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Melitta 40994 1.7-Liter Kettle
Melitta 40994 1.7-Liter Kettle
Price: $35.99
14 used & new from $33.08

5.0 out of 5 stars Melitta magic!, March 2, 2014
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
An excellent, European-style kettle that will boil your water in no time, and looks good into the bargain – which it is.


Elmore Leonard's 10 Rules of Writing
Elmore Leonard's 10 Rules of Writing
Offered by HarperCollins Publishers
Price: $9.78

2.0 out of 5 stars No bangs for my bucks, August 25, 2013
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With due respect to Elmore Leonard - especially as he has just died - I feel cheated by this "book". I put the kettle on when it turned up on my Kindle. It had hardly boiled by the time I got to the end. I had assumed that Leonard's ten rules would be developed in the text. Instead, they were all there was - a few lines per rule. The illustrations added nothing. Ironically, given the author's austere prose, they are no more than padding. Pah!


Writing: A User Manual: A practical guide to planning, starting and finishing a novel
Writing: A User Manual: A practical guide to planning, starting and finishing a novel
Price: $9.99

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars At last ... a writer on writing, April 28, 2013
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I give Hewson's book five stars mainly because he is the first author since Stephen King to have written a book about writing who actually knows what he's talking about. Not only has Hewson written the bestselling Nic Costa series of detective thrillers, set in Rome; more recently he has successfully novelised a brace of Sarah Lund mysteries, taken from Danish television. His novels don't sell in huge numbers in any one market, but they always attract positive reviews and have fans across the world. This user's manual devotes too much time, in my view, to the technology of writing – which version of Word to use, which apps and how to turn your computer and other devices into virtual editorial assistants . But once he gets down to how you set about putting a story together and making it work, we're off to the races.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: May 4, 2013 8:42 PM PDT


Spies of Jerusalem
Spies of Jerusalem

3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Bringing life to the dead of war, March 19, 2013
The tight focus of this excellent historical thriller is on muddle. Palestine in 1917 was a fragment of the rapidly disintegrating Ottoman Empire - a fragment, moreover, whose precise extent depended on the religious, ethnic or imperial preference of whoever happened to be making the case at any particular moment. It was fought over by the Turks, the French, the British, the Central Powers, Arab nationalists and Zionists, all of whom felt that they alone held the key to its future.
The trouble was, then as now, that one man's solution was every other man's nightmare. The only thing that the players in this particular square of the Great Game could agree on was that everybody hated everybody else and that no one could agree on anything for more than five minutes at a time.
Colin Smith, a master craftsman and a former foreign correspondent of distinction, pulls together the strands of the Palestinian conundrum just long enough for us to take a close look at the competing players. Some are cynics; others are mere pawns; most will be called on to fight for their beliefs, or the beliefs of those to whose cause they are bound. Soldiers and spies are the principal characters in this drama, the plot of which is dominated by war.
Smith's re-creation of the Battle of Huj, won after a superb charge by 12 officers and 158 men of the Warwickshire and Worcestershire Yeomanry, is genuinely thrilling, written as a crescendo as if with Bolero in mind.
At the time, Huj was hailed as a masterstroke of courage and ingenuity. Today, like the many engagements fought centuries ago in India, it is all-but forgotten. What will not forgotten by those prepared to take the plunge is the insistent, percussive throb of Smith's prose poem to the dead of battle.


Palestine 1917
Palestine 1917

5.0 out of 5 stars Bringing life to the dead of war, September 8, 2012
This review is from: Palestine 1917 (Kindle Edition)
The tight focus of this excellent historical thriller is on muddle. Palestine in 1917 was a fragment of the rapidly disintegrating Ottoman Empire - a fragment, moreover, whose precise extent depended on the religious, ethnic or imperial preference of whoever happened to be making the case at any particular moment. It was fought over by the Turks, the French, the British, the Central Powers, Arab nationalists and Zionists, all of whom felt that they alone held the key to its future.
The trouble was, then as now, that one man's solution was every other man's nightmare. The only thing that the players in this particular square of the Great Game could agree on was that everybody hated everybody else and that no one could agree on anything for more than five minutes at a time.
Colin Smith, a master craftsman and a former foreign correspondent of distinction, pulls together the strands of the Palestinian conundrum just long enough for us to take a close look at the competing players. Some are cynics; others are mere pawns; most will be called on to fight for their beliefs, or the beliefs of those to whose cause they are bound. Soldiers and spies are the principal characters in this drama, the plot of which is dominated by war.
Smith's re-creation of the Battle of Huj, won after a superb charge by 12 officers and 158 men of the Warwickshire and Worcestershire Yeomanry, is genuinely thrilling, written as a crescendo as if with Bolero in mind.
At the time, Huj was hailed as a masterstroke of courage and ingenuity. Today, like the many engagements fought centuries ago in India, it is all-but forgotten. What will not forgotten by those prepared to take the plunge is the insistent, percussive throb of Smith's prose poem to the dead of battle.


Blackout
Blackout
by Connie Willis
Edition: Hardcover
7 used & new from $7.60

4 of 8 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Tedious beyond words, May 5, 2010
This review is from: Blackout (Hardcover)
I am a sucker for books about World War II and, as it happens, time travel. So this, I thought, was perfect for me. But what a disappointment! None of the tension and high drama of England during the Blitz, nor the glamour of travelling back in time were conveyed by this low-octane thriller, which had all the literary appeal of an afernoon "soap". To rub salt in the wound, the story doesn't even have an ending. We are left in mid-air, obliged, cynically, to buy the next volume in the series, if we want to find out how it ends. Not that I care one way or the other. This was a total, one hundred percent dud.


VOICES FROM THE GRAVE: TWO MEN'S WAR IN IRELAND
VOICES FROM THE GRAVE: TWO MEN'S WAR IN IRELAND
by Ed Moloney
Edition: Paperback
16 used & new from $7.06

6 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The truth hurts, April 9, 2010
This is a book that needed to be written. And Ed Maloney - an awarding-winning journalist with a long track record in Northern Ireland - was the right man for the job. To suggest, as some have done, that it is "unfair," either because it doesn't include interviews with the RUC and the British Army, or because it doesn't set out to support the official Sinn Fein/Gerry Adams line on the "armed struggle," is to miss the point. This is an account of what happened during the worst years of the Troubles by those who were there. In the absence of a Truth and Reconciliation process, it is the best we can hope for.


Unequal Verdicts: The Central Park Jogger Trials
Unequal Verdicts: The Central Park Jogger Trials
by Timothy Sullivan
Edition: Hardcover
114 used & new from $0.01

10 of 25 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Whoops!, December 7, 2002
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Timothy Sullivan is the executive producer of Court TV and still brings news of many big trials to our screens. In Unequal Verdicts, his bestseller from 1992, dealing with the Central Park Jogger case, he ends his final chapter with a description of how "a group of angry boys between the ages of 13 and 17 had used [a bar], along with a rock, a brick and their bare hands, to pound the promise out of [the victim's] future." But let's not forget his final word on the subject: "And on the streets ... lots of people wonder whether her boyfriend did it." Could Sullivan have got it more wrong? He appears never even to have heard of Matias Reyes, the actual rapist, who was in the middle of a murder and rape spree in the same area at the time. And that final, gratuitous swipe at the Jogger's perfectly innocent boyfriend! Can we really believe a word this man tells us about guilt and innocence?
Comment Comments (6) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Apr 17, 2014 6:04 PM PDT


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