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Jeffrey S. Erway "barleywhiner" RSS Feed (Navajo Nation, NM)
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How to Brew: Everything You Need To Know To Brew Beer Right The First Time
How to Brew: Everything You Need To Know To Brew Beer Right The First Time
by John J. Palmer
Edition: Paperback
Price: $11.27
146 used & new from $5.00

11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The most complete book for homebrewers, August 15, 2006
I picked this book up just before ordering my brewing equipment three years ago. 3 years, 52 brewing books read, 110 batches, 6 Best of Show awards, and a lot of long nights of drinking later, it is still the best book I own on practical brewing procedures.

The first chapter is THE perfect guide to making your first beer and not screwing it up. From then on, Palmer delves into more and more intricate procedures from brewing lagers, to decoction mashing, to yeast propogation and management. Lot's of useful charts and graphs throughout and a well put together appendix.

The one book I can say that EVERY homebrewer, no matter how serious they are, needs to own.


Ultimate Beer
Ultimate Beer
by Michael Jackson
Edition: Hardcover
61 used & new from $0.67

8 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars My path to beerdom, May 9, 2006
This review is from: Ultimate Beer (Hardcover)
6 years ago I took this from a friends dad because he never even looked at it. This was the first book I ever owned on beer.

I am now an award winning homebrewer, a BJCP beer judge, an avid contributor to ratebeer.com and a member of the AHA. I am going to be attending the American Brewers Guild in 2007 and will be opening my own Brewpub soon after.

This is where it all started. This book is that good!
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Sep 1, 2007 12:57 PM PDT


The Homebrewers' Recipe Guide: More than 175 original beer recipes including magnificent pale ales, ambers, stouts, lagers, and seasonal brews, plus tips from the master brewers
The Homebrewers' Recipe Guide: More than 175 original beer recipes including magnificent pale ales, ambers, stouts, lagers, and seasonal brews, plus tips from the master brewers
by Patrick Higgins
Edition: Paperback
Price: $13.41
106 used & new from $1.32

11 of 20 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Worst recipe book that I own., May 9, 2006
If you are looking to start brewing with extract then this might work for you but don't count on the recipes making anything that is close to professional quality beers.

The recipes are at some points, proposterously bad and some of the clones are just innacurate.

In all I own 48 books on brewing. Many are great, some are just OK and then a few are downright bad. This is by far the worst one that I own. Common, not even giving the brewer yeast suggestions???
Comment Comments (2) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Oct 31, 2009 10:42 PM PDT


Beers of the World: Over 350 Classic Beers, Lagers, Ales and Porters
Beers of the World: Over 350 Classic Beers, Lagers, Ales and Porters
by David Kenning
Edition: Hardcover
161 used & new from $0.01

28 of 36 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Innacurate and lacking, February 12, 2006
OK so this book does a descent job of introduction to beer for the novice. And when I say novice, I mean someone who has never drinken or been to a place that sells beer. So does anyone really need to know about Bud, Labbats, Molson, Coors, Old Milwaukee, Miller, or any other of the crap macros??? Really???

So on to the innacuracies:

P. 42. Hair of the Dog Fred is not a lager, it is a strong golden ale. None of HOTD beers are lagers.

P. 59. Post Road is a brewery owned by F.X. Matt and it is brewed in Utica, not Brooklyn.

P. 66 Stone Ruination is not an IPA, it is an Imperial (or Double) India Pale Ale. In addition, most IPAs are not in the range of 5-5.5% abv. Oficcially speaking, IPAs are anywhere between 5.5-7.5% abv.

I have found many others but I will stop here. No need to beat a dead horse.

Now, onto what it is missing.

BREWPUBS!!! There is not a single mention of beers at brewpubs. As such PP Solano beach, PP Carlsbad, PP San Clemente, Oggi's, Elysian, Russian River, Sly Fox, Vermont Pub and Brewery, The Cambridge house, Flossmoor Station, The Town Hall, and oh so many other great beers are not in the American section.

Ok so lets say that he only wanted to cover the breweries that were mainly bottlers. I can live with that. So where are Dogfish Head, Three Floyds, Alesmith, Avery and Jolly Pumpkin. Oh wait, their space must have been taken up by the pages of Michelob Ultra and Old Style.

Canada: One of the finest brewers in the world is in Motreal. While Dieu Du Ciel! is a brewpub, they do bottle and a discussion of current Canadian beer cannot be complete without them.

Britain: Pardon me but isn't the writter Brittish? Where are Samuel Smith's, J.W. Lee's, Thomas Hardy's, Courage RIS, and oh I don't know...Bass No. 1???

Austria and Switzerland: The most recognizable and noteworthy beer that either one of these countries ever made is Samichlaus. Not even a mention?

Belgium: Well I could write a lot about what is missing from this, I'll try to keep it short. He starts the chapter with a short discussion of Lambic beers. That's good. Then he states that sometimes the beers are mixed with fruit to make Gueuze. This is an incorrect statement and shows a serious lack of understanding by the author. Gueuze, in most cases, is a blend of 1, 2, and 3 year old lambic unless it is Oude Gueuze and then it is just the 3 year old. Lambic mixed with fruit is named by the fruit it is mixed with; Framboise, Kriek, Cassis, and so on. He then shows only two examples in the chapter of lambic producers, Mort Subite and Lindeman's. Ever heard of Cantillon??? A discussion of lambic cannot be made without the mention of Cantillon. They are the most traditional and well respected of Lambic producers. Lindeman's Gueuze is the only Gueze shown. That is the least respected of the Gueuze style because it is pasteurized and has artificial sweetners. If he wanted to stick to Lindeman's, the Cuvee Rene would have been a much better choice as it is a more authentic beer. There is also no mention of the beer Orval's brett characteristics or of how the beer has changed since they have moved to closed secondary feremnters. I would also like to mention that none of the Westvleteren line were included, easily the most sought after beers of Belgium

Australia: Foster's gets it's own page and Cooper's doesn't even get a mention. Nuff said.

In all this is a very flawed book written by someone who didn't know enough to know that he didn't know enough. Innaccuracies abound. If you want to read a well wriiten book about the beers of the world pick up Micheal Jackson's pocket guide or Ultimate Beer.
Comment Comments (3) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Jun 25, 2014 9:01 PM PDT


Radical Brewing: Recipes, Tales and World-Altering Meditations in a Glass
Radical Brewing: Recipes, Tales and World-Altering Meditations in a Glass
by Randy Mosher
Edition: Paperback
Price: $16.90
104 used & new from $5.00

36 of 37 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The most fun you'll ever have reading a brewing text, January 27, 2006
Funny thing is, I have read How to Brew and Designing Great Beers, written by two of the other "raters" of Radical Brewing.

If your a beginner looking to get into this hobby, BUY HOW TO BREW TODAY! It is amazing.

If you are a hardcore masher that has been doing everything "right" but still aren't winning those medals that you want, BUY DESIGNING GREAT BEERS TODAY!

Somewhere in no way inbetween these books is Radical Brewing. An informative text about beers of old as well as beers that have yet to even find a style guideline. I'm a BJCP judge and trust me, they ain't there. He completely shakes the platform that much of the American craft brewing scene has stood on, calling for the judicious use of adjuncts in many instances, including many exotic sugars that I had never even heard of.

The book also delves into the history of each style and how they have been produced throughout the years. Early on, he moves through the Belgian abbey ales. Later he tackles the challenges of Belgium with sections on sour browns, Flemish Reds, Lambics, Wit beers, and Saisons (though he doesn't do the best job of explaining proper fermentation of the saisons). He even does a synopsis of the Gose beer of Germany. I've only seen these beers once!

Randy is obviously someone who has taken homebrewing as seriously as anyone could, for about as long as anyone could. His book is entertaining and is a wealth of knowledge (even if I don't agree with EVERYTHING he says) for brewers at all levels. It is not a book that the novice should shy away from, yet it is also one that every advanced homebrewer should already own. And the historical quotes and poems on beer are just awesome. I used a good many of them on the beer menu for my wedding reception. HEHE!

Cheers!


Brew Like a Monk: Trappist, Abbey, and Strong Belgian Ales and How to Brew Them
Brew Like a Monk: Trappist, Abbey, and Strong Belgian Ales and How to Brew Them
by Stan Hieronymus
Edition: Paperback
Price: $14.90
97 used & new from $9.10

110 of 113 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Want to know everything about brewing Abbey ales?, December 9, 2005
So if you've just done your first batch of beer this is not the book for you. As a matter of fact, if you have just done your first all grain batch this might not be the book for you. However, if you are a seasoned veteran of the mash tun and want to really delve head first into some of the most beautiful beers on earth this could be your ticket. I know Stan and can affirm that he knows as much about Belgian brewing as anyone in the US. Interviews with Belgian beer masters as well as those stateside gives the advanced homebrewer or professional a great idea of what it will take to brew great belgian inspired beers. Clearly the most important parts of this book to the brewer are the sections on ingredients and fermentation. If you are a diehard English inspired brewer this book will be an eye opener as to what exactly is so different about brewing belgian ales.

While being the most accessible of the series, Brew Like a Monk does have periods of extreme tehnical pursuit and it is not just there to baffle, but to educate. Topics such as pitching rates, krausening, bottle conditioning, mash PH, hop extracts, fermentation temperatures, attenuation, and adjunct types are covered in full. For those that are so inclined, Malt analysis and enzyme content are also covered as well as fermenter design of the trappist and secular breweries.

As I said, this, as well as the other two in this series, are not for the novice brewer, but if you really want a definitive and complete working knowledge of belgian brewing in the trappist tradition, look no further.


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