Recommended. [Nate Briggs, for the Kindle Book Review]


A Whole Lot
A Whole Lot
by Bradley Wind
Edition: Paperback
Price: $14.99
14 used & new from $11.25

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Memorable View from a Great Intellectual Height, April 7, 2016
This review is from: A Whole Lot (Paperback)
Norbert Weiner, the discoverer of cybernetics, is at pains to note in the first volume of his autobiography that—just because a child can solve mathematical theorems like a house on fire—mastery of symbolic manipulation doesn’t mean that a boy is any less of a “boy”. Weiner was awarded his PhD from Harvard at the age of 17. But he thought as a child when he was a child, and as a teenager later on. Prodigal mastery in one aspect of life doesn’t necessarily continue in another: which accounts for the discomfort that adults feel in meeting someone like this. For Abel Velasco, the narrator of this remarkable book, the situation intensifies because he has so few social skills to deal with the world outside his head. Although Mr Wind doesn’t have Faulkner’s stylistic fearlessness, this book compares very well with “The Sound and the Fury” as far as an interior portrait of a mind so much different from typical minds, and the narrative remains persuasive all the way through its considerable length. Very highly recommended. [Nate Briggs - for the Kindle Book Review]


Jukebox: A thrilling crime satire
Jukebox: A thrilling crime satire
Price: $2.99

3.0 out of 5 stars Fast-Paced British Gangster Tale, April 6, 2016
At the beginning of what he guesses will be a brilliant career in at the British bar, Nick is fully persuaded that he is well above average—and cleverly in control of events. Then his uncle shows up with a lot of cash—and some interesting plans. What Nick learns during the course of this narrative is that Ruthless beats Clever almost every time. One of the things you learn from this book is that British slang seems to be newly created every day (you may have to use a search engine to find the meaning of some of these). Another is: how worldwide financial structures tend to funnel money into the most amoral pockets, despite well-meaning laws trying to stop them. If you’ve enjoyed British gangster flicks like “The Long Good Friday”, “Snatch”, or “Dom Hemingway” you’ll probably like this fast-moving tale: although you might get the feeling, at the end, that this is Book One of a series—since “the end” doesn’t really feel like The End. [Nate Briggs, for the Kindle Book Review].


The Quiet Ones: A gripping psychological thriller
The Quiet Ones: A gripping psychological thriller
Price: $2.99

3.0 out of 5 stars Not Much Suspense, But Interesting Ideas, April 3, 2016
People have different points of view about what the word “gripping” might signify. I certainly don’t agree with that assessment in this case—although this book is well-written enough to be worth your time if you’re interested in what used to be called “kitchen sink” narratives. Narrative momentum is minimal in this, and there are no sideplots: so you have the day-to-day picture of a woman slowly drinking herself to death, married to be much older man with whom she argues and has sex. There is a brutal murder in there, but it’s not a question of WhoDunIt. If you’re acquainted with stories of sex abuse in families you pretty much know WhoDunIt. The red herrings offered up are not red—and I'm not even sure that they’re herring. In closing: I think most readers’ opinions will be heavily influenced by the revelations, like body blows in the last rounds of a prize fight, that start occurring in the final quarter of the book. Following the pendulum of Josie's mood swings, you wait a long time for something to “happen”. Then, when it does, it tends to strain credibility: even though you do find yourself in the middle of some interesting ideas. [Nate Briggs — for the Kindle Book Review]


Yetunde: An Ode to My mother
Yetunde: An Ode to My mother
Price: $0.00

4.0 out of 5 stars A Modern Relationship and a Timeless Folk Tale, March 26, 2016
A short - but very clever and humorous - consideration of mothers and daughters: just in time for Mothers' Day here in the U.S. This combines a child's perspective with a timeless Yoruba folk tale. The lesson being: "Don't mess with mothers!". Recommended. [Nate Briggs, for the Kindle Book Review].


A Warrior's Heart: A Medieval Romance
A Warrior's Heart: A Medieval Romance
Price: $2.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The King's Guard, March 24, 2016
Roran and Sean are traveling to the far end of the kingdom of Scamalhaven, searching for boys to train as members of the King’s Guard, the elite military unit charged with protecting the king. They hold trials in a small town on the edge of the kingdom. One boy who attends the tryout is too short and too small of stature to ever be a knight, but his skills are better than those of the others, he can fight better, he can run faster. Roran offers to take him as his squires.
In truth, the young boy is a girl. Brighid is an orphan. Her family lived in the capital of the kingdom and she sees service to Roran as a way to return to her home and to obtain information about her family.
Complications arise when her gender is discovered. Further complications develop when she and Roran are attracted to each other. Even more arise when she shows him the necklace she wears under her clothing.
Brighid was my favorite character. Even though she was a girl, she could best any of the boys who had been recruited with her. She knows what she wants and she is willing to endure hardship to obtain it.
I thoroughly enjoyed the book. It was easy to read and the plot was complicated enough to hold my interest. The characters are lovable and you want things to turn out well in the end.

David Burnett for the Kindle Book Review
I received a copy of the book in exchange for a fair and unbiased review.


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