Profile for Frederic Harwood > Reviews

Browse

Frederic Harwood's Profile

Customer Reviews: 7
Top Reviewer Ranking: 21,820,653
Helpful Votes: 391




Community Features
Review Discussion Boards
Top Reviewers

Guidelines: Learn more about the ins and outs of Your Profile.

Reviews Written by
Frederic Harwood RSS Feed (Washington, DC USA)

Show:  
Page: 1
pixel
Outlook 2000 in a Nutshell (In a Nutshell (O'Reilly))
Outlook 2000 in a Nutshell (In a Nutshell (O'Reilly))
by Tom Syroid
Edition: Paperback
Price: $23.45
54 used & new from $0.01

10 of 15 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars it is hard to crack this nutshell, January 28, 2001
the reviews promised something useful, readable, and relatively easy to use. Nutshell implies succinct and useable. This book is definitely not easy to read, nor easy to use. I bought it primarily to learn to manage my different account names and email accounts and funnel them all into Outlook or Outlook Express. After 2 hours with the book, i still have not found out how to do something that should be so simple. I find the book dense and technical and almost impossible to apply. Headers and chapter headings do not point you to simple applications in a transparent way, at least transparent to a non-techie. i am not a techie. I am a businessman, with a doctorate in English. I am trying manage what should be relatively simple. And the book does not deliver. I would return the book, except i highlighted one page before i discovered the rest of the book is such tough sledding. and i would not even be writing this review, except that last night i was asking my semi-techie son about Java programming, and he gave me the companion book Java in a Nutshell. I asked him how is it. He confessed it was almost impossible to use, too dense, too technical, too difficult. AHa, the Nutshell problem may not be me after all. I do not know who these guys are giving this book 5 stars. Maybe they are friends of the authors, or delight in obfuscation and deciphering technical directions. But for me, anyway, your average 50 year old businessman with a PhD in English and low end technical skills, this nutshell is very very hard to crack.


Plan Your Estate : Absolutely Everything You Need to Know to Protect Your Loved Ones (4th Ed)
Plan Your Estate : Absolutely Everything You Need to Know to Protect Your Loved Ones (4th Ed)
by Denis Clifford
Edition: Paperback
51 used & new from $0.01

17 of 17 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A practical, comprehsive guide, April 26, 2000
I have read about 10 books on estate planning, and this is by far the clearest, best organized, and most comprehensive of the lot. The authors cover the issues of trusts, tax planning and tax reduction, and asset preservation. This is the book to start with, and is really as good as they get.


Plan Your Estate : Absolutely Everything You Need to Know to Protect Your Loved Ones (4th Ed)
Plan Your Estate : Absolutely Everything You Need to Know to Protect Your Loved Ones (4th Ed)
by Denis Clifford
Edition: Paperback
51 used & new from $0.01

106 of 108 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A practical, comprehsive guide, April 26, 2000
I have read about 10 books on estate planning, and this is by far the clearest, best organized, and most comprehensive of the lot. The authors cover the issues of trusts, tax planning and tax reduction, and asset preservation. This is the book to start with, and is really as good as they get.


Venture Capital and Private Equity: A Casebook
Venture Capital and Private Equity: A Casebook
by Joshua Lerner
Edition: Hardcover
37 used & new from $1.00

141 of 157 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Forming a Venture Capital Fund, April 26, 2000
As an investor in small start ups, I had to read this book twice. The first read, the book didn't seem relevant at all. The second, somewhat more methodical read, the picture became clearer--The book is written for MBA students who think they might go to work someday for a firm that forms venture capital investment groups. That's nice, if you are thinking of working for a big venture capital company. But for the investor $300k - $3M investor wanting to understand issues like how much of the company is my investment worth, what percentage of equity should I take, can I treat my investment as a loan and still expect equity, (if yes) how does the loan repayment work so it does not strip the company of working capital and much needed startup cash, what controls do I have over management, how can I be sure they are doing with the money what they are supposed to be doing and not squirreling cash away, what happens to my equity if management needs more funding, how is management paid a salary, how is management rewarded vis a vis the investors--who is in line first, middle and last--and how do I get out early and late, this book provides answers to some of these questions buried in the case studies. You read a case study teasing out the rules of thumbs by what the investors and ownwers did in a particular case situation. In the process, the reader looks for guidelines, principles, and rules of thumb -- but these are mostly buried deep in the paragraphs or found between the lines of a case study or discussion of a case study. What to do, the rules of thumb for the middling-sophisticated investor are hard to comke by, suggesting this is a textbook meant to supplement classroom lectures and discussions. Richard Gladstone's Guide to Venture Capital is a much better primer, but the book that takes Gladstone to the next level and answers the questions I posed above has not been written by Lerner.


Estate Planning:  Complete Guide and Workbook
Estate Planning: Complete Guide and Workbook
by Esq., Barry M. Nudelman
Edition: Spiral-bound

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Rehash of the IRS Regulations, April 26, 2000
This is a very disappointing book. Essentially, it is a regurgitation of the IRS regulations on a number of estate planning issues. There is no interpretation, no attempt to simplify or clarify for the reader, and worst of all no advice on tax planning strategy given particular issues or circumstances. What do these regs mean? How should they be interpreted? What do they allow the estate planner to do and not to do? What is the most advantageous interpretation of the jprovisions? This book gives not a clue. For me, it was a waste of $145.


Real Estate Investments in Your Self Directed Retirement Plan:  A Guide
Real Estate Investments in Your Self Directed Retirement Plan: A Guide
by Hubert Franz-Josef Bromma
Edition: Ring-bound

84 of 84 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars You can set up an IRA to buy real estate rather than stock., March 12, 2000
This is a very methodical, thorough step by step manual for investing your IRA or retirement funds in real estate. This book was very helpful to me for a number of reasons. A year ago or so I asked three different advisers at Fidelity Mutual Funds whether I could use my IRA money there to purchase and renovate a piece of real estate. They each said no. But this book says the answer should have been yes. That I can set up my own IRA, even a rollover IRA or Keough, and purchase and improve real estate with the money from the IRA. And the book is very methodical about how to do it, including forms and steps in the procedure. I would think the book would also be helpful to estate planners and lawyers who are helping people plan their estates. One thing I wish the authors would address is why should you put your retirement funds in real estate rather in the stock market or mutual funds. Are there tax advantages? Is the income sheltered? Is it easier (ie fewer estate taxes on heirs) to pass real estate on to heirs--is the value of real estate discounted somehow? I wish I had had this book when I was talking to Fidelity so I could have rolled over those IRA funds into this building I bought rather than borrowing money from a bank.


Venture Capital Handbook: New and Revised
Venture Capital Handbook: New and Revised
by David J. Gladstone
Edition: Paperback
109 used & new from $0.01

31 of 34 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Venture Investor's Guidebook, February 13, 2000
I am in the process of investing in a start up and found Mr. Gladstone's advice invaluable to the investor. He describes succinctly, in bullet form, the conditions that an investor should lay down for the owner when offering to invest. Most helpful was his point that the investment is a loan AND a stock deal, and how to structure both. He also provides a rule of thumb for how much of a company the investor can ask for given the value of a company. And he reinforces the point that the investor can make 12-15% a year on the stock market,(even more today), so to invest in a venture that is almost by definition riskier will require some serious multiples. This was all in all a very helpful book to the investor. I did not find the book so helpful in finding and nurturing outside sources of money, which was what I was originally interested in, but now that I have invested some of my own money, the book is extremely valuable.


Page: 1