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4x6 Shipping Labels , 3 Rolls of 450 Counts , Label Roll for Zebra 2844 ZP-450 ZP-500 ZP-505 © enKo Products
4x6 Shipping Labels , 3 Rolls of 450 Counts , Label Roll for Zebra 2844 ZP-450 ZP-500 ZP-505 © enKo Products
Offered by Pioneer Marketing Products
Price: $31.95
5 used & new from $23.95

0 of 2 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Really Cheap Labels, October 10, 2014
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
I've tried probably half a dozen different brands of labels for my Zebra printer trying to find the right balance of price and quality. The main selling point of these labels is that they're cheap. In my experience they're a little too cheap.

First, these labels are extremely thin. I found that when applying them to a package it was hard to get them to go on flat and evenly. I often got wrinkles and creases that I would have to try and smooth out with my thumb.

The problem applying them to a package is exacerbated by the fact that they come out of the printer very curled (probably because they are so thin). All labels curl somewhat, especially towards the end of the roll, but these were so curled--even from the start of the roll--that it was a problem working with them. If you print out and apply one label at a time it's manageable, but if you want to print several in a row to apply to packages later on you wind up with a curly, twisted mess. Other thicker labels that I've used that come out curled will naturally flatten if you set them under a book for a while. Not these; putting several printed sheets under a book overnight had no effect and in the morning they were as curled as ever.

These labels do have a couple of positive traits. One brand of very cheap labels I tried wound up gumming up my print head and causing print problems. These labels did not do that. (Those individual-use alcohol lens tissues are a great way to clean the print head should you have this problem.) Also, these labels seemed to stick sufficiently to the packages.

One other thing I did not like about this purchase: The seller of these labels sent me multiple messages nagging me to write a review. One follow-up message after purchase I don't mind; repeat messages get annoying quickly.

If you want the absolute cheapest labels you can find that won't gum up your printer these are probably it. However, for me the Amamax brand is noticeably higher quality for just a little more money and a better value in my opinion.


HP Officejet 7110 Wide Format ePrinter
HP Officejet 7110 Wide Format ePrinter
Offered by Galactics
Price: $206.38
48 used & new from $149.95

20 of 20 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Vs. Epson Artisan 1430 and Canon IP8720, May 22, 2014
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
I've tried a lot of wide-format printers over the last year trying to find one that I was happy with. Canon and Epson make high-end wide-format photo printers which are expensive, but I need one appropriate for general use in an office setting, which means printing lots of graphics and the occasional photo. Three I've tested in the last few months are the Epson Artisan 1430, Canon IP8720, and HP Officejet 7110.

SETUP
I intended to use the printer via a wireless connection. All three are easy to set up via WPS (Wi-Fi Protected Setup); just press a button on your router, then press a button on the printer and the connection is automatic. The HP printer setup guide stated that I would need to connect the printer via USB cable first, but this was incorrect. All three preformed flawlessly via wireless.

INK SYSTEM
The HP is the winner here in terms of ease-of-use. It uses the fewest ink tanks (four, vs. six for both the Canon and Epson), and to install the cartridges you simply click them in and click them out, sort of like using a ballpoint pen. There were no tabs to pull or caps to remove, as there are with the Epson and Canon cartridges.

OUTPUT QUALITY
Both the Canon and Epson had excellent photo-quality output. Even when using the "standard" quality setting I was able to get beautiful, vibrant prints on photo paper. If you compare the output side-by-side, the Canon may have a very slight edge in quality, but I really needed to take time and examine the prints closely to make this determination. The HP however wasn't up to the level of the Canon or Epson, probably in large part because it uses four ink cartridges vs. six for the other two. The HP's output looked dull and a bit washed out, even on the "best" quality setting.

PRINTING ON MATTE PAPER
Since I'm using this in an office I do most printing on matte photo paper. Here is where the Canon was the big looser. In printing graphics and images that covered large areas of a page, the paper that came out of the Canon was wavy like bacon, even after waiting for the ink to fully dry, and even when printing on thick (60 lb.) matte photo paper. I don't know if the Canon printer puts down more ink than the other printers thereby soaking the page, or if the ink is more watery in consistency, but the finished product was unacceptable. The HP was the best in this department with only slight wrinkling in areas of heavy graphics. The Epson was somewhere between the HP and Canon, with some wrinkling, but still very acceptable on 32 lb. matte photo paper.

PAPER HANDLING
Both the Canon and Epson have rear-loading paper slots, while the HP uses a slide-out tray on the front of the printer underneath the output area. Consequently, the HP has a smaller footprint when loaded with paper. The rear-loading method should theoretically allow for better handling of thicker paper, but I had no problem using 60 lb. matte photo paper in the HP.

SOFTWARE
Software installation was about the same for all three printers. (I always forgo using the included CD and instead download the latest software directly from the manufacturer's website.) When printing, the Canon and Epson both have a good number of custom controls in terms of color adjustments and custom paper sizes that were more than adequate for my needs. The HP had by far the worst software, offering very few options for color control and custom paper sizes. The HP software would also pop up a message for "free offers" every time I changed an ink cartridge; these were nothing more than advertisements.

The Canon did have one annoying trait in its software. There is a setting to "avoid paper abrasion"; this basically increases the distance between the print head and the paper to avoid the print head coming in contact with the paper and causing scrape marks. I had to use this setting because of the paper wrinkling as described above. However, when you print a page with this setting enabled, the Canon software throws up a warning message EVERY TIME a page is about to print, and you need to click "OK" to dismiss the message before the page starts printing. This made it impossible to print multiple pages and walk away from the computer, because you needed to click "OK" before the next page would print. The Epson printer also has the paper-abrasion setting, but it does not throw up a warning message and simply prints what you ask it to.

CONCLUSION
All three printers have their strengths and weaknesses. For me the Epson Artisan 1430 was the easy winner. The output quality is fantastic, it didn't saturate the page with ink like the Canon, and the settings you have in the software are more than adequate.

If I was printing only graphics where vibrant photo output didn't matter, I would choose the HP. It has the smallest footprint and is certainly the most uncomplicated of the three printers. It is also the least expensive of the three by a good margin.

If I was printing mainly photos on heavy gloss photo paper, the Canon would be an enticing choice. It had a very slight edge in output quality over the Epson. However, the Epson has great output quality and has performed flawlessly in the several months I've had it, and if I had to buy another general-use wide-format printer today it would be the Epson.


Epson Artisan 1430 Wireless Wide-Format Color Inkjet Printer (C11CB53201)
Epson Artisan 1430 Wireless Wide-Format Color Inkjet Printer (C11CB53201)
Offered by Brooklyn Parkway
Price: $308.87
69 used & new from $260.00

16 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Vs. Canon IP8720 and HP Officejet 7110, May 22, 2014
I've tried a lot of wide-format printers over the last year trying to find one that I was happy with. Canon and Epson make high-end wide-format photo printers which are expensive, but I need one appropriate for general use in an office setting, which means printing lots of graphics and the occasional photo. Three I've tested in the last few months are the Epson Artisan 1430, Canon IP8720, and HP Officejet 7110.

SETUP
I intended to use the printer via a wireless connection. All three are easy to set up via WPS (Wi-Fi Protected Setup); just press a button on your router, then press a button on the printer and the connection is automatic. The HP printer setup guide stated that I would need to connect the printer via USB cable first, but this was incorrect. All three preformed flawlessly via wireless.

INK SYSTEM
The HP is the winner here in terms of ease-of-use. It uses the fewest ink tanks (four, vs. six for both the Canon and Epson), and to install the cartridges you simply click them in and click them out, sort of like using a ballpoint pen. There were no tabs to pull or caps to remove, as there are with the Epson and Canon cartridges.

OUTPUT QUALITY
Both the Canon and Epson had excellent photo-quality output. Even when using the "standard" quality setting I was able to get beautiful, vibrant prints on photo paper. If you compare the output side-by-side, the Canon may have a very slight edge in quality, but I really needed to take time and examine the prints closely to make this determination. The HP however wasn't up to the level of the Canon or Epson, probably in large part because it uses four ink cartridges vs. six for the other two. The HP's output looked dull and a bit washed out, even on the "best" quality setting.

PRINTING ON MATTE PAPER
Since I'm using this in an office I do most printing on matte photo paper. Here is where the Canon was the big looser. In printing graphics and images that covered large areas of a page, the paper that came out of the Canon was wavy like bacon, even after waiting for the ink to fully dry, and even when printing on thick (60 lb.) matte photo paper. I don't know if the Canon printer puts down more ink than the other printers thereby soaking the page, or if the ink is more watery in consistency, but the finished product was unacceptable. The HP was the best in this department with only slight wrinkling in areas of heavy graphics. The Epson was somewhere between the HP and Canon, with some wrinkling, but still very acceptable on 32 lb. matte photo paper.

PAPER HANDLING
Both the Canon and Epson have rear-loading paper slots, while the HP uses a slide-out tray on the front of the printer underneath the output area. Consequently, the HP has a smaller footprint when loaded with paper. The rear-loading method should theoretically allow for better handling of thicker paper, but I had no problem using 60 lb. matte photo paper in the HP.

SOFTWARE
Software installation was about the same for all three printers. (I always forgo using the included CD and instead download the latest software directly from the manufacturer's website.) When printing, the Canon and Epson both have a good number of custom controls in terms of color adjustments and custom paper sizes that were more than adequate for my needs. The HP had by far the worst software, offering very few options for color control and custom paper sizes. The HP software would also pop up a message for "free offers" every time I changed an ink cartridge; these were nothing more than advertisements.

The Canon did have one annoying trait in its software. There is a setting to "avoid paper abrasion"; this basically increases the distance between the print head and the paper to avoid the print head coming in contact with the paper and causing scrape marks. I had to use this setting because of the paper wrinkling as described above. However, when you print a page with this setting enabled, the Canon software throws up a warning message EVERY TIME a page is about to print, and you need to click "OK" to dismiss the message before the page starts printing. This made it impossible to print multiple pages and walk away from the computer, because you needed to click "OK" before the next page would print. The Epson printer also has the paper-abrasion setting, but it does not throw up a warning message and simply prints what you ask it to.

CONCLUSION
All three printers have their strengths and weaknesses. For me the Epson Artisan 1430 was the easy winner. The output quality is fantastic, it didn't saturate the page with ink like the Canon, and the settings you have in the software are more than adequate.

If I was printing only graphics where vibrant photo output didn't matter, I would choose the HP. It has the smallest footprint and is certainly the most uncomplicated of the three printers. It is also the least expensive of the three by a good margin.

If I was printing mainly photos on heavy gloss photo paper, the Canon would be an enticing choice. It had a very slight edge in output quality over the Epson. However, the Epson has great output quality and has performed flawlessly in the several months I've had it, and if I had to buy another general-use wide-format printer today it would be the Epson.


Canon Office Products IP8720 Wireless Inkjet Photo Printer
Canon Office Products IP8720 Wireless Inkjet Photo Printer
Price: $249.99
23 used & new from $224.99

43 of 46 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Vs. Epson Artisan 1430 and HP Officejet 7110, May 22, 2014
Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
I've tried a lot of wide-format printers over the last year trying to find one that I was happy with. Canon and Epson make high-end wide-format photo printers which are expensive, but I need one appropriate for general use in an office setting, which means printing lots of graphics and the occasional photo. Three I've tested in the last few months are the Epson Artisan 1430, Canon IP8720, and HP Officejet 7110.

SETUP
I intended to use the printer via a wireless connection. All three are easy to set up via WPS (Wi-Fi Protected Setup); just press a button on your router, then press a button on the printer and the connection is automatic. The HP printer setup guide stated that I would need to connect the printer via USB cable first, but this was incorrect. All three preformed flawlessly via wireless.

INK SYSTEM
The HP is the winner here in terms of ease-of-use. It uses the fewest ink tanks (four, vs. six for both the Canon and Epson), and to install the cartridges you simply click them in and click them out, sort of like using a ballpoint pen. There were no tabs to pull or caps to remove, as there are with the Epson and Canon cartridges.

OUTPUT QUALITY
Both the Canon and Epson had excellent photo-quality output. Even when using the "standard" quality setting I was able to get beautiful, vibrant prints on photo paper. If you compare the output side-by-side, the Canon may have a very slight edge in quality, but I really needed to take time and examine the prints closely to make this determination. The HP however wasn't up to the level of the Canon or Epson, probably in large part because it uses four ink cartridges vs. six for the other two. The HP's output looked dull and a bit washed out, even on the "best" quality setting.

PRINTING ON MATTE PAPER
Since I'm using this in an office I do most printing on matte photo paper. Here is where the Canon was the big looser. In printing graphics and images that covered large areas of a page, the paper that came out of the Canon was wavy like bacon, even after waiting for the ink to fully dry, and even when printing on thick (60 lb.) matte photo paper. I don't know if the Canon printer puts down more ink than the other printers thereby soaking the page, or if the ink is more watery in consistency, but the finished product was unacceptable. The HP was the best in this department with only slight wrinkling in areas of heavy graphics. The Epson was somewhere between the HP and Canon, with some wrinkling, but still very acceptable on 32 lb. matte photo paper.

PAPER HANDLING
Both the Canon and Epson have rear-loading paper slots, while the HP uses a slide-out tray on the front of the printer underneath the output area. Consequently, the HP has a smaller footprint when loaded with paper. The rear-loading method should theoretically allow for better handling of thicker paper, but I had no problem using 60 lb. matte photo paper in the HP.

SOFTWARE
Software installation was about the same for all three printers. (I always forgo using the included CD and instead download the latest software directly from the manufacturer's website.) When printing, the Canon and Epson both have a good number of custom controls in terms of color adjustments and custom paper sizes that were more than adequate for my needs. The HP had by far the worst software, offering very few options for color control and custom paper sizes. The HP software would also pop up a message for "free offers" every time I changed an ink cartridge; these were nothing more than advertisements.

The Canon did have one annoying trait in its software. There is a setting to "avoid paper abrasion"; this basically increases the distance between the print head and the paper to avoid the print head coming in contact with the paper and causing scrape marks. I had to use this setting because of the paper wrinkling as described above. However, when you print a page with this setting enabled, the Canon software throws up a warning message EVERY TIME a page is about to print, and you need to click "OK" to dismiss the message before the page starts printing. This made it impossible to print multiple pages and walk away from the computer, because you needed to click "OK" before the next page would print. The Epson printer also has the paper-abrasion setting, but it does not throw up a warning message and simply prints what you ask it to.

CONCLUSION
All three printers have their strengths and weaknesses. For me the Epson Artisan 1430 was the easy winner. The output quality is fantastic, it didn't saturate the page with ink like the Canon, and the settings you have in the software are more than adequate.

If I was printing only graphics where vibrant photo output didn't matter, I would choose the HP. It has the smallest footprint and is certainly the most uncomplicated of the three printers. It is also the least expensive of the three by a good margin.

If I was printing mainly photos on heavy gloss photo paper, the Canon would be an enticing choice. It had a very slight edge in output quality over the Epson. However, the Epson has great output quality and has performed flawlessly in the several months I've had it, and if I had to buy another general-use wide-format printer today it would be the Epson.
Comment Comments (3) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Sep 12, 2014 4:54 PM PDT


HP Laserjet Enterprise 500 Color M551DN
HP Laserjet Enterprise 500 Color M551DN
Offered by pcrush-outlet
Price: $767.49
38 used & new from $449.99

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Warning: NOT Wireless, April 8, 2014
This is the second 500-series LaserJet I've owned. I loved the first one, and I bought this model thinking that it had wireless networking capability. (Amazon is advertising this as having wireless connectivity.) However, this is NOT the case. Your only two options to get this printer working as it comes out of the box are direct connect with a USB cable, or a networking connection with a CAT5 cable into your wired router.

This printer does offer printing from a wireless device like an iPhone or an iPad (a.k.a. ePrint). However, the printer itself still needs to be hooked up to a network with a cable. You can purchase an HP JetDirect wireless print server, but they are a significant additional expense and apparently have problems staying connected to the network from the reviews I've read (I do not own one).

As far as printing goes, as many other reviews state it is top notch. Great color and speed. Kudos to HP for selling this printer with full toner cartridges.

Unless you specifically need the ability to print directly from your iPad or must have the duplexing feature this model offers it is not worth the additional expense. I would instead recommend the M551N, which is less expensive but offers the same print quality, performance, and wired network connectivity.

Most if not all of HP's cheap inkjet printers offer easy wireless access; I have no idea why they don't offer it in their high-end laser printers, but it is a big disappointment. This printer weighs a lot (as in, HP tells you to use two people to lift it), and wireless capability would make this printer more versatile, especially for those people like me whose home office is up a flight of stairs.


Mesa Label Express® 2" x 3" - Fragile - Handle with Care Shipping Labels (500 per Roll)
Mesa Label Express® 2" x 3" - Fragile - Handle with Care Shipping Labels (500 per Roll)
Offered by Mesa Label Express
Price: $8.99

5.0 out of 5 stars Great Lables, No Advertising, November 29, 2013
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
The last FRAGILE labels I bought had the company's name and website on each label. These do not--thumbs up for Mesa Label. These are great labels, they perform well and are a bargain compared to places like Uline.


Inktoneram Remanufactured Ink Cartridges High CapacityReplacement for 127 (2xBlack, Cyan, Magenta, Yellow, 5-Pack)
Inktoneram Remanufactured Ink Cartridges High CapacityReplacement for 127 (2xBlack, Cyan, Magenta, Yellow, 5-Pack)
Offered by E-z ink
Price: $9.27
7 used & new from $4.21

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Awful, July 25, 2013
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
I do a lot of printing and have used non-OEM ink for years on various printers I have owned. Brand name manufacturers' ink is incredibly expensive, and I have always gotten good results at a fraction of the price from the non-OEM ink. Inktoneram is the first brand I've used that I would call junk.

I've been using the Inktoneram ink for several months. The most common problem is the printer not recognizing cartridges. I'm careful not to touch the IC chips, and always careful to insert them correctly, but if I replace a full set of ink cartridges there is a 50/50 chance one of them is not going to be recognized.

Another more serious problem is the cartridges leaking. A month ago I ordered four sets of cartridges, and the cyan cartridges were leaking inside the protective bag in three of the four sets. Fortunately I caught this before opening the plastic.

Tonight, however, was the last straw. I went to change the ink cartridges in my printer, carefully pulled the yellow tabs off each cartridge, and as soon as I pulled the tab off the black cartridge ink started oozing out of the top and on to my hand. As soon as I realized what happened I ran for the garbage can, but my hands are now stained with black ink. I had four black cartridges in my most recent order, and all did the same thing. Thank God I did not get any on the carpet.

I have not lost faith in third-party ink yet, but I'll certainly never use the Inktoneram brand again. The low price is makes them tempting, but considering the high percentage of defective cartridges, the actual cost is quite high.


Sanrio Regular Size Hello Kitty Nail Clippers
Sanrio Regular Size Hello Kitty Nail Clippers
Offered by Ohanami Japan
Price: $12.90
3 used & new from $12.90

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars World's Greatest Nail Clippers, June 11, 2013
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
I discovered Kai's nail clippers when I was in Japan several years ago. They far surpassed anything I had used before. They are sharp, sized perfectly, and have a smooth cutting action. Conveniently, the cut nails almost always go into the body of the cutter, which is easy to empty. Hello Kitty is not my style, but disregarding the appearance these were the only ones I could find that were identical to the ones I purchased in Japan. Some people will love the Hello Kitty styling, but if you are not one of those people do not be put off: If you want superior nail clippers, these are the ones to get.


Brother Printer HL6180DW Wireless Monochrome Printer
Brother Printer HL6180DW Wireless Monochrome Printer
Price: $249.99
94 used & new from $224.40

11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Unusable For Me - Trips Circuit Breaker, May 19, 2013
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
I was tired of using my slow, ink-hogging inkjet printer to print invoices and black and white documents so I decided to give a laser printer a try. This one had the two biggest items on my wish list: 500-sheet capacity and high-capacity toner cartridges.

After receiving and unpacking it, the next step in the quick-start guide was to plug it in and turn it on. About three seconds after turning it on a circuit breaker blew and all the power went off in my bedroom-turned-home office. I reset the circuit breaker and tried again--same thing. I tried a third time with everything in the room turned off and it again blew the circuit breaker.

I did some research on the problem and it turns out blowing circuit breakers is not uncommon with Brother laser printers. None of the reviews for this particular model complained about this, but if you look at the reviews for this printer's less-expensive cousin, the Brother HL5450DN, there are many people reporting this problem.

One thing my research uncovered is that modern building codes dictate that bedrooms have an extra level of protection in the circuit breakers vs. other rooms in the house. I probably could have set this printer up somewhere else and it would have worked. However, this would have meant putting it downstairs (with my home office being upstairs), which would simply not have worked for me.

I was determined not to go back to my inkjet, so I returned this printer and purchased a HP LaserJet Pro 400. According to the manufacturers' specs, this Brother printer uses 727 watts of power while printing, and the HP 570 watts. I don't know if it's the difference in power consumption or some other factor, but I've had the HP for several days and it works in my home office without a problem. It's more expensive, and in order to get 500-sheet capacity you need to purchase an additional tray (which costs half the price of the printer!), but I haven't seen any reviews complaining of it causing power problems, and it worked successfully in my case when the Brother didn't.

The Brother HL6180DW has a great feature list and looking at the other reviews it's clear that it works great for some people. If you are going to try this printer in a home office setting, I would very strongly suggest shutting down your computer before turning the printer on. I didn't, and had a tense situation when I turned my computer back on and Windows ran the "check disk" start-up utility and found a bunch of corrupt files on my hard disk. (Thankfully my computer came back up after running the utility for about an hour, and everything seems to be fine.) Shutting the power off on a running computer is a big no-no, so keep that in mind when powering up this printer for the first time.


iPhone 5 Case, Spigen Slim Armor Case for iPhone 5S/5 - 1 Pack - Retail Packaging - Gunmetal (SGP10089)
iPhone 5 Case, Spigen Slim Armor Case for iPhone 5S/5 - 1 Pack - Retail Packaging - Gunmetal (SGP10089)
Offered by Spigen Inc
Price: $17.99
21 used & new from $8.93

5.0 out of 5 stars Happy So Far, April 17, 2013
Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
This is a basic case for the iPhone 5 but it fits my needs perfectly. My two primary concerns were protection from minor drops and as little bulk as possible, and this case seems to fit those needs perfectly. I tried another case which was too bulky and made it hard to surf the phone with one hand; this case is slim enough to allow me to surf with one hand. The case seems solid, although I haven't dropped my phone yet to test. This is a no-frills case and that's what I wanted. I'm happy with it so far.


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