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Hiking the Triple Crown : Appalachian Trail - Pacific Crest Trail - Continental Divide Trail - How to Hike America's Longest Trails
Hiking the Triple Crown : Appalachian Trail - Pacific Crest Trail - Continental Divide Trail - How to Hike America's Longest Trails
by Karen Berger
Edition: Paperback
36 used & new from $6.14

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Covers the Basics Efficiently, November 2, 2012
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This book is a good beginner's guide to hiking long distances on three different trails in the U.S. Known as the Triple Crown of hiking, the trails are the Appalachian, the Pacific Rest, and the Continental Divide. The author covers basics such as how to pack, how much food will be needed per person for how many days, and such. She lists the various shelters and talks about shelter etiquette. Throughout the book are various photos of hikers, of individual shelters along the trails, of trail signs, bridge crossings, flowers, and the like. The photos help break up the text and make the information easier to access because few pages are top-to-bottom text -- sort of like hiking one of these trails day by day, knowing that some of them will be easy, some moderate, and some difficult. All in all, a very helpful guide.


Too Many Clients
Too Many Clients
by Rex Stout
Edition: Paperback
2 used & new from $2,434.69

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fast Paced, Witty, Satisfying, November 1, 2012
This review is from: Too Many Clients (Paperback)
Published more than 25 years after the first Nero Wolfe novel, this outing by Rex Stout shows that the author had not lost his touch. Too Many Clients is the story of a corporate executive who kept a secret apartment for various sexual escapades. The executive is murdered, and suddenly Nero has many clients: the corporation, the widow, the couple who own the apartment building where the murder occurred, and a woman who was one of the murdered man's visitors. In typical Nero fashion, the detective figures out how he can make a lot of money solving the case. Also in typical Nero fashion, he fails to tell Archie some of the information he receives, keeping Archie in the dark. That doesn't stop Archie from making delightfully witty remarks. A very enjoyable read.


The Story of Ferdinand [With Cassette]
The Story of Ferdinand [With Cassette]
by Munro Leaf
Edition: Paperback

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Favorite as a Child, November 1, 2012
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This was one of my favorite books when I was a child. I loved the black-and-white illustrations, and I loved above all else that Ferdinand could not be forced to do what wasn't in his nature. In the end, everybody gives up trying to force Ferdinand to do what THEY expect him to do, and he is returned to his pasture and his favorite cork tree, under which he sits and smells flowers. The last line of the book is: "He is very happy." I always felt very happy when I read this book. I've recently re-read it and it still makes me smile. A classic!


The Delicate Storm
The Delicate Storm
by Giles Blunt
Edition: Paperback
16 used & new from $4.98

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not Entirely Satisfying, October 30, 2012
This review is from: The Delicate Storm (Paperback)
This is the second in the John Cardinal police procedural novels, Cardinal being the Canadian cop in the small town of Algonquin Bay in northern Ontario. Although this book starts out as gruesome as the previous one (Forty Words for Sorrow), with a man finding a dismembered arm in his yard and reporting it to the police, and with everybody initially thinking the corpse had been mauled/eaten by hungry bears, the author soon leaves the gruesome details and concentrates on a mystery that ends up being 30 years old, going back to the days of the Quebec separatist movement. Soon the Americans enter the picture, as does the Canadian Secret Service. In all, it's complicated and, actually, not that interesting. I like John Cardinal and his partner, Lise Delorme, and I like seeing how Cardinal copes with his home situation (his wife is manic-depressive) and how he deals with his duties on the job, but there's also a certain distance between the readers and the characters in this novel: it's interesting, but it's not gripping.


A Sudden Country: A Novel
A Sudden Country: A Novel
by Karen Fisher
Edition: Hardcover
92 used & new from $0.01

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Could Not Finish, October 29, 2012
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I really loved the idea of this novel about journeys on the Oregon Trail. But I found the prose very difficult to become interested in: neither the words nor the sentences sprang to life or lured me in. Nor did the characters. Nor did the plot. I never felt that the author was creating a story for me, the reader.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Feb 13, 2013 5:50 PM PST


Grammatically Correct: The Essential Guide to Spelling, Style, Usage, Grammar, and Punctuation
Grammatically Correct: The Essential Guide to Spelling, Style, Usage, Grammar, and Punctuation
by Anne Stilman
Edition: Paperback
Price: $13.73
87 used & new from $1.89

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Easy Reference, October 28, 2012
I have an earlier edition of this book. I recommend it for quick and easy reference about certain grammatical questions, but I must say that if you want or need a thorough explanation, you should consult the Chicago Manual of Style. For ease of use, though, this is a good book. Let's say that you need to refresh your memory about how the colon is used (or let's say you've never even thought about how the colon is used, but now, for one reason or another, you need to know). Grammatically Correct has five parts. You would look in Part Three, Punctuation, and you would see in the Table of Contents that each punctuation mark has its own little chapter or section within the larger parts. The colon is the fourth punctuation mark discussed, and it gets nine pages. The nine pages pretty much cover all uses of the colon, and there's even a short discussion of colon vs. semicolon. For most people, the information presented in this book is sufficient to answer the grammatical questions they have. It's easy to use, and that's a big plus.


Summer's Child
Summer's Child
by Luanne Rice
Edition: Mass Market Paperback
Price: $7.50
286 used & new from $0.01

3.0 out of 5 stars Formulaic, October 27, 2012
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There was little about this book that I found gripping. I did read it through to the end, and I enjoyed the Nova Scotia setting. The story involves a pregnant young woman who disappeared nine years earlier, and the detective and grandmother who continue to search for her. In a parallel story line, it also involves two mothers and their nine-year-old daughters. You suspect, of course, that one of these is going to be the the woman who disappeared. I found her reasons for disappearing interesting, and liked that element of the plot, but little in this book came to life for me. It seemed formulaic.


Absalom, Absalom! (Modern Library)
Absalom, Absalom! (Modern Library)
by William Faulkner
Edition: Hardcover
Price: $18.13
77 used & new from $0.81

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Loved It, October 26, 2012
This novel is said to contain the longest sentence in literature: 1,288 words. And the sentence is incomplete on top of that. This was perhaps Faulkner showing off. Despite all this, however, I love this novel, which is the story of Thomas Sutpen, a poor white in the pre Civil War South. Sutpen aspires to become part of the Slaveocracy that ruled the South. In his climb to building a 100-acre plantation that he calls Sutpen's Hundred, he commits many crimes against humanity, including denying his own children (Charles and Clytie) because they are of "mixed race." The story of how Sutpen does this and the obstacles he encounters, and how he and his mansion meet their ends, is gripping.
Comment Comments (2) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Mar 26, 2016 1:27 PM PDT


Herb Gardening For Dummies
Herb Gardening For Dummies
by Karan Davis Cutler
Edition: Paperback
Price: $16.12
61 used & new from $4.86

4.0 out of 5 stars Informative!, October 25, 2012
As one who has never had great success growing herbs (except for dill, which wants to take over the world!), I wanted to read a book on herb gardening, so I ended up with this one. I enjoy reading this book for the stories about the history of various herbs as much as I enjoy using it. And I really like the drawings, especially those of various herb gardens. The reason for four stars instead of five is that the information, of which there is a LOT, doesn't seem well-organized. You have to jump back and forth between different sections in order to get the information you need. But, I do recommend the book.


Missing May (Yearling Newbery)
Missing May (Yearling Newbery)
by Cynthia Rylant
Edition: Paperback
121 used & new from $0.01

3.0 out of 5 stars Something Is Missing, October 25, 2012
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This book was a Newbery winner, and Cynthia Rylant is an excellent writer, but for me this book kind of falls flat. Something -- some rich element of plot, perhaps -- is missing. The story, about twelve-year-old Summer, who lives with her Aunt May and Uncle Ob, centers around how much Summer and Ob miss May, who has died just before the start of the novel. The story is warm and heartfelt, the characters sympathetic as they learn to cope with their loss, but the book seems not substantial enough to stand as a novel.


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