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Helpful Votes: 5




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Department of Dead Ends: 14 Detective Stories
Department of Dead Ends: 14 Detective Stories
by Roy Vickers
Edition: Paperback
22 used & new from $1.31

5.0 out of 5 stars Worth reviving, February 15, 2014
The copy I have is an old green Penguin which contains only ten stories. They are excellent, but the one which stands out for me is 'The Case of the Social Climber', an attack on the mores of the English ruling class which he obviously knew fairly well, and which should be in any collection of the best ever detective stories.


No Hero for the Kaiser
No Hero for the Kaiser
by Rudolf Frank
Edition: Library Binding
36 used & new from $0.01

4.0 out of 5 stars Not in my name, August 22, 2013
I read this on the day Bradley Manning was sentenced to 35 years for revealing the war crimes of his country. Jan, the young hero of this book, is another character who decides that he's had enough of 'my country right or wrong'. Some of the accounts of fighting, while shocking, become monotonous (well, I'm lucky enough not to have been there), but the arguments in the field hospital about who was responsible the war are excellent, and I'll remember the middle-aged soldier who collapses when he is being bullied by his own officer. I wish I could find out more about the author - there's hardly any information.


Horace and Me: Life Lessons from an Ancient Poet
Horace and Me: Life Lessons from an Ancient Poet
Offered by Macmillan
Price: $8.89

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars I loved it, July 26, 2013
My credentials as a Latin scholar are not brilliant. At school I didn't study Horace but Caesar's Commentaries, not the sort of stuff to make a strong appeal to teenage girls. But I loved his poems when I got to know more about them, even though I had to have an English translation on hand. I also loved Harry Eyres' book, which argues that an awful lot of what the great Roman says is relevant today, and which is laid-back, amusing but also serious. Translating Latin poems into decent English poems cannot be easy - but he does it very skilfully. So I immediately sat down and tried to translate 'Eheu fugaces'.


John Everett Millais: A Biography
John Everett Millais: A Biography
by Gordon H. Fleming
Edition: Hardcover
23 used & new from $4.42

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Unreliable, June 12, 2013
I've given this book two stars instead of one because Fleming has done his homework; he has read the manuscripts and occasionally comes up with some interesting information. But it's a very bad book, and I'm sorry to see it still in some libraries.
Be suspicious from the very first page, on which Fleming says that the painter was his parents' eldest child - when in fact he was the youngest. And there are other errors; I stand by everything I said in my other Amazon review. But worst of all is the unpleasant cynical tone which pervades it. Millais was loved and respected by just about everyone who knew him and Fleming seems determined, for no good reason, to discredit him.


The War That Killed Achilles: The True Story of Homer's Iliad and the Trojan War
The War That Killed Achilles: The True Story of Homer's Iliad and the Trojan War
by Caroline Alexander
Edition: Hardcover
146 used & new from $0.01

1 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars From Trojan women to Greenham women, June 12, 2011
I've never been able to share the fashionable adulation of fighting men, from Achilles to Our Boys in Afghanistan. It's always the civilians, from the Trojan women in Euripides' great play to women and children in today's war zones, who suffer - and, unlike the fighting men, they didn't have a choice. Caroline Alexander obviously has a deep knowledge of her subject - I shall have to go back and read the Iliad again, in English - but her angle is that of a Greenham woman in the 1980s or the present-day Women in Black. One who insists that the voices of the victims should be heard.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Oct 31, 2011 10:20 AM PDT


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